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Academic Achievement of University Students with Dyslexia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274081
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Åke Olofsson
Karin Taube
Astrid Ahl
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Dyslexia - diagnosis - psychology
Education, Nursing
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Multilingualism
Reading
Sweden
Teaching
Universities
Writing
Young Adult
Abstract
Broadened recruitment to higher education is on the agenda in many countries, and it is also widely recognized that the number of dyslexic students entering higher education is increasing. In Sweden, as in many other European countries, higher education institutions are required to accommodate students with dyslexia. The present study focuses on the study outcome for 50 students with diagnosed dyslexia, mainly in teacher education and nurses' training, at three universities in Northern Sweden. The students trusted their own ability to find information on the Internet but mistrusted their own abilities in reading course books and articles in English and in taking notes. The mean rate of study was 23.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits per semester, which is slightly below the national baseline of 26.7. The results show that more than half of the students are examined at a normal rate of study but that about one fifth have a very low rate of study. Messages Most students with dyslexia can compensate for their reading problems. Taking notes during lessons and reading in foreign language may be especially difficult for students with dyslexia. Diagnoses should distinguish between reading comprehension and word decoding. More than half of the students with dyslexia can achieve at a normal rate of study. One-fifth of the students with dyslexia may need a longer period of study than other students.
PubMed ID
26459832 View in PubMed
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Adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme in psychiatric hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129777
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
M. Anttila
M. Välimäki
M. Koivunen
T. Luukkaala
M. Kaila
A. Pitkänen
R. Kontio
Author Affiliation
Finnish Post-Graduate School in Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. minna.anttila@utu.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Internet-based patient support systems are widely assumed to predict a future trend in patient education. Coherent information is still lacking on how patient education is adopted in psychiatric hospitals and how information technology is used in it. Our aim was to describe nurses' adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme and the variables explaining it. The study was based on Rogers' model of the diffusion of innovation. The Internet-based patient education sessions were carried out by nurses on nine acute psychiatric inpatient wards in two Finnish hospitals. They were evaluated with reports and analysed statistically. Out of 100 nurses, 83 adopted the programme during the study period. The nurses fell into Rogers' groups, late majority (72%), laggards (17%), early majority (7%), early adopters (3%) and innovators (1%). Three groups were formed according to their activity: laggards, late majority, adopters (including early majority, early adopters, innovators). There was a statistical difference between the nurses' programme adoption between the two hospitals (P= 0.045): more laggards (65% vs. 35%) and adopters (73% vs. 27%) in the same hospital. The findings help to provide insight into the contexts and settings when adopting information technology programmes in the area of mental health care.
PubMed ID
22070578 View in PubMed
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[Aker and UlevÄl: automatic data processing in education!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229038
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 May 23;78(9):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-1990
Author
K A Bakke
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 May 23;78(9):17
Date
May-23-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Education, Nursing
Humans
Norway
Pilot Projects
PubMed ID
2114920 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions when using different patient education methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121314
Source
J Perioper Pract. 2012 Jul;22(7):226-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Katja Heikkinen
Sanna Salanterä
Tiina Leppänen
Tero Vahlberg
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland. katheik@utu.fi
Source
J Perioper Pract. 2012 Jul;22(7):226-31
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - psychology
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Depression - prevention & control
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Orthopedic Procedures - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Abstract
A randomised controlled trial was used to evaluate elective ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions during internet-based patient education or face-to-face education with a nurse. The internet-based patient education was designed for this study and patients used websites individually based on their needs. Patients in the control group participated individually in face-to-face patient education with a nurse in the ambulatory surgery unit. The theoretical basis for both types of education was the same. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients scored their emotions rather low at intervals throughout the whole surgical process, though their scores also changed during the surgical process. Emotion scores did not decrease after patient education. No differences in patients' emotions were found to result from either of the two different patient education methods.
PubMed ID
22919767 View in PubMed
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An easy to use and affordable home-based personal eHealth system for chronic disease management based on free open source software.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93163
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:83-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Burkow Tatjana M
Vognild Lars K
Krogstad Trine
Borch Njål
Ostengen Geir
Bratvold Astrid
Risberg Marijke Jongsma
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Telemedicine, UNN, Tromsø, Norway. tatjana.m.burkow@telemed.no
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:83-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Computers
Chronic Disease - economics - rehabilitation
Computer Security
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - rehabilitation
Female
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Humans
Internet
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Microcomputers
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - rehabilitation
Remote Consultation
Self Care
Self-Help Groups
Software
Television
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
This paper describes an easy to use home-based eHealth system for chronic disease management. We present the design and implementation of a prototype for home based education, exercises, treatment and following-up, with the TV and a remote control as user interface. We also briefly describe field trials of the system for patients with COPD and diabetes, and their experience with the technology.
PubMed ID
18487712 View in PubMed
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An experience with an online learning environment to support a change in practice in an emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177618
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):107-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Janet Curran-Smith
Shauna Best
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. janet.curransmith@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):107-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods - standards
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Emergency Nursing - education - organization & administration
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Humans
Internet - organization & administration
Nova Scotia
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Online Systems - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation
Social Support
Triage - organization & administration
Abstract
Providing continuing education to support a change in practice for a busy Emergency Department poses a challenge. Factors such as shift work, high patient acuity, and unpredictable patient flow create barriers to traditional methods of delivery of a comprehensive educational experience. This article describes an experience with introducing a change in practice using an innovative Web-based delivery plan. Specific strategies were employed to address presentation of content, application of knowledge, establishment of a shared understanding, and enhancement of communication opportunities. The Web-based learning environment proved to be a successful means of providing nurses with a collaborative learning experience around a new practice issue. This experience also highlighted the need for a new skill set for learners and educators using online learning technologies.
PubMed ID
15520575 View in PubMed
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An exploration of ruling relations and how they organize and regulate nursing education in the high-fidelity patient simulation laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145569
Source
Nurs Inq. 2010 Mar;17(1):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Jacqueline Limoges
Author Affiliation
Georgian College, Barrie, ON, Canada. jlimoges@georgianc.on.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2010 Mar;17(1):58-64
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Knowledge
Manikins
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing, Practical - education
Ontario
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Questionnaires
Sociology, Medical
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
Recently, schools of nursing have adopted the use of high-fidelity human patient simulators in laboratory settings to teach nursing. Although numerous articles document the benefits of teaching undergraduate nursing students in this way, little attention has been paid to the discourses and texts organizing this approach. This institutional ethnography uses the critical feminist sociology of Dorothy E. Smith to examine the literature and interviews with Practical and Bachelor of Science in Nursing students, and their faculty about this experience. The research shows how discourses rationalize and sustain certain processes at the expense of others. For example, ruling discourses such as biomedicine, efficiency, and the relational ontology are activated to construct the simulation lab as part of nursing and nursing education. The analysis also highlights the intended and unintended effects of these discourses on nursing education and discusses how emphasizing nursing knowledges can make the simulation lab a positive place for learning.
PubMed ID
20137031 View in PubMed
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An internet-based learning portfolio in resident education: the KOALA multicentre programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198717
Source
Med Educ. 2000 Jun;34(6):474-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
M F Fung
M. Walker
K F Fung
L. Temple
F. Lajoie
G. Bellemare
S C Bryson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2000 Jun;34(6):474-9
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internet
Internship and Residency
Learning
Obstetrics - education
Pilot Projects
Software
Students, Medical - psychology
Teaching - methods
Abstract
To describe the Computerized Obstetrics and Gynecology Automated Learning Anaalysis (KOALAtrade mark), a multicentre, Internet-based learning portfolio and to determine its effects on residents' perception of their self-directed learning abilities.
The KOALA programme allows residents to record their obstetrical, surgical, ultrasound, and ambulatory patient encounters and to document critical incidents of learning or elements of surprise that arose during these encounters. By prompting the student to reflect on these learning experiences, KOALA encourages residents to articulate questions which can be directly pursued through hypertext links to evidence-based literature. Four Canadian residency training programmes participated in the pilot project, from February to May 1997, using a dynamic relational database with a central server. All participants completed the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale and a learning habits questionnaire. The impact of the KOALA programme on residents' perception of their self-directed learning abilities was measured by comparing KOALA-naive schools (schools 2, 3, and 4) with school 1 (exposed to the KOALA prototype for 1 year). Ordered variables were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and continuous variables with the Student t test (statistical significance P
PubMed ID
10792690 View in PubMed
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Canadian physical therapists' interest in web-based and computer-assisted continuing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176034
Source
Phys Ther. 2005 Mar;85(3):226-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Sunita Mathur
Sue Stanton
W Darlene Reid
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of British Columbia, T325-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2B5. smathur@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Phys Ther. 2005 Mar;85(3):226-37
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
CD-ROM - utilization
Canada
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Education, Continuing - methods
Education, Distance - methods
Humans
Internet - utilization
Logistic Models
Physical Therapy Specialty - classification - education - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
Distance education via computer-assisted learning (CAL), including Web-based and CD-ROM learning, confers a number of advantages compared with traditional learning methods. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the interest of Canadian physical therapists in participating in continuing education using CAL methods and (2) to determine whether interest in CAL was related to type of employment, area of practice, education, computer skill and access, and other demographic variables.
A random sample of Canadian physical therapists and all members of cardiopulmonary interest groups were surveyed.
Of 1,426 survey questionnaires mailed, 69 were returned (58 were unopened and 11 were duplicates). From the remaining 1,357 potential survey responses, 757 responses were received, for an overall response rate of 56%. Seventy-eight percent of the respondents indicated their interest in participating in CAL. Factors associated with interest in CAL included 2 or more hours of Internet access per week, Internet access at both home and work, computer skill, education level, practice area, and belonging to a cardiopulmonary interest group.
The findings indicate a large positive interest in CAL. Increasing CAL continuing education opportunities could increase options for physical therapists to meet professional expectations for continuing competency.
PubMed ID
15733047 View in PubMed
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181 records – page 1 of 19.