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108 records – page 1 of 11.

Adapting work sites for disabled persons using advanced technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216378
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):235-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
T. Malmsborg
Author Affiliation
TeleNova, Stockholm.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):235-44
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Systems
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Employment, Supported
Holistic Health
Humans
Models, organizational
Patient care team
Rehabilitation, Vocational - instrumentation - methods
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Vocational Guidance
Workplace
Abstract
This paper describes the technical approach in the TUFFA (Technology Procurement for Disabled in Working Life) project and a model for cooperating areas of competence based on a holistic view of the individual's abilities, the environmental conditions at the work site, and technical solutions.
PubMed ID
7790167 View in PubMed
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[A model for estimation of productivity and costs at a deparment of histopathology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208966
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Mar 24;159(13):1935-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-1997
Author
B. Bjerregaard
S. Hannibal
Author Affiliation
Patologisk-anatomisk institut, Amtssygehuset i Herlev.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Mar 24;159(13):1935-40
Date
Mar-24-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy - economics
Computer Systems
Costs and Cost Analysis
Denmark
Efficiency
Histological Techniques - economics
Humans
Laboratories, Hospital - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Models, Economic
Pathology Department, Hospital - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Specimen Handling - economics
Workload
Abstract
Two cost calculation models were used. The "top down" model calculated an average cost of all investigations; this proved suitable for the calculation of the costs of autopsies and electron microscopical specimens. The "bottom up" model calculated the cost of an individual investigation, depending on the resources used in handling each particular specimen; it was necessary to adopt this model for specimens sent for microscopy. Information about the type of specimen and technical details were registered in a computer system. Production was registered in points and the costs were distributed between the clinical departments. The study showed that the cost of the histological specimens varied considerably depending on the material received from the clinical departments. A model using points for technical details in a department of cyto- and histopathology is suitable for calculating production and cost.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Jun 9;159(24):3798-99214058
PubMed ID
9123631 View in PubMed
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[An automated computer system for the differential diagnosis and laser treatment of benign neoplasms and tumor-like masses in the oral cavity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205280
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1998;77(3):61-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
N A Zhizhina
A A Prokhonchukov
V F Ermolov
V Iu Pelkovskii
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1998;77(3):61-5
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Systems
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - methods
Diagnosis, Differential
Expert Systems
Humans
Laser Therapy - methods
Mouth Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Russia
Abstract
Automated computer system for differential diagnosis and defining the indications for pathogenetic therapy is described, which was used in 2816 patients and was effective in 97% of cases. The system includes computer-regulated Lancet surgical lasers (wavelength 10.6 microns, power 60 W, frequency 0.05-1.0 Hz) and Optodan physiotherapeutic laser (wavelength 0.85 micron, power 4 W, frequency 0.08-3 kHz).
PubMed ID
9643118 View in PubMed
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[An improvement in information support in the interests of the epidemiological health welfare of the troops].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216762
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1994 Dec;(12):37-42, 80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
I A Borisenko
Iu E Viazovichenko
V I Gudkov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1994 Dec;(12):37-42, 80
Date
Dec-1994
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing - organization & administration - standards
Computer Systems
Epidemiology - organization & administration
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration - standards
Military Hygiene - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
The information acquisition, decision-making and control system must be the basic tool for optimizing the information procedures in the interests of sanitary-epidemiological welfare of troops. It's necessary to make a thorough revision of the existing account and record documentation in order to study its value. Each pattern of record cards must be scientifically substantiated depending on its effectiveness for further decision making. It's necessary to exclude all futile information. Record and account procedures must be automated and computerized throughout all chains of command beginning from a single military unit. Special systems must be developed for this matter. Realization of these goals will completely assure the monitoring of health status indices of servicemen and the environmental situation, as well as monitoring of risk factors influence upon the health of personnel.
PubMed ID
7900317 View in PubMed
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Application of an essential data set based computer system in support of maternal and child care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36585
Source
Int J Biomed Comput. 1992 Oct;31(3-4):159-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
K. Moidu
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Informatics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int J Biomed Comput. 1992 Oct;31(3-4):159-75
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Computer Systems
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Management Information Systems
Maternal Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Software
Sweden
Abstract
A simple functional application software has been developed to support care providers in information management related to perinatal care activities, family planning encounters and the immunization of infants. This was distributed to some sites and was implemented with no organizational change, though the methods differed. An early assessment of the software after a period of implementation is made based on the observations and experiences reported. This is presented in a framework outlined earlier as the OUST model. The systems objective to enhance the value of information was observed to have been partially achieved. The utility to the users is observed in the ability of the end-users at the sites to identify the local community needs and adopt accordingly suitable strategies. The social impact was seen in the assistance provided by the sentinel action of the system in tracking dropouts from the immunization programme at a site, thereby ensuring quality in care and also economic benefits. From a technical standpoint, the application software was small yet functional and in it were incorporated features that ensured data quality. The application software was designed to generate a unique identity code to assist in follow-up of the target population. Based on the data entered it compiled reports to meet administrative requirements, reports that gave the care providers feedback and lists to coordinate in the follow-up of the target population. The application software is a common data collection tool that can assist in building a data registry for health outcomes research.
PubMed ID
1428214 View in PubMed
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Audit of critical care: aims, uses, costs and limitations of a Canadian system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224248
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 Mar;39(3):260-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
R J Byrick
G M Caskennette
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1992 Mar;39(3):260-9
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer Systems
Costs and Cost Analysis
Critical Care - organization & administration
Database Management Systems
Databases, Factual
Decision Making
Diagnosis
Disease
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care - organization & administration
Length of Stay
Medical Audit - economics - methods
Medical Laboratory Science
Medical Records
Nursing Care - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Systems Analysis
Utilization Review
Abstract
We describe an audit system used in our Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) during 1989-90. The system emphasizes the integration of data acquisition (database function) with the analysis and use of data (decision function). Resource input (human and technological) included patient demographics, diagnoses, complications, procedures, severity of illness (Apache II), therapeutic interventions (TISS), and nursing workload (GRASP and TISS). The output was assessed by survival, length of stay and ability to return home. The annual operating cost for 277 admissions (249 patients) to this ICU was $7,333. The implementation costs were $58,261 including program development and computer purchases. Non-survivors of ICU and hospital had higher Apache II scores on admission (P less than 0.0001) and longer ICU length of stay (P less than 0.05) than survivors. The nursing workload (both TISS and GRASP) on the day of admission and the last day in ICU were greater in non-survivors (P less than 0.0001) than survivors. Limitations of this audit system included the delay (6-9 mos) from ICU admission until data entry, the large number of diagnostic groups in the ICD.9.CM classification, and lack of a documented cause/effect relationship between interventions and complications. This audit system was more useful for utilization management than for quality assurance purposes.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1992 Mar;39(3):210-31551150
PubMed ID
1551158 View in PubMed
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[A unified computerized data-base information system on brain trauma and diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205721
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 1998 Jan-Mar;(1):47-53
Publication Type
Article

Brain operations guided by real-time two-dimensional ultrasound: new possibilities as a result of improved image quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18938
Source
Neurosurgery. 2002 Aug;51(2):402-11; discussion 411-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Geirmund Unsgaard
Aage Gronningsaeter
Steinar Ommedal
Toril A Nagelhus Hernes
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway. geirmund.unsgard@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Neurosurgery. 2002 Aug;51(2):402-11; discussion 411-2
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - surgery
Brain Neoplasms - diagnosis - surgery - ultrasonography
Cerebral Hemorrhage - diagnosis - surgery - ultrasonography
Cerebrovascular Disorders - diagnosis - surgery - ultrasonography
Computer Systems
Hematoma - diagnosis - surgery - ultrasonography
Humans
Image Enhancement
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surgery, Computer-Assisted
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In 1995, a project was initiated in Trondheim, Norway, to investigate various possibilities for more frequent use of ultrasound in brain surgery. Since that time, the quality of ultrasonic images has improved considerably through technological adjustment of parameters. The objective of the present study was to explore essential clinical parameters required for the successful use of ultrasonic guidance in brain surgery. METHODS: During the study period, several surgical setups designed to optimize the use of intraoperative real-time two-dimensional ultrasonic imaging were explored. These included various positions of the ultrasound probe in relation to both the operation cavity and the lesion, as well as the position of the operation channel in relation to the gravity line. RESULTS: All lesions from the latest period (1997-2001; n = 114) were depicted well by ultrasound imaging, with the exception of two cases. High image quality and direct image guidance of the tool were maintained best throughout the operation by imaging through an intact dura and at an angle relative to a vertical operation channel. All tumor operations were performed without complications, and ultrasound imaging was found to be an important factor in the detection of remaining tumor tissue at the conclusion of surgery. For 14 low vascular tumors, the operation was guided only by ultrasound imaging. No bleeding complications occurred. A method of minimally invasive ultrasound-guided evacuation of hematomas was developed. In 19 patients, the method was found to be efficient (i.e., >90% of the hematoma was evacuated) and without complications, except for one patient who experienced rebleeding. CONCLUSION: With proper planning and surgical setup, ultrasound imaging may provide acceptable image quality for use in image-guided brain operations.
PubMed ID
12182778 View in PubMed
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Cardiac arrest during anaesthesia. A computer-aided study in 250,543 anaesthetics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38371
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1988 Nov;32(8):653-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
G L Olsson
B. Hallén
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia, St Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1988 Nov;32(8):653-64
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anesthesia - adverse effects - mortality
Anesthetics - adverse effects
Child
Computer Systems
Female
Heart Arrest - etiology - mortality
Hospital Information Systems
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Operating Room Information Systems
Sweden
Abstract
With the aid of a computer-based anaesthetic record-keeping system, all cardiac arrests during anaesthesia at the Karolinska Hospital between July 1967 and December 1984 were retrieved. There were a total of 170 cardiac arrests and 250,543 anaesthetics in the data file, which gives an incidence of 6.8 cardiac arrests per 10,000 anaesthetics. Sixty patients died, constituting a mortality of 2.4 per 10,000 anaesthetics: 42 were considered as inevitable deaths (rupture of aortic or cerebral aneurysm, multitrauma, etc.); 13 cases of cardiac arrest were considered as non-anaesthetic, i.e. complications due to surgery and other procedures. Nine of these patients died. 115 cases of cardiac arrest were considered as caused by the anaesthetic and nine of these patients died. Thus mortality caused by anaesthesia was 0.3 per 10,000 anaesthetics. The most common cause of cardiac arrest due to anaesthesia was hypoxia because of ventilatory problems (27 patients), postsuccinylcholine asystole (23 patients) and post-induction hypotension (14 patients). The highest mortality was seen when spinal or epidural anaesthetics were given to patients with impaired physical status including hypovolaemia. The incidence of cardiac arrest has declined considerably during the period studied, and this coincides with an increasing number of qualified anaesthetists employed in the department during the same period.
PubMed ID
3213390 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular malformations and maternal exposure to video display terminals during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229495
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1990 Mar;6(1):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
J. Tikkanen
O P Heinonen
K. Kurppa
K. Rantala
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1990 Mar;6(1):61-6
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Systems
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fetal Viability - radiation effects
Finland
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The possible effects of working with video display terminals (VDTs) during pregnancy on the occurrence of cardiovascular malformations in the offspring was studied in 500 cases and 1055 controls. The cases represented all registered cardiovascular malformations reported in Finland during 1982-84, excluding those with chromosomal anomaly or known genetic syndrome. The controls were randomly selected from all babies born during the same period. Both the case and control mothers were interviewed by midwives using a structured questionnaire approximately three months after delivery. In this interview the mother's occupation, job description and employer during the first trimester were noted, as were large number of other exposures to chemical and physical factors. An industrial hygienist examined all these records for information indicating exposure to VDTs, unaware of case/control status. Work with VDTs during the first trimester of pregnancy was ascertained for 30 case mothers (6.0%, 30/500) and 53 control mothers (5.0%, 53/1055). In logistic regression analysis maternal exposure to VDTs for at least 20h a week during the first trimester of pregnancy showed a point estimate of odds ratio of 1.4 with 95% confidence limits of 0.5 and 3.8, when adjusted for age and alcohol use. Maternal exposure to VDTs was not associated with indicators of fetal growth such as birthweight, placental weight or length of gestation.
PubMed ID
2344877 View in PubMed
Less detail

108 records – page 1 of 11.