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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Approaches for certification of electronic prescription software.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206219
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1997 Dec;47(3):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Niinimäki
J. Forsström
Author Affiliation
Health Care Informatics Centre of Excellence, Satakunta Hospital District, Pori, Finland.
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1997 Dec;47(3):175-82
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Certification
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Drug Prescriptions - standards - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Finland
Humans
Software - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Abstract
The proper management of drug treatment is essential, since adverse drug reactions are common reasons of hospitalisations. Expenditure on drug therapy has also been growing faster than any other aspect of health care in many countries. Savings and quality improvements in drug treatment could be achieved with computerised prescribing. In this paper, the architecture of an electronic prescription system is described in the light of software certification and registration. An electronic prescription system is an example of a system supporting shared care and therefore it should be person based, integrated, secure and confidential and data should be shared among health care institutions. The system architecture shares the idea of a virtual patient record and a smart card will be used as a key to prescription data located on the network. The certification and registration of medical software is a difficult and costly procedure. Ensuring the quality of software can be based on; certification of development process, voluntary evaluation, and post-market surveillance. Voluntary evaluation practice would be a precious tool for both the customers and software developers, and it would also be an invaluable source of information in terms of developing new software.
PubMed ID
9513006 View in PubMed
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[Carelessness when university and county process sensitive personal information].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114645
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Mar 13-19;110(11):566-7
Publication Type
Article

Ethical considerations in sharing personal information on computer data sets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200098
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Nov;45:2563-5, 2575-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
A J Kirshen
C. Ho
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Nov;45:2563-5, 2575-7
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - legislation & jurisprudence
Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1982 Jul-Aug;97(4):332-457111656
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1986;23(3):293-53764487
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 15;155(12):1697-7098976336
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1995 Nov 23;333(21):1419-227477127
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Aug 15;155(4):387-918752063
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Nov 24;270(20):2487-938192748
PubMed ID
10587755 View in PubMed
Less detail

A framework for an institutional high level security policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192425
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2001 Apr-Jun;3(2):E14
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Ilioudis
G. Pangalos
Author Affiliation
Informatics Laboratory, Faculty of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54006, Greece; iliou@eng.auth.gr
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2001 Apr-Jun;3(2):E14
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Confidentiality - standards
Databases as Topic - classification - legislation & jurisprudence
Education, Professional - legislation & jurisprudence
Europe
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Internet - standards
Medical Informatics Computing - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Organizational Policy
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Abstract
The Internet provides many advantages when used for interaction and data sharing among health care providers, patients, and researchers. However, the advantages provided by the Internet come with a significantly greater element of risk to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information. It is therefore essential that Health Care Establishments processing and exchanging medical data use an appropriate security policy.
To develop a High Level Security Policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet, which is a set of high-level statements intended to guide Health Care Establishment personnel who process and manage sensitive health care information.
We developed the policy based on a detailed study of the existing framework in the EU countries, USA, and Canada, and on consultations with users in the context of the Intranet Health Clinic project. More specifically, this paper has taken into account the major directives, technical reports, law, and recommendations that are related to the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data, and the protection of privacy and medical data on the Internet.
We present a High Level Security Policy for Health Care Establishments, which includes a set of 7 principles and 45 guidelines detailed in this paper. The proposed principles and guidelines have been made as generic and open to specific implementations as possible, to provide for maximum flexibility and adaptability to local environments. The High Level Security Policy establishes the basic security requirements that must be addressed to use the Internet to safely transmit patient and other sensitive health care information.
The High Level Security Policy is primarily intended for large Health Care Establishments in Europe, USA, and Canada. It is clear however that the general framework presented here can only serve as reference material for developing an appropriate High Level Security Policy in a specific implementation environment. When implemented in specific environments, these principles and guidelines must also be complemented by measures, which are more specific. Even when a High Level Security Policy already exists in an institution, it is advisable that the management of the Health Care Establishment periodically revisits it to see whether it should be modified or augmented.
Notes
Cites: Med Inform Internet Med. 2000 Oct-Dec;25(4):265-7311198188
PubMed ID
11720956 View in PubMed
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[Health care registries a community asset. Centralized registries of health care data can save life and improve quality of life]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20811
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 1;96(35):3668-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1999
Author
M. Rosén
A. Ericson
Author Affiliation
Epidemiologiskt centrum, Socialstyrelsen, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 1;96(35):3668-73
Date
Sep-1-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Databases
English Abstract
Epidemiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Informed consent
Quality of Life
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The article is a review of how national epidemiological data bases in Sweden can be used for research and statistical purposes. Over 500 major applications from research groups and others are dealt with annually by the National Cancer, Hospital discharge, Medical birth, and Cause-of-death registries, providing essential data for studies which have yielded well over a thousand peer-reviewed scientific papers. In over 40 years' Swedish experience of administering the registration of sensitive patient-specific information on diseases, there has not been a single case of data misuse. It is concluded that the benefits of national epidemiological registries far outweigh the risks and marginal costs of maintaining them.
PubMed ID
10492575 View in PubMed
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Health information privacy: without confidentiality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218894
Source
Int J Biomed Comput. 1994 Feb;35 Suppl:97-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
D M Robinson
Author Affiliation
Division of Diversecure Corporation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Biomed Comput. 1994 Feb;35 Suppl:97-104
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer Communication Networks
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Data Collection - legislation & jurisprudence
Forms and Records Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Agencies - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Health services
Humans
Information Systems - legislation & jurisprudence
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Medical Records - legislation & jurisprudence
Organizational Policy
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health
Public Policy
Abstract
The relation between privacy and confidentiality is critically discussed. The need to be able to process data for epidemiology and management is presented. Too often the protection of privacy is considered to be a synonym of denying access to the patient's data. The function of the Canadian National Institute for Health Information is mentioned as as example of a wider trend to have a national focal point in the development of national databanks and for administering health information networks. Protection of privacy is considered to be the most important threat to the effectiveness of such networks.
PubMed ID
8188428 View in PubMed
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Health privacy in Canada--shedding light on murky waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178585
Source
Health Law Can. 2004 Jun;24(4):73-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004

Health services research and personal health information: privacy concerns, new legislation and beyond.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203585
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Dec 1;159(11):1378-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1998

23 records – page 1 of 3.