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Adolescent sexual behaviour: results from an Ontario sample. Part II: Adolescent use of protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205715
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 Mar-Apr;89(2):94-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
B H Thomas
A. DiCenso
L. Griffith
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON. thomash@fhs.csu.mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 Mar-Apr;89(2):94-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Condoms - utilization
Contraception - methods - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
This paper reports the frequency of use of protection and rates of birth control pill/condom use by age and gender among a large, sexually active group of Ontario adolescents who were followed from 12 to 17 years of age. The sample consisted of the 759 males and 690 females who reported engaging in sexual intercourse during the McMaster Teen Project. Significantly more females aged 15-17 years reported always using a method of protection, and using the birth control pill. Condom use was more frequent among males at all ages, but reached statistical significance at ages 12, 13 and 17 years. Although the numbers reporting no use of protection decreased with age, by 17 years 36% of males and 33% of females continued to report no use of protection. Large numbers of sexually active Ontario adolescents continue to be vulnerable to pregnancy, STDs and AIDS.
PubMed ID
9583248 View in PubMed
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AIDS optimism, condom fatigue, or self-esteem? Explaining unsafe sex among gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173573
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Barry D Adam
Winston Husbands
James Murray
John Maxwell
Author Affiliation
University of Windsor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. adam@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - psychology - transmission
Adult
Bisexuality - psychology
Condoms - utilization
Depression - psychology
Erectile Dysfunction - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Homosexuality, Male - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interview, Psychological
Intuition
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Self Concept
Sexual Partners - psychology
Truth Disclosure
Unsafe Sex - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines leading explanations for unsafe sex in light of in-depth interviews with 102 high-risk gay and bisexual men in Toronto to see how well they engage with the social circumstances and reasoning processes of men in their sexual relationships. We argue that there is an inadequate fit between some of the leading explanations and the discursive accounts provided by high risk men themselves. Their accounts focus on unsafe sex occurring as a resolution to condom and erectile difficulties, through momentary lapses and trade offs, out of personal turmoil and depression, and as a byproduct of strategies of disclosure and intuiting safety. This study examines, in particular the circumstances and rationales associated with men who identify their practices as "barebacking." We conclude with recommendations for communicating prevention messages to those most at risk based on the self-understandings of gay and bisexual men who most frequently practice unprotected sex.
PubMed ID
19817037 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and sexual risk reduction interventions among people living in Russia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263496
Source
AIDS Behav. 2014 Oct;18(10):1835-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Chiao-Wen Lan
Lori A J Scott-Sheldon
Kate B Carey
Blair T Johnson
Michael P Carey
Source
AIDS Behav. 2014 Oct;18(10):1835-46
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Condoms - utilization
European Continental Ancestry Group
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Prostitution - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Russia has one of the highest rates of alcohol consumption and is experiencing one of the fastest-growing HIV epidemics in the world. Given these co-occurring health problems, we systematically reviewed combined alcohol and sexual risk interventions to reduce HIV among Russians. We completed comprehensive electronic searches to locate studies that (a) sampled people living in Russia, (b) used a behavioral intervention, and (c) assessed both alcohol and sexual risk behavior. These searches yielded 584 studies, of these, two were included. Compared with controls, intervention participants reported increasing their condom use (ds ranged from 0.12 to 0.85). Within-group improvements in sexual behaviors were found for both groups (ds ranged from 0.19 to 1.94); participants reported fewer sexual partners, more condom use, and reduced alcohol or drug use before sex. These findings support the need and potential benefits for alcohol and HIV interventions among Russians, and suggest directions for public policy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24104461 View in PubMed
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Alcohol/drug exposure, HIV-related sexual risk among urban American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: evidence from a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130730
Source
J Sch Health. 2011 Nov;81(11):671-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler
Malembe S Ebama
Author Affiliation
Texas/Oklahoma AIDS Education and Training Center, Parkland Health and Hospital Systems, Dallas, USA. srmikl@parknet.pmh.org
Source
J Sch Health. 2011 Nov;81(11):671-9
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcoholism - ethnology
Condoms - utilization
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology
Male
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Migration of the native populations from reservations to the urban areas has resulted in mixed ethnicities of American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) children. Minority youth require special attention and services in urban schools as they disproportionately experience poverty, low educational attainment, unemployment, and single-parent status.
We used 2005 and 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data to examine alcohol/drug use patterns and their association with sexual risk taking among AIAN only (single-racial) and biracial youth in combination with White, African American, or Hispanic ethnicities (N = 1178).
Overall, one half of the students were sexually active, with significantly higher rates among males; AIAN-Black students initiated sex earlier than the other groups. Condom nonuse is higher among AIAN-Whites (>50%) compared to one third of AIAN-Hispanics and one fourth of AIAN-Blacks. Nearly 10% of all students, except AIAN-Blacks, reported lifetime use of heroin/meth. Sexual behavior was significantly associated with episodic drinking. Students with Hispanic background have twice the odds of being sexually active compared to AIANs.
Our findings underscore growing health care needs and targeted prevention initiatives for mixed racial underserved native youth. Urban school settings have potential to deliver services and offer alcohol/drug prevention programs to address the needs of mixed racial native urban youth. Using the School Based Health Clinic model has been successful; we need to reform prevention approaches to accommodate needs of multiracial urban native youth.
PubMed ID
21972987 View in PubMed
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The anatomy of a forbidden desire: men, penetration and semen exchange.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175938
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Dave Holmes
Dan Warner
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5. dholmes@uottawa.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Condoms - utilization
Drive
Europe
Gift Giving
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Pleasure-Pain Principle
Postmodernism
Professional Role
Psychoanalytic Interpretation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Semen
Symbolism
Taboo - psychology
Unsafe Sex - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The rising popularity of unprotected anal sex (bareback sex) among men who have sex with men (MSM) is perplexing healthcare providers working in sexual health clinics. Epidemiological research on the topic overlooks several socio-cultural and psychological dimensions. Our research attempts to construct an appropriate theoretical edifice by which we can understand this sexual practice. In order to achieve this objective, a qualitative design was selected and 18 semiconductive in-depth interviews were carried out with barebackers from five European and North American cities. We then analyzed the data using two theoretical approaches that were sensitive to the issues of desire, transgression and pleasure. These theories are those of the late French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, and those of poststructural thinkers, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. These theoretical frameworks helped shed light on the significance of bareback sex, and can potentially influence healthcare providers in gaining a better understanding not only of their clients, but also of their own role in the circuitry of desire at work within bareback. We found that while the exchange of semen constitutes a dangerous and irrational practice to healthcare professionals, it is nevertheless a significant variable in the sexual lives of barebackers that needs to be taken into consideration in the provision of healthcare services.
PubMed ID
15743438 View in PubMed
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An update on knowledge and sexual behaviour among students in Greenland. Monitoring of the stop-AIDS campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223140
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1992 Sep;20(3):158-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
L. Werdelin
J. Misfeldt
M. Melbye
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Steno Institute of Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Aarhus C.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1992 Sep;20(3):158-64
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Condoms - utilization
Data Collection
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
Greenland is a considered high risk area for a self-sustained heterosexual HIV-epidemic due to rather relaxed sexual norms in larger segments of the population and a high incidence of sexual transmitted diseases. However, the prevalence of HIV-positives is still low. As part of a monitoring programme longitudinal studies of young peoples' knowledge and sexual behaviour has been established. This paper presents results from the second survey among all students in vocational training and all 10th grade students in the public schools. Previous studies were performed in 1988 and 1989. The present study which took place in April 1991 involved a total of 1201 students, or about 85% of all students in the target groups (95% among students present on the day of surveying). Data collection was based upon standardized self-administered questionnaires. The study showed better knowledge than previously but no marked change in sexual habits. The age of sexual début even appeared to be decreasing. More than half reported a sexual début before the age of 15. More than 20% reported 10 sexual partners or more within the last year. HIV has still not reached the young population in Greenland but when it happens the present sexual behaviour carries a high risk of a self-sustained epidemic.
PubMed ID
1485152 View in PubMed
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Assessment of sexual behavior, sexual attitudes, and sexual risk in Sweden (1989-2003).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7165
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Apr;34(2):219-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Claes Herlitz
Kristina Ramstedt
Author Affiliation
Dalarna Research Institute, Falun, Sweden. claes.herlitz@dfr.se
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Apr;34(2):219-29
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Condoms - utilization
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess changes in sexual behavior, sexual attitudes, and sexual risk related to HIV, we conducted mailed questionnaire surveys in random samples of the Swedish general population in 1989, 1994, 1997, 2000, and 2003 (total N = 13,762). Each sample consisted of 4,000-6,000 subjects aged 16-44 years, stratified by age: 16-17, 18-19, 20-24, 25-34, and 35-44 years. The overall participation rate was 63.8% (for men, 55.9%; for women, 71.9%). The prevalence of three or more sexual partners and casual sexual contacts without the use of a condom was comparatively high for men, for persons aged 16-24 years, single persons with and without a regular partner, and persons living in towns and urban areas. The prevalence of multiple sexual partners and casual sexual contacts increased significantly over time. There was a significant decrease in the proportion of participants who agreed with the statement "Sexual intercourse should only take place in a stable relationship." Personal risk assessments related to HIV did not change significantly over time. The study shows that risky sexual behavior related to HIV/AIDS increased in the Swedish population between 1989 and 2003, and that attitudes concerning casual sexual relations became more permissive.
PubMed ID
15803255 View in PubMed
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The association between substance use, unplanned sexual intercourse and other sexual behaviours among adolescent students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195049
Source
Addiction. 2001 Apr;96(4):607-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
C. Poulin
L. Graham
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Christiane.Poulin@dal.ca
Source
Addiction. 2001 Apr;96(4):607-21
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking
Coitus - psychology
Condoms - utilization
Contraception
Female
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Students
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviours and the influence of substance use and unplanned sexual intercourse on multiple sexual partners, inconsistent condom use and reasons for not always using condoms among adolescent students.
A standardized self-reported anonymous questionnaire administered to a representative sample of students.
The Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island in 1998.
9997 students in grades 9, 10 and 12 in the public school system.
Items on sexual intercourse, unplanned sexual intercourse, number of sexual partners, condom use, alcohol use, episodes of binge drinking and drunkenness, cigarette smoking and cannabis use.
About 37.5% of males and 39.7% of females reported having engaged in sexual intercourse in the 12 months prior to the survey. Of those, 68.0% of males and 61.5% of females reported having engaged in unplanned sexual intercourse, 40.9% of males and 32.1% of females reported having more than one sexual partner, and 49.9% of males and 64.1% of females reported inconsistent condom use. Unplanned sexual intercourse under the influence of alcohol or other drug was found to be an independent risk factor for multiple sexual partners and inconsistent condom use.
The demonstration of an association between substance use, unplanned sexual intercourse and other sexual behaviours lends support to a harm minimization approach, including the provision of non-judgemental information and interventions addressing unplanned sexual intercourse under the influence of a substance.
PubMed ID
11300964 View in PubMed
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Avoiding unwanted pregnancy--the role of communication, information and knowledge in the use of contraception among young Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63472
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Sep;38(1):11-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
J. Sundby
J. Svanemyr
T. Maehre
Author Affiliation
Section for Medical Anthropology, Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway. johanne.sundby@samfunsmed.uio.no
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Sep;38(1):11-9
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Communication
Condoms - utilization
Contraception Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Contraceptives, Postcoital
Educational Status
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Needs Assessment
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sex Education - standards
Sexual Behavior
Women - education - psychology
Abstract
Despite relatively easy access to contraceptives, a liberal attitude to pregnancies out of wedlock and a widespread family planning education in schools, too a high number of adolescent women in Oslo, the capital of Norway, become pregnant and resort to abortions. The aim of this study was to identify some new entry points to sexuality, contraceptive, abortion and post-abortion counselling. Using a qualitative approach, we interviewed 102 young women in Oslo who were seeking either an abortion or contraceptives. The study demonstrated that contraceptive awareness is good, but that there are different levels of consistency in contraceptive use among women, and that even women with few partners and fairly good contraceptive compliance sometimes experience unplanned pregnancy. The study reviews some issues of importance where communication with young women could be improved. These issues include better formal information about OCs, increased information on emergency contraception, better condom promotion, and an attempt to involve better informed adults, including paramedical professional counselling. In addition, contraceptive prescriptions should accord to the type of behaviour and the relationships the young women have.
PubMed ID
14528567 View in PubMed
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[Big changes of sexual habits among adolescents. Later start and increased use of condoms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64737
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 16;91(11):1083-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-1994
Author
G. Swedin
G. Näslund
K. Evetorp
Author Affiliation
Mödrahälsovårdsöverläkare i Jämtlands län, Ostersunds sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 16;91(11):1083-4
Date
Mar-16-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Condoms - utilization
Contraception Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
During 1986 and 1991, two large questionnaire studies were carried out concerning the attitudes and knowledge about contraceptives, the start of sexual activity, and the avoidance of unwanted pregnancy among 500 secondary school students in Ostersund and the county of Jamtland, Sweden. Among those who had had their first intercourse, the average age of first intercourse increased from 15 years and 4 months to 16 years and 2 months for girls. For boys the age of first intercourse was 16 years and 3 months in 1986 vs. 17 years in 1991. In Ostersund itself this age was 18 years for boys, while for those growing up in the countryside outside of Ostersund, this age stayed the same at 16 years. In 1991, girls tended to be less protected during first intercourse: only 54% used the condom or oral contraceptives (OCs) vs. 64% in 1986. In contrast, 75% of boys used either the condom or their partner relied on OCs during the first intercourse. The opposition to OCs was indicated by the fact that earlier 85% of those in longer relationships ( 6 months) used OCs compared with only 70% in 1991. A large percentage of both girls and boys also admitted in 1991 that they had had intercourse without any protection compared with 1986. Neither in 1986 nor in 1991 did any teenage girls use IUDs. When asked about their reaction to an unplanned pregnancy, in 1991, 1 out of 4 girls thought that they would give birth vs. 1 out of 7 in 1986. The reasons for not using OCs included fear from side effects, which increased from 1 out of 4 in 1986 to 1 out of 3 in 1991. There was also a promising trend of a decreasing rate of chlamydia infections both in the county of Jamtland and in the country in general, presumably owing to the increased use of condoms. These findings induced the county of Jamtland in April 1992 to subsidize OCs for women under the age of 25 years.
PubMed ID
8139336 View in PubMed
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134 records – page 1 of 14.