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104 records – page 1 of 11.

Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaare Meier
Lone Nikolajsen
Morten Flink
Ronnie Simonsen
Ioanna Milidou
Troels Staehelin Jensen
Jens Christian Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Anesthesiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; ITmedico, Aarhus, Denmark; Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Chronic Pain - therapy
Computer Security
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Employment
Humans
Internet
Neuralgia - drug therapy - therapy
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Software
Spinal Cord Stimulation - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
?? Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is increasingly gaining widespread use as a treatment for chronic pain. A widely used electronic registry could play a pivotal role in improving this complex and cost-?intensive treatment. We aimed to construct a comprehensive, universally available data base for SCS.
?? The design considerations behind a new online data base for SCS are presented; basic structure, technical issues, research applications, and future perspectives are described.
?? The Aarhus Neuromodulation Database covers core SCS treatment parameters, including procedure-?related details and complications, and features recording of key success parameters such as pain intensity, work status, and quality of life. It combines easy access to patient information with exhaustive data extraction options, and it can readily be adapted and expanded to suit different needs, including other neuromodulation treatment modalities.
?? We believe that the data base described in this article offers a powerful and versatile data collection tool suited for both clinicians and researchers in the field. The basic data base structure is immediately available on a no?-cost basis, and we invite our colleagues to make use of the data base as part of the efforts to further the field of neuromodulation.
PubMed ID
22882331 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access and authorisation in a Glocal e-Health Policy context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180735
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2004
Author
Richard E Scott
Penny Jennett
Maryann Yeo
Author Affiliation
Global e-Health Research and Training Program, G204 Health Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. rescott@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Date
Mar-31-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Canada
Computer Security
Health Policy
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration - standards
Security Measures
World Health
Abstract
Challenges to the development of appropriate yet adaptable policy and tools for security of the individual patient electronic health record (EHR) are proving to be significant. Compounding this is the unique capability of e-health to transgress all existing geo-political and other barriers. Initiatives to develop and advance policy, standards, and tools in relation to EHR access control and authorisation management must address this capability. Currently policy development initiatives take place largely in an isolated manner. This jeopardises the potential of e-health because decisions made in one jurisdiction might hamper, even prevent, an e-health opportunity in another. This paper places access and authorisation issues in an overall policy context through describing current Canadian initiatives. The National Initiative for Telehealth (NIFTE) Guidelines project is developing a framework of national guidelines for telehealth. The Policy and Peer Permission (PPP) project is developing a unique tool that provides persistent protection of data. The new corporate body 'Infoway' is developing a pan-Canadian electronic health record solution. Finally, the Glocal e-Health Policy initiative is developing a tool with which to identify and describe the inter-relationships of e-health issues amongst policy levels, themes, and actors.
PubMed ID
15066556 View in PubMed
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Adoption of security and confidentiality features in an operational community health information network: the Comox Valley experience--case example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204710
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1998 Mar;49(1):81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
J R Moehr
J G McDaniel
Author Affiliation
School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1998 Mar;49(1):81-7
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Clinical Laboratory Information Systems
Community Networks
Computer Communication Networks
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Database Management Systems
Databases as Topic
Group Practice
Hospital Information Systems
Hospitals, General
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Abstract
Since 1993, a budding community health information network (CHIN) has been in operation in the Comox Valley in Canada. A general hospital and three multi-doctor clinics are linked electronically. The clinics operate without paper charts using a comprehensive clinic information system. The link is provided by RSALink, a commercial message exchange service, based on Health Link, a system developed at the University of Victoria (McDaniel et al., Can. Med. Inform. 1 (1994) 40-41; McDaniel, Dissertation, University of Victoria, Canada, 1994). Health Link is a highly adaptable message exchange service with rich functionality. Despite this, the system is used exclusively to receive laboratory results transmitted by the hospital's laboratory system (RSAStat). The results are deposited in the patient data base of a commercial clinic information system (CliniCare). This case is instructive because the users' selection of services available through Health Link allows us to observe the preferences in this informational sophisticated environment. Laboratory data transmission is appreciated as highly beneficial. The reliability, security and ample privacy protection and authentication features of Health Link, in contrast, are used in a black box mode and are not consciously exploited. This is consistent with our experience of the use of other systems which have operated for a substantial time, essentially without serious protection features. Our experience suggests that security and confidentiality features are exploited only to the extent that they do not require additional effort or conscientious intervention. This puts the system provider in the difficult position of either offering interactive systems that nobody will use, or providing automated features that nobody is aware of and that are therefore not used to full advantage--if at all.
PubMed ID
9723805 View in PubMed
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An easy to use and affordable home-based personal eHealth system for chronic disease management based on free open source software.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93163
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:83-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Burkow Tatjana M
Vognild Lars K
Krogstad Trine
Borch Njål
Ostengen Geir
Bratvold Astrid
Risberg Marijke Jongsma
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Telemedicine, UNN, Tromsø, Norway. tatjana.m.burkow@telemed.no
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:83-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Computers
Chronic Disease - economics - rehabilitation
Computer Security
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - rehabilitation
Female
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Humans
Internet
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Microcomputers
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - rehabilitation
Remote Consultation
Self Care
Self-Help Groups
Software
Television
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
This paper describes an easy to use home-based eHealth system for chronic disease management. We present the design and implementation of a prototype for home based education, exercises, treatment and following-up, with the TV and a remote control as user interface. We also briefly describe field trials of the system for patients with COPD and diabetes, and their experience with the technology.
PubMed ID
18487712 View in PubMed
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Approaches for certification of electronic prescription software.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206219
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1997 Dec;47(3):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Niinimäki
J. Forsström
Author Affiliation
Health Care Informatics Centre of Excellence, Satakunta Hospital District, Pori, Finland.
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1997 Dec;47(3):175-82
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Certification
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Drug Prescriptions - standards - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Finland
Humans
Software - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Abstract
The proper management of drug treatment is essential, since adverse drug reactions are common reasons of hospitalisations. Expenditure on drug therapy has also been growing faster than any other aspect of health care in many countries. Savings and quality improvements in drug treatment could be achieved with computerised prescribing. In this paper, the architecture of an electronic prescription system is described in the light of software certification and registration. An electronic prescription system is an example of a system supporting shared care and therefore it should be person based, integrated, secure and confidential and data should be shared among health care institutions. The system architecture shares the idea of a virtual patient record and a smart card will be used as a key to prescription data located on the network. The certification and registration of medical software is a difficult and costly procedure. Ensuring the quality of software can be based on; certification of development process, voluntary evaluation, and post-market surveillance. Voluntary evaluation practice would be a precious tool for both the customers and software developers, and it would also be an invaluable source of information in terms of developing new software.
PubMed ID
9513006 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Methods Inf Med. 1997 Aug;36(3):221-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
D S Stodolsky
Author Affiliation
Euromath Center, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. david@math.ku.dk
Source
Methods Inf Med. 1997 Aug;36(3):221-32
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Contact Tracing - methods
Database Management Systems
Denmark - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Abstract
The very long latency between HIV infection and the appearance of AIDS imposes extensive information processing requirements on partner notification efforts. The apparently contradictory needs of maintaining the right to privacy of infected persons, while simultaneously providing information to persons at risk of infection, impose severe security requirements. These requirements can be satisfied by a Contagion Management System based upon networked personal computers of a kind now becoming available. Security of information is based upon cryptographic protocols that implement anonymous partner notification (contact tracing) and Privacy-Preserving Negotiation. The proposed scheme has the properties that contact tracing is automated, contacts remain anonymous, sensitive information is kept private, and risk-conscious users act as if sensitive information was public. Optimal health protection can thus be obtained while securing informational rights.
PubMed ID
9293722 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beyond the EPR: complementary roles of the hospital-wide electronic health record and clinical departmental systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150329
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:29
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Eivind Vedvik
Aksel H Tjora
Arild Faxvaag
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Research Centre for Electronic Patient Records, Faculty of medicine Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Medical-technical research centre, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway. eivind.vedvik@gmail.com
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:29
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Computers
Computer Security
Decision Support Techniques
Documentation - methods
Hospital Departments
Hospital Information Systems - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Informatics Applications
Medical Order Entry Systems - organization & administration
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Software
Abstract
Many hospital departments have implemented small clinical departmental systems (CDSs) to collect and use patient data for documentation as well as for other department-specific purposes. As hospitals are implementing institution-wide electronic patient records (EPRs), the EPR is thought to be integrated with, and gradually substitute the smaller systems. Many EPR systems however fail to support important clinical workflows. Also, successful integration of systems has proven hard to achieve. As a result, CDSs are still in widespread use. This study was conducted to see which tasks are supported by CDSs and to compare this to the support offered by the EPR.
Semi-structured interviews with users of 16 clinicians using 15 different clinical departmental systems (CDS) at a Medium-sized University hospital in Norway. Inductive analysis of transcriptions from the audio taped interviews.
The roles of CDSs were complementary to those of the hospital-wide EPR system. The use of structured patient data was a characteristic feature. This facilitated quality development and supervision, tasks that were poorly supported by the EPR system. The structuring of the data also improved filtering of information to better support clinical decision-making. Because of the high value of the structured patient data, the users put much effort in maintaining their integrity and representativeness. Employees from the departments were also engaged in the funding, development, implementation and maintenance of the systems.
Clinical departmental systems are vital to the activities of a clinical hospital department. The development, implementation and clinical use of such systems can be seen as bottom-up, user-driven innovations.
Notes
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;124:298-30317108540
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2007;7:1417565667
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2008;8:218186935
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Feb;68(3):519-2519054601
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 1999;68:25-3010724881
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2006 Mar;26(3):323-3216503712
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Dec 8;323(7325):1344-811739222
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2002 Dec 18;68(1-3):27-3712467788
Cites: Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):428-3214534645
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1998 Mar 15;128(6):460-69499330
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 1998 Oct-Dec;52(1-3):3-279848399
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2000 Sep;58-59:157-6610978918
PubMed ID
19523198 View in PubMed
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BioHealth--the need for security and identity management standards in eHealth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166626
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;121:327-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Claudia Hildebrand
Peter Pharow
Rolf Engelbrecht
Bernd Blobel
Mario Savastano
Asbjorn Hovsto
Author Affiliation
GSF-Research Centre for Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Germany. hildebra@gsf.de
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;121:327-36
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biometry
Computer Communication Networks - standards
Computer Security - standards
Confidentiality
Germany
Humans
Italy
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Norway
Patient Identification Systems - standards
Systems Integration
Telemedicine - standards
Abstract
The experience gained in these last years and the several lesson learned have clearly shown that eHealth is more than just a simple change from paper records to electronic records. It necessitates a change of paradigms, on the one hand and the use of new technologies and introduction of new procedures on the other. Interoperability becomes a crucial issue. Security and confidentiality are vital for the acceptance of the new approaches and for the support of eHealth. Shared care and across-border interactions require a reliable and stable normative framework based on the application of standardized solutions, which are often not yet sufficiently known, diffused and implemented. Feeling this gap, a group of international experts in the medical area proposed to the EC the BioHealth project whose main aim is to create awareness about standardization in eHealth and to facilitate its practical implementation. The project will address all the stakeholders concerning their respective domain. It will evaluate the socio-economic and cultural aspects concerning eHealth with particular reference to the growing introduction of emerging technologies such as health cards, biometrics, RFID (radio-frequency identification) and NFC (Near field communication) tags. By providing information and expert advice on standardization and best practices it will raise the acceptance on standardization. Furthermore, the project will deeply approach the ethical and accessibility issues connected to identity management in eHealth, which -together with privacy- represent probably the most significant obstacles for the wide diffusion of eHealth procedures.
PubMed ID
17095831 View in PubMed
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Building a sustainable system: the making of the WTIS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150836
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;12 Spec No Ontario:43-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Steve Hall
Rami Thabet
Mark Dummett
Author Affiliation
William Osler Health Centre.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;12 Spec No Ontario:43-51
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Diffusion of Innovation
Efficiency, Organizational
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Neoplasms
Ontario
Program Development - methods
Quality Control
Registries
Systems Integration
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Building Ontario's Wait Time Information System (WTIS) was one of the largest and most complex technology projects Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) had ever taken on. Increasing public concern about wait times and the lack of adequate tools to provide a clear or accurate picture of provincial wait times had led to a sense of urgency for the province to report wait time data. While healthcare providers and the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care (MOHLTC) sought to address timely access to care, the challenges to develop a suitable information management/information technology (IM/IT) solution within aggressive timelines were significant. For the WTIS project, success was defined by the ability to deliver a tool to capture wait time data that addressed business and clinical needs and by providing individuals with the ability to use the tool and its data to improve access to care.
PubMed ID
19458509 View in PubMed
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104 records – page 1 of 11.