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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness, part 1: contextualizing case management for ending homelessness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130590
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, AB, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management
Community Health Services
Concept Formation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Homeless Persons
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, organizational
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and part-2 articulates the 6 Dimensions of Quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are: (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
21986969 View in PubMed
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[A comment to the article by Torbjorn Tannsjo on "severe mental retardation": A necessary even when not sufficient contribution to the debate].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197872
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jun 14;97(24):2994
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2000
Author
C. Nordin
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping. CoNo@Psy.Liu.SE
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jun 14;97(24):2994
Date
Jun-14-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Concept Formation
Humans
Intellectual Disability - classification - diagnosis
Mentally Disabled Persons
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
PubMed ID
10900884 View in PubMed
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[ADDH/DAMP--some reflections after the dispute is calming down]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32168
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1958-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2001
Author
C. Sundelin
D. Lagerberg
Author Affiliation
claes.sundelin@ped.uas.lul.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1958-61
Date
Apr-18-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Child
Child Psychiatry
Concept Formation
Humans
Sweden
Terminology
PubMed ID
11370417 View in PubMed
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Addressing the struggle to link form and understanding in fractions instruction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116717
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2013 Mar;83(Pt 1):29-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Helena P Osana
Nicole Pitsolantis
Author Affiliation
Concordia University, Québec, Canada. osana@education.concordia.ca
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2013 Mar;83(Pt 1):29-56
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child
Comprehension
Concept Formation
Female
Humans
Learning
Male
Mathematics - education
Students
Abstract
Although making explicit links between procedures and concepts during instruction in mathematics is important, it is still unclear the precise moments during instruction when such links are best made.
The objective was to test the effectiveness of a 3-week classroom intervention on the fractions knowledge of grade 5/6 students. The instruction was based on a theory that specifies three sites during the learning process where concepts and symbols can be connected (Hiebert, 1984): symbol interpretation, procedural execution, and solution evaluation. Sample. Seventy students from one grade 5/6 split and two grade 6 classrooms in two public elementary schools participated.
The students were randomly assigned to treatment and control. The treatment (Sites group) received instruction that incorporated specific connections between fractions concepts and procedures at each of the three sites specified by the Sites theory. Before and after the intervention, the students' knowledge of concepts and procedures was assessed, and a random subsample of 30 students from both conditions were individually interviewed to measure their ability to make specific connections between concepts and symbols at each of the three sites.
While all students gained procedural skill (p
PubMed ID
23369174 View in PubMed
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Adolescent constructions of nicotine addiction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180194
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Joy L Johnson
Barbara Moffat
Jeevan Grewal
Pamela A Ratner
Cecilia Kalaw
Author Affiliation
Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, School of Nursing, T201-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. bottorff@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavior, Addictive - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Causality
Cognitive Dissonance
Concept Formation
Family - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Social Perception
Tobacco Use Disorder - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to extend our understanding of how adolescents view nicotine addiction. This secondary analysis included 80 open-ended interviews with adolescents with a variety of smoking histories. The transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient explanations of nicotine addiction. These explanations presuppose causal pathways of nicotine exposure leading to addiction and include repeated use, the brain and body "getting used to" nicotine, personal weakness, and family influences. A further explanation is that some youths pretend to be addicted to project a "cool" image. These explanations illustrate that some youths see themselves as passive players in the formation of nicotine addiction. The findings can be used in the development of programs to raise youth awareness about nicotine addiction.
PubMed ID
15133917 View in PubMed
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Adolescent turning points: the association between meaning-making and psychological well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129295
Source
Dev Psychol. 2012 Jul;48(4):1058-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Royette Tavernier
Teena Willoughby
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, L2S 3A1. rt09la@brocku.ca
Source
Dev Psychol. 2012 Jul;48(4):1058-68
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Concept Formation
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Research findings indicate that the ability to create meaning out of turning points (i.e., significant life experiences) is related to psychological well-being. It is not clear, however, whether individuals who report meaning-making and higher well-being are better adjusted prior to the experience of their turning point event. This study examined whether meaning-making and timing of turning points would be associated with higher scores on well-being. Participants were 418 Grade 12 students (209 of whom reported having had a turning point event and a matched group of 209 adolescents who did not report having had a turning point event). This subset of participants was taken from a larger longitudinal study of 803 (52% female) Grade 12 Canadian students (M age = 17 years). All participants completed well-being measures 3 years prior, when they were in Grade 9. Meaning-making was significantly associated with higher psychological well-being, controlling for Grade 9 scores on well-being. Importantly, adolescents who reported meaning-making in Grade 12 did not differ on well-being prior to the experience of their turning point event, when they were in Grade 9, from adolescents who did not report meaning-making. These findings highlight the importance of examining meaning-making in relation to positive adjustment among adolescents reporting a significant life-changing event. Limitations regarding the use of survey measures and the generalizability of the results to a culturally diverse group of adolescents are discussed.
PubMed ID
22122472 View in PubMed
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Advancing complex explanatory conceptualizations of daily negative and positive affect: trigger and maintenance coping action patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256512
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2014 Jan;61(1):93-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
David M Dunkley
Denise Ma
Ihno A Lee
Kristopher J Preacher
David C Zuroff
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lady Davis Institute-Jewish General Hospital.
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2014 Jan;61(1):93-109
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Affect
Concept Formation
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Problem Solving
Psychometrics
Psychotherapy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Abstract
The present study addressed a fundamental gap between research and clinical work by advancing complex explanatory conceptualizations of coping action patterns that trigger and maintain daily negative affect and (low) positive affect. One hundred ninety-six community adults completed measures of perfectionism, and then 6 months later completed questionnaires at the end of the day for 14 consecutive days to provide simultaneous assessments of appraisals, coping, and affect across different stressful situations in everyday life. Multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) supported complex explanatory conceptualizations that demonstrated (a) disengagement trigger patterns consisting of several distinct appraisals (e.g., event stress) and coping strategies (e.g., avoidant coping) that commonly operate together across many different stressors when the typical individual experiences daily increases in negative affect and drops in positive affect; and (b) disengagement maintenance patterns composed of different appraisal and coping maintenance factors that, in combination, can explain why individuals with higher levels of self-critical perfectionism have persistent daily negative affect and low positive mood 6 months later. In parallel, engagement patterns (triggers and maintenance) composed of distinct appraisals (e.g., perceived social support) and coping strategies (e.g., problem-focused coping) were linked to compensatory experiences of daily positive affect. These findings demonstrate the promise of using daily diary methodologies and MSEM to promote a shared understanding between therapists and clients of trigger and maintenance coping action patterns that explain what precipitates and perpetuates clients' difficulties, which, in turn, can help achieve the 2 overarching therapy goals of reducing clients' distress and bolstering resilience.
Notes
Erratum In: J Couns Psychol. 2014 Apr;61(2):263
PubMed ID
24447060 View in PubMed
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Assessment of understanding by people manifesting mental retardation: a preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211355
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Aug;83(1):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
E M Coles
T T Freitas
R. Tweed
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia. michael_coles@SFU.ca
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Aug;83(1):187-92
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awareness
Canada
Concept Formation
Humans
Intellectual Disability - diagnosis - psychology
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Neuropsychological Tests
United States
Abstract
An analysis of the psychological aspects of the legal concept of competency/fitness to stand trial draws attention to the central role of understanding. The rationale of certain basic requirements for the construct validity of a psychometric test of understanding in people with mental retardation is presented, and a test that meets those requirements is described.
PubMed ID
8873190 View in PubMed
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Associations between young children's emotion attributions and prediction of outcome in differing social situations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96939
Source
Br J Dev Psychol. 2010 Jun;28(Pt 2):499-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Areana R Eivers
Mara Brendgen
Anne I H Borge
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. areana.eivers@psykologi.uio.no
Source
Br J Dev Psychol. 2010 Jun;28(Pt 2):499-504
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior - physiology - psychology
Concept Formation - physiology
Cues
Emotions - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Abstract
Associations between young children's attributions of emotion at different points in a story, and with regard to their own prediction about the story's outcome, were investigated using two hypothetical scenarios of social and emotional challenge (social entry and negative event). First grade children (N = 250) showed an understanding that emotions are tied to situational cues by varying the emotions they attributed both between and within scenarios. Furthermore, emotions attributed to the main protagonist at the beginning of the scenarios were differentially associated with children's prediction of a positive or negative outcome and with the valence of the emotion attributed at the end of the scenario. Gender differences in responses to some items were also found.
PubMed ID
20481401 View in PubMed
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[Child abuse--estimation and evaluation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33593
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Nov 9;160(46):6665-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-9-1998
Author
J W Holm
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Nov 9;160(46):6665-6
Date
Nov-9-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Concept Formation
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Sep 7;160(37):5358-629748862
PubMed ID
9825688 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.