Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2310 records – page 1 of 231.

[Cancer researchers, please, don't report on confidence intervals when it's not necessary!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17893
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 22;101(4):314
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2004
Author
Henrik Dal
Mikael Andersson
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 22;101(4):314
Date
Jan-22-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
14979015 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cancer researchers need statistical uncertainty!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17662
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 May 13;101(20):1842
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-2004
Author
Paul Dickman
Juni Palmgren
Yudi Pawitan
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 May 13;101(20):1842
Date
May-13-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Research
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
15190779 View in PubMed
Less detail

From diagnostic accuracy to accurate diagnosis: interpreting a test result with confidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180009
Source
Med Decis Making. 2004 May-Jun;24(3):313-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Guangyong Zou
Author Affiliation
Robarts Research Institute and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. gzou@robarts.ca
Source
Med Decis Making. 2004 May-Jun;24(3):313-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bayes Theorem
Canada
Confidence Intervals
Diagnosis
Humans
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The Standard for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy statement promotes the reporting of confidence intervals (CIs) for indices of diagnostic test accuracy. However, these indices must be combined with an estimate of pretest probability to properly interpret the results of such tests, thus yielding positive and negative predictive values. For small sample sizes, CI estimation for predictive values based on the classical logit transformation has been found to be very conservative. A method based on computer simulation has therefore been suggested as an alternative.
ACI procedure for predictive values that yields limits completely contained in those provided by the logit transformation is proposed and evaluated.
The proposed approach to CI construction maintains nominal coverage very well even when sample sizes are small.
Accurate CIs for positive and negative predictive values can be obtained without using computer simulation.
PubMed ID
15155020 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cause-specific mortality during and after pregnancy and the definition of maternal death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191183
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2002;23(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Linda A Turner
Michael S Kramer
Shiliang Liu
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Reproductive and Child Health, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2002;23(1):31-6
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Maternal mortality
Pregnancy
Abstract
As part of a study to determine whether maternal mortality in Canada is under- reported, we explored the validity of including deaths not directly related to pregnancy. We linked live birth and stillbirth registrations to death registrations of women of reproductive age from 1988 through 1992. We calculated standardized mortality ratios, by cause, from deaths in women known to have been pregnant and deaths in same-aged women not known to have been pregnant within the same time period. Women known to have been pregnant were approximately half as likely to die as would be expected in each of two six-month time periods: from 20 weeks gestation to 42 days postpartum (SMR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.5), and from 42 days to 225 days postpartum (SMR 0.5, 95% CI 0.5-0.6). Furthermore, pregnant and recently pregnant women were not more likely to die from specific causes, with the exception of diseases of the arteries, arterioles, and capillaries (SMR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3-7.7) during pregnancy or within 42 days of pregnancy termination. The only other SMR that was > 1 was for death from cerebrovascular disorders during pregnancy and up to 42 days postpartum, although not significantly so (SMR 1.4, 95% CI 0.8-2.2). No other cause-specific SMRs were > 1. Moreover, recently pregnant women were found to be much less likely to commit suicide or to be the victims of homicide. We found no empirical justification for including deaths not directly related to pregnancy in reported counts of maternal deaths for most of the causal categories we considered.
PubMed ID
11876834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comments on 'Confidence intervals for a ratio of binomial proportions based on paired data' by D. G. Bonett and R. M. Price, Statistics in Medicine 2006; 25:3039-3047.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161716
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Nov 10;26(25):4684-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2007
Author
Robert G Newcombe
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Nov 10;26(25):4684-5
Date
Nov-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Geography
Humans
Male
Police
Violence
Notes
Comment On: Stat Med. 2006 Sep 15;25(17):3039-4716345058
PubMed ID
17721871 View in PubMed
Less detail

Knowledge of Ontario's Tobacco Control Act in the community of Scarborough.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202000
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Mar-Apr;90(2):83-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
S L Ennis
J. Leroux
P J Warner
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health, Scarborough Office, Healthy Environments, Cancer and Epidemiology Program, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Mar-Apr;90(2):83-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Ontario
Questionnaires
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
10349211 View in PubMed
Less detail

Glutathione-S-transferase polymorphism and clinical features of acute drug poisoning in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29596
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2005 Apr;139(4):431-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
V A Vavilin
O G Safronova
N A Manankin
L F Kaznacheeva
V V Lyakhovich
Author Affiliation
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russia. drugsmet@soramn.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2005 Apr;139(4):431-3
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Confidence Intervals
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Odds Ratio
Poisoning - enzymology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Abstract
We studied the association of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and GSTP1 Ile105-Val105 polymorphism with the duration of intoxication, polyorgan failure, and severity of drug poisoning in children. The combination of GSTM1 and GSTT1 zero genotypes is a favorable sign for the duration of intoxication and severity of the disease.
PubMed ID
16027873 View in PubMed
Less detail

Studies of Swedish adjustable gastric band and Lap-Band: systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86171
Source
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2008 Mar-Apr;4(2):174-85
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cunneen Scott A
Phillips Edward
Fielding George
Banel Deirdre
Estok Rhonda
Fahrbach Kyle
Sledge Isabella
Author Affiliation
Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048, USA. scott.cunneen@cshs.org
Source
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2008 Mar-Apr;4(2):174-85
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Gastroplasty - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Obesity, Morbid - surgery
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Complications
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the large body of data describing the Swedish adjustable gastric band (SAGB) and Lap-Band (LB). METHODS: A systematic review was performed that included screening of studies published in any language (January 1, 1998 through April 30, 2006) identified through MEDLINE, Current Contents, or the Cochrane Library. Studies with > or =10 SAGB or LB patients reporting > or =30-day efficacy or safety outcomes were eligible for review; the data were extracted from the accepted studies. A weighted means analysis and random-effects meta-analysis of efficacy outcomes of interest were conducted. RESULTS: A total of 4592 bariatric surgery studies met the initial criteria. Of these studies, 129 (28,980 patients) were accepted (33 SAGB and 104 LB studies); most had a retrospective single-center design. For 4273 patients (36 treatment groups) in 33 SAGB studies and 24,707 patients (111 groups) in 104 LB studies, the mean baseline age (39.1-40.2 yr), body mass index (43.8-45.3 kg/m2), and gender (women 79.2-82.5%) were similar. A laparoscopic technique was used in > or =88% and a pars flaccida technique in > or =41% of both groups. Early mortality was equivalent for SAGB/LB (
PubMed ID
18243061 View in PubMed
Less detail

The role of psychosocial risk factors for injury in elite youth ice hockey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120370
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2013 May;23(3):216-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
McKay C
Campbell T
Meeuwisse W
Emery C
Author Affiliation
Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. cdmckay@ucalgary.ca
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2013 May;23(3):216-21
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Hockey - injuries - psychology
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
To determine the risk of injury associated with athletic identity, attitudes toward body checking, competitive state anxiety, and reinjury fear in elite youth ice hockey. Also, to determine if there is an elevated risk of subsequent injury associated with return to play before medical clearance.
Cohort study.
Hockey arenas, Calgary, Alberta.
A total of 316 male participants from 18 elite (A, AA, AAA), Bantam (age, 13-14 years), and Midget (age, 15-17 years) teams.
At season commencement and postinjury, participants completed the athletic identity measurement scale, competitive state anxiety inventory-2R, body checking questionnaire, and fear of reinjury questions.
Hockey injury resulting in medical attention, the inability to complete a hockey session, and/or missing a subsequent hockey session.
Players scoring below the 25th percentile in athletic identity were at increased risk of a first injury [incidence rate ratios (IRR), 1.53; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-2.22], but scoring above the 25th percentile was associated with subsequent injury (IRR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.01-6.04). There was no increase in risk associated with return to play before clearance (IRR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.30-5.42).
Athletic identity was implicated as an injury risk factor in this population. Return to play before medical clearance was not a risk factor in this study, but the point estimate warrants additional investigation.
PubMed ID
23011553 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mandatory helmet legislation and children's exposure to cycling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193189
Source
Inj Prev. 2001 Sep;7(3):228-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A K Macpherson
P C Parkin
T M To
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine and Population Health Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Canada. alison.macpherson@sickkids.on.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 2001 Sep;7(3):228-30
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Child
Confidence Intervals
Head Protective Devices - utilization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Ontario
Abstract
Mandatory helmet legislation for cyclists is the subject of much debate. Opponents of helmet legislation suggest that making riders wear helmets will reduce ridership, thus having a negative overall impact on health. Mandatory bicycle helmet legislation for children was introduced in Ontario, Canada in October 1995. The objective of our study was to examine trends in children's cycling rates before and after helmet legislation in one health district.
Child cyclists were observed at 111 preselected sites (schools, parks, residential streets, and major intersections) in the late spring and summer of 1993-97 and in 1999, in a defined urban community.
Trained observers counted the number of child cyclists. The number of children observed in each area was divided by the number of observation hours, resulting in the calculation of cyclists per hour.
A general linear model, using Tukey's method, compared the mean number of cyclists per hour for each year, and for each type of site.
Although the number of child cyclists per hour was significantly different in different years, these differences could not be attributed to legislation. In 1996, the year after legislation came into effect, average cycling levels were higher (6.84 cyclists per hour) than in 1995, the year before legislation (4.33 cyclists per hour).
Contrary to the findings in Australia, the introduction of helmet legislation did not have a significant negative impact on child cycling in this community.
Notes
Comment In: Inj Prev. 2003 Dec;9(4):380; author reply 380-114693905
PubMed ID
11565990 View in PubMed
Less detail

2310 records – page 1 of 231.