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4481 records – page 1 of 449.

3D modeling-based surgical planning in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery--preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90794
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Raappana Antti
Koivukangas John
Pirilä Tapio
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. antti.raappana@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology - radiography - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Endoscopy - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Pituitary Neoplasms - pathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
CONCLUSION: The preoperative three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the pituitary adenoma together with pituitary gland, optic nerves, carotid arteries, and the sphenoid sinuses was adopted for routine use in our institution for all pituitary surgery patients. It gave the surgeon a more profound orientation to the individual surgical field compared with the use of conventional 2D images only. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of 3D surgical planning for pituitary adenoma surgery using readily available resources. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 40 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma were used to construct 3D models to be used in preoperative planning and during the surgery. A freely available, open source program (3D Slicer) downloaded to a conventional personal computer (PC) was applied. RESULTS: The authors present a brief description of the 3D reconstruction-based surgical planning workflow. In addition to the preoperative planning the 3D model was used as a 'road map' during the operation. With the 3D model the surgeon was more confident when opening the sellar wall and when evacuating the tumor from areas in contact with vital structures than when using only conventional 2D images.
PubMed ID
19086197 View in PubMed
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4th annual telemedicine program review. Part 2: United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68966
Source
Telemed Today. 1997 Aug;5(4):30-8, 42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997

[10-year experience in oral hygiene and the frequency and differential degree of caries activity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242792
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1982 Nov-Dec;61(6):12-5
Publication Type
Article

[10 years of translabyrinthine surgery for acoustic neuroma in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26058
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Oct 19;149(43):2901-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1987

[18F]altanserin binding to human 5HT2A receptors is unaltered after citalopram and pindolol challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9398
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2004 Sep;24(9):1037-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Lars H Pinborg
Karen H Adams
Stig Yndgaard
Steen G Hasselbalch
Søren Holm
Heidi Kristiansen
Olaf B Paulson
Gitte M Knudsen
Author Affiliation
Neurobiology Research Unit, University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. pinborg@nru.dk
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2004 Sep;24(9):1037-45
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - pharmacology
Adult
Brain - drug effects - metabolism
Citalopram - pharmacology
Female
Fluorine Radioisotopes - metabolism
Humans
Ketanserin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Male
Pindolol - pharmacology
Prolactin - blood - drug effects
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A - drug effects - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - pharmacology
Tomography, Emission-Computed
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to develop an experimental paradigm for the study of serotonergic neurotransmission in humans using positron emission tomography and the 5-HT2A selective radioligand [18F]altanserin. [18F]altanserin studies were conducted in seven subjects using the bolus/infusion approach designed for attaining steady state in blood and brain 2 hours after the initial [18F]altanserin administration. Three hours after commencement of radiotracer administration, 0.25 mg/kg of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram (Lundbeck, Valby, Denmark), was administered to all subjects as a constant infusion for 20 minutes. To reduce 5-HT1A-mediated autoinhibition of cortical 5-HT release, four of the seven subjects were pretreated with the partial 5-HT1A agonist pindolol for 3 days at an increasing oral dose (25 mg on the day of scanning). In each subject, the baseline condition (120 to 180 minutes) was compared with the stimulated condition (195 to 300 minutes). Despite a pronounced increase in plasma prolactin and two subjects reporting hot flushes compatible with an 5-HT-induced adverse effect, cortical [18F]altanserin binding was insensitive to the citalopram challenge, even after pindolol pretreatment. The biochemical and cellular events possibly affecting the unsuccessful translation of the citalopram/pindolol challenge into a change in 5-HT2A receptor binding of [18F]altanserin are discussed.
PubMed ID
15356424 View in PubMed
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18F FDG-PET/CT evaluation of histological response after neoadjuvant treatment in patients with cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299743
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
May-2019
Author
Stefan Gabrielson
Alejandro Sanchez-Crespo
Fredrik Klevebro
Rimma Axelsson
Jon Albert Tsai
Ove Johansson
Magnus Nilsson
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Esophageal Neoplasms - therapy
Esophagogastric Junction - diagnostic imaging
Esophagus - diagnostic imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Norway
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography - methods
Radiopharmaceuticals
Sweden
Abstract
In most parts of the world, curatively intended treatment for esophageal cancer includes neoadjuvant therapy, either with chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy alone, followed by esophagectomy. Currently 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used for preoperative disease staging, but is not well established in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment.
To evaluate changes in PET parameters in relation to the histological primary tumor response in the surgical specimen in patients randomized to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy.
Patients were randomized between either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy.18F-FDG PET/CT exams were conducted at baseline and following neoadjuvant treatment. Standardized uptake ratio (SUR) values were measured in the primary tumor and compared as regards histological responders and non-responders as well as different treatment arms.
Seventy-nine patients were enrolled and 51 were available for analysis. A significant rate of SUR reduction was observed ( P?=?0.02) in the primary tumor in histological responders compared to non-responders. Changes in SUR were significantly greater in responders following chemoradiotherapy ( P?=?0.02), but not following chemotherapy alone ( P?=?0.49). There was no statistically significant difference in SUR in patients with a complete histological response compared to those with a subtotal response.
Our results are similar to those of previous studies and show that changes in the rate of SUR can be used reliably to differentiate histological responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant treatment with either chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Limitations of current PET technology are likely to restrict the possibility of accurately ruling out limited residual disease.
PubMed ID
30111193 View in PubMed
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(18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography and bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of bone metastases in newly diagnosed, high-risk prostate cancer patients: study protocol for a multicentre, diagnostic test accuracy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276760
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016;16:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Randi F Fonager
Helle D Zacho
Niels C Langkilde
Lars J Petersen
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016;16:10
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Denmark
Fluorine Radioisotopes - chemistry
Humans
Male
Multimodal Imaging
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Risk factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
For decades, planar bone scintigraphy has been the standard practice for detection of bone metastases in prostate cancer and has been endorsed by recent oncology/urology guidelines. It is a sensitive method with modest specificity. (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography has shown improved sensitivity and specificity over bone scintigraphy, but because of methodological issues such as retrospective design and verification bias, the existing level of evidence with (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited. The primary objective is to compare the diagnostic properties of (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone scintigraphy on an individual patient basis.
One hundred forty consecutive, high-risk prostate cancer patients will be recruited from several hospitals in Denmark. Sample size was calculated using Hayen's method for diagnostic comparative studies. This study will be conducted in accordance with recommendations of standards for reporting diagnostic accuracy studies. Eligibility criteria comprise the following: 1) biopsy-proven prostate cancer, 2) PSA = 50 ng/ml (equals a prevalence of bone metastasis of ˜ 50% in the study population on bone scintigraphy), 3) patients must be eligible for androgen deprivation therapy, 4) no current or prior cancer (within the past 5 years), 5) ability to comply with imaging procedures, and 6) patients must not receive any investigational drugs. Planar bone scintigraphy and (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography will be performed within a window of 14 days at baseline. All scans will be repeated after 26 weeks of androgen deprivation therapy, and response of individual lesions will be used for diagnostic classification of the lesions on baseline imaging among responding patients. A response is defined as PSA normalisation or = 80% reduction compared with baseline levels, testosterone below castration levels, no skeletal related events, and no clinical signs of progression. Images are read by blinded nuclear medicine physicians. The protocol is currently recruiting.
To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the largest prospective studies comparing (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography and bone scintigraphy. It is conducted in full accordance with recommendations for diagnostic accuracy trials. It is intended to provide valid documentation for the use of (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography for examination of bone metastasis in the staging of prostate cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26753880 View in PubMed
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(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography after one cycle of chemotherapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: results of a Nordic/US intergroup study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272653
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Karen Juul Mylam
Lale Kostakoglu
Martin Hutchings
Morton Coleman
Dominick Lamonica
Myron S Czuczman
Louis F Diehl
Anne L Nielsen
Paw Jensen
Annika Loft
Helle W Hendel
Victor Iyer
Sirpa Leppä
Sirkku Jyrkkiö
Harald Holte
Mikael Eriksson
Dorte Gillstrøm
Per B Hansen
Marko Seppänen
Karin Hjorthaug
Peter de Nully Brown
Lars M Pedersen
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Denmark
Female
Finland
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - pharmacokinetics
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse - drug therapy - mortality - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multimodal Imaging
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiopharmaceuticals - pharmacokinetics
Survival Rate
Sweden
Tissue Distribution
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated the predictive value of interim positon emission tomography (I-PET) after one course of chemoimmunotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). One hundred and twelve patients with DLBCL were enrolled. All patients had PET/computed tomography (CT) scans performed after one course of chemotherapy (PET-1). I-PET scans were categorized according to International Harmonization Project criteria (IHP), Deauville 5-point scale (D 5PS) with scores 1-3 considered negative (D 5PS > 3) and D 5PS with scores 1-4 considered negative (D 5PS = 5). Ratios of tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) to liver SUVmax were also analyzed. We found no difference in progression-free survival (PFS) between PET-negative and PET-positive patients according to IHP and D 5PS > 3. The 2-year PFS using D 5PS = 5 was 50.9% in the PET-positive group and 84.8% in the PET-negative group (p = 0.002). A tumor/liver SUVmax cut-off of 3.1 to distinguish D 5PS scores of 4 and 5 provided the best prognostic value. PET after one course of chemotherapy was not able to safely discriminate PET-positive and PET-negative patients in different prognostic groups.
PubMed ID
25330442 View in PubMed
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A 20-year prospective study of mortality and causes of death among hospitalized opioid addicts in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87156
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bjornaas Mari A
Bekken Anette S
Ojlert Aasa
Haldorsen Tor
Jacobsen Dag
Rostrup Morten
Ekeberg Oivind
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, N-0407 Oslo, Norway. mabjornaas@gmail.com
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Male
Mathematical Computing
Narcotics - poisoning
Neoplasms - mortality
Opioid-Related Disorders - mortality - rehabilitation
Overdose - mortality - prevention & control
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Street Drugs - poisoning
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To study mortality rate and causes of death among all hospitalized opioid addicts treated for self-poisoning or admitted for voluntary detoxification in Oslo between 1980 and 1981, and to compare their mortality to that of the general population. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted on 185 opioid addicts from all medical departments in Oslo who were treated for either self-poisoning (n = 93, 1980), voluntary detoxification (n = 75, 1980/1981) or both (n = 17). Their median age was 24 years; with a range from 16 to 41, and 53% were males. All deaths that had occurred by the end of 2000 were identified from the Central Population Register. Causes of death were obtained from Statistics Norway. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for mortality, in general, and in particular, for different causes of death. RESULTS: During a period of 20 years, 70 opioid addicts died (37.8%), with a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) equal to 23.6 (95% CI, 18.7-29.9). The SMR remained high during the whole period, ranging from 32.4 in the first five-year period, to 13.4 in the last five-year period. There were no significant differences in SMR between self-poisonings and those admitted for voluntarily detoxification. The registered causes of death were accidents (11.4%), suicide (7.1%), cancer (4.3%), cardiovascular disease (2.9%), other violent deaths (2.9%), other diseases (71.4%). Among the 50 deaths classified as other diseases, the category "drug dependence" was listed in the vast majority of cases (37 deaths, 52.9% of the total). SMRs increased significantly for all causes of death, with the other diseases group having the highest SMR; 65.8 (95% CI, 49.9-86.9). The SMR was 5.4 (95% CI, 1.3-21.5) for cardiovascular diseases, and 4.3 (95% CI, 1.4-13.5) for cancer. The SMR was 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6-26.4) for accidents, 10.7 (95% CI, 4.5-25.8) for suicides, and 28.6 (95% CI, 7.1-114.4) for other violent deaths. CONCLUSION: The risk of death among opioid addicts was significantly higher for all causes of death compared with the general population, implying a poor prognosis over a 20-year period for this young patient group.
PubMed ID
18271956 View in PubMed
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The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104335
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:247-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Tatyana Y Kuznetsova
Viktoria A Korneva
Evgeniya N Bryantseva
Vitaliy S Barkan
Artemy V Orlov
Igor N Posokhov
Anatoly N Rogoza
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Petrozavodsk State University, Petrozavodsk, Russia.
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:247-51
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Circadian Rhythm
Diastole
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Pulse Wave Analysis - standards
Reference Values
Russia
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Systole
Time Factors
Vascular Stiffness
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24812515 View in PubMed
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4481 records – page 1 of 449.