Skip header and navigation

Refine By

79 records – page 1 of 8.

[General pathology concepts of I.E. Diad'kovskii i F.I. Inozemtsev].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225786
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1991 Sep;69(9):120-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Source
Can Nurse. 1988 Apr;84(4):24-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988

A framework for stakeholder identification in concept mapping and health research: a novel process and its application to older adult mobility and the built environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114201
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:428
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Claire Schiller
Meghan Winters
Heather M Hanson
Maureen C Ashe
Author Affiliation
Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, 6F-2635 Laurel Street, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada. claire.schiller@hiphealth.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:428
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Concept Formation
Environment Design
Female
Health Promotion - standards
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Motor Activity
Public Health Administration
Public Policy
Abstract
Stakeholders, as originally defined in theory, are groups or individual who can affect or are affected by an issue. Stakeholders are an important source of information in health research, providing critical perspectives and new insights on the complex determinants of health. The intersection of built and social environments with older adult mobility is an area of research that is fundamentally interdisciplinary and would benefit from a better understanding of stakeholder perspectives. Although a rich body of literature surrounds stakeholder theory, a systematic process for identifying health stakeholders in practice does not exist. This paper presents a framework of stakeholders related to older adult mobility and the built environment, and further outlines a process for systematically identifying stakeholders that can be applied in other health contexts, with a particular emphasis on concept mapping research.
Informed by gaps in the relevant literature we developed a framework for identifying and categorizing health stakeholders. The framework was created through a novel iterative process of stakeholder identification and categorization. The development entailed a literature search to identify stakeholder categories, representation of identified stakeholders in a visual chart, and correspondence with expert informants to obtain practice-based insight.
The three-step, iterative creation process progressed from identifying stakeholder categories, to identifying specific stakeholder groups and soliciting feedback from expert informants. The result was a stakeholder framework comprised of seven categories with detailed sub-groups. The main categories of stakeholders were, (1) the Public, (2) Policy makers and governments, (3) Research community, (4) Practitioners and professionals, (5) Health and social service providers, (6) Civil society organizations, and (7) Private business.
Stakeholders related to older adult mobility and the built environment span many disciplines and realms of practice. Researchers studying this issue may use the detailed stakeholder framework process we present to identify participants for future projects. Health researchers pursuing stakeholder-based projects in other contexts are encouraged to incorporate this process of stakeholder identification and categorization to ensure systematic consideration of relevant perspectives in their work.
Notes
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2005 Jun;17(3):187-9115872026
Cites: Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2012 Aug;32(2):93-10023099869
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Aug;63(4):1011-2216650513
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2008 Jul;5(4):488-50318648115
Cites: J Environ Manage. 2009 Apr;90(5):1933-4919231064
Cites: Public Health. 2010 Mar;124(3):159-6620227095
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2011 Aug;101(8):1410-921680923
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2011 Nov-Dec;17(6):E1-E1121964372
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2000 Sep;15(3):239-4611012397
Cites: Health Policy. 2002 Aug;61(2):213-3612088893
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Aug;23(2 Suppl):64-7312133739
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1998;19:173-2029611617
Cites: Eval Program Plann. 2012 May;35(2):236-4522221889
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2012 Nov;43(5 Suppl 4):S337-5023079266
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Dec;15(10):1392-41016263919
PubMed ID
23639179 View in PubMed
Less detail

"What do they want me to say?" The hidden curriculum at work in the medical school selection process: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125830
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2012;12:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jonathan White
Keith Brownell
Jean-Francois Lemay
Jocelyn M Lockyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. jswhite1@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2012;12:17
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Concept Formation
Curriculum
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Theoretical
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical
Writing
Abstract
There has been little study of the role of the essay question in selection for medical school. The purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of how applicants approached the essay questions used in selection at our medical school in 2007.
The authors conducted a qualitative analysis of 210 essays written as part of the medical school admissions process, and developed a conceptual framework to describe the relationships, ideas and concepts observed in the data.
Findings of this analysis were confirmed in interviews with applicants and assessors. Analysis revealed a tension between "genuine" and "expected" responses that we believe applicants experience when choosing how to answer questions in the admissions process. A theory named "What do they want me to say?" was developed to describe the ways in which applicants modulate their responses to conform to their expectations of the selection process; the elements of this theory were confirmed in interviews with applicants and assessors.
This work suggests the existence of a "hidden curriculum of admissions" and demonstrates that the process of selection has a strong influence on applicant response. This paper suggests ways that selection might be modified to address this effect. Studies such as this can help us to appreciate the unintended consequences of admissions processes and can identify ways to make the selection process more consistent, transparent and fair.
Notes
Cites: Med Educ. 2000 Mar;34(3):16510733698
Cites: Med Teach. 2011;33(10):e541-821942490
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2001;6(2):159-7511435766
Cites: Teach Learn Med. 2002 Winter;14(1):34-4211865747
Cites: Acad Med. 2002 Jun;77(6):475-8012063190
Cites: Mt Sinai J Med. 2002 Nov;69(6):385-9712429957
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2002;7(3):191-20012510141
Cites: Acad Med. 2003 Feb;78(2):189-20112584098
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2003 Nov;23(8):620-714554116
Cites: Med Educ. 2004 Mar;38(3):314-2614996341
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2004;9(2):137-4515141131
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2004;9(2):161-7415141133
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2004;9(2):79-8215222333
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Oct 2;329(7469):770-315459051
Cites: Acad Med. 1994 Nov;69(11):861-717945681
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Jan 15;156(2):219-229012725
Cites: Am J Occup Ther. 1997 Oct;51(9):775-99311434
Cites: Acad Med. 1998 Jan;73(1):55-79447202
Cites: Acad Med. 1998 Apr;73(4):403-79580717
Cites: Med Educ. 2007 Jun;41(6):573-917518837
Cites: Med Teach. 2007 May;29(4):394-617786758
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2007 Nov;12(4):509-2117703368
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2008 May;13(2):193-20217043916
Cites: Acad Med. 2008 May;83(5):516-2018448911
Cites: Acad Med. 2008 Jul;83(7):623-418580074
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Jul;23(7):942-718612721
Cites: Med Teach. 2008;30(6):606-1118608968
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2009 Dec;14(5):759-7519340597
Cites: Med Educ. 2000 Aug;34(8):642-710964212
PubMed ID
22448658 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Apr 10;120(10):1122-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2000
Author
E. Falkum
Author Affiliation
Legeforeningens forskningsinstitutt, Oslo. erik.falkum@legeforeningen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Apr 10;120(10):1122-8
Date
Apr-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Burnout, Professional - diagnosis - psychology
Concept Formation
Depression - diagnosis
Emotions
Empathy
English Abstract
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workload
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Burnout is most often described as a concept with three separate dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization (lack of empathy), and reduced accomplishments at work. We wanted to study the descriptive validity of the concept, which may be measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Maslach Burnout Inventory was mailed to 1,476 members of the Norwegian Medical Association. The response rate was 73%. The dimensional structure of the instrument was examined by principal component analysis, and the identified factors correlated with validated measures of job satisfaction and depression. The dichotomized factors were combined in eight different ways, and the specificity of the resulting types was studied. RESULTS: The three original dimensions were reproduced, and the internal consistency of the factors was good (Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.91 to 0.69). There were high correlations between emotional exhaustion and both job satisfaction (r = -0.54) and depression (r = 0.72). INTERPRETATION: Emotional exhaustion seems to be the least specific of the burnout dimensions. For the purpose of reasonable descriptive validity, the burnout notion should be based on both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. With the applied dichotomization thresholds, this implies that 3% of Norwegian physicians are "burned out".
PubMed ID
10863339 View in PubMed
Less detail

Trainee multicultural case conceptualization ability and couples therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135685
Source
J Marital Fam Ther. 2011 Apr;37(2):223-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Allison M Schomburg
Loreto R Prieto
Author Affiliation
University of Akron, Ohio, USA.
Source
J Marital Fam Ther. 2011 Apr;37(2):223-35
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans
Aged
Canada
Concept Formation
Couples Therapy
Cultural Competency - education
Data Collection
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Competence - standards
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous literature on the assessment of multicultural counseling competence has been concerned only with counselors' abilities when working with individual clients. We expanded this line of research by investigating trainees' multicultural case conceptualization ability in the context of working with couples. Despite the fact that trainees self-reported a high level of multicultural competency, trainees were largely inattentive to racial factors in their case conceptualization responses to vignettes involving both African American and European American clients presenting for couples therapy. On the whole, despite didactic, clinical, and extracurricular training in multiculturalism, marriage and family therapy trainees did not sufficiently incorporate cultural factors into their clinical case conceptualizations. We discuss implications for teaching, practice, and future research.
PubMed ID
21457286 View in PubMed
Less detail

Report of an international conference on the medical and ethical management of the neonate at the edge of viability: a review of approaches from five countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135988
Source
HEC Forum. 2011 Mar;23(1):31-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
William R Sexson
Deborah K Cruze
Marilyn B Escobedo
Alfred W Brann
Author Affiliation
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. wsexson@emory.edu
Source
HEC Forum. 2011 Mar;23(1):31-42
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Concept Formation
Congresses as topic
Europe
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care, Neonatal - ethics
Resuscitation - ethics
Russia
United States
Abstract
Current United States guidelines for neonatal resuscitation note that there is no mandate to resuscitate infants in all situations. For example, the fetus that at the time of delivery is determined to be so premature as to be non-viable need not be aggressively resuscitated. The hypothetical case of an extremely premature infant was presented to neonatologists from the United States and four other European countries at a September 2006 international meeting sponsored by the World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Reproductive Health of Atlanta (currently, the Global Collaborating Center in Reproductive Health). Responses to the case varied by country, due to differences in legal, ethical and related practice parameters, rather than differences in medical technology, as similar medical technology was available within each country. Variations in approach seemed to stem from physicians' perceptions of their ability to remove the neonate from life support if this appeared non-beneficial. There appears to be a desire for greater convergence in practice options and more open discussion regarding the practical problems underlying the variability. Specifically, the conference attendees identified four areas that need to be addressed: (1) lack of international consensus guidelines in viability and therapeutic options, (2) lack of bodies capable of generating these guidelines, (3) variation in laws between countries, and (4) the frequent failure of physicians and families to confront death at the beginning of life.
PubMed ID
21424778 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent constructions of nicotine addiction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180194
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Joy L Johnson
Barbara Moffat
Jeevan Grewal
Pamela A Ratner
Cecilia Kalaw
Author Affiliation
Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, School of Nursing, T201-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. bottorff@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavior, Addictive - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Causality
Cognitive Dissonance
Concept Formation
Family - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Social Perception
Tobacco Use Disorder - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to extend our understanding of how adolescents view nicotine addiction. This secondary analysis included 80 open-ended interviews with adolescents with a variety of smoking histories. The transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient explanations of nicotine addiction. These explanations presuppose causal pathways of nicotine exposure leading to addiction and include repeated use, the brain and body "getting used to" nicotine, personal weakness, and family influences. A further explanation is that some youths pretend to be addicted to project a "cool" image. These explanations illustrate that some youths see themselves as passive players in the formation of nicotine addiction. The findings can be used in the development of programs to raise youth awareness about nicotine addiction.
PubMed ID
15133917 View in PubMed
Less detail

79 records – page 1 of 8.