Skip header and navigation

Refine By

104 records – page 1 of 11.

Surgery was successful--but how did it go for the patient? Experiences from and hopes for the Swedish Perioperative Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273906
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2015 Jul;32(7):453-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015

[Confidentiality is guaranteed in the survey of physicians' drug prescriptions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209491
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 29;94(5):317
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-1997
Author
H. Behrendtz
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 29;94(5):317
Date
Jan-29-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Sweden
PubMed ID
9053665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healthcare information: opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211698
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1996 Jul-Aug;5(4):3
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. LeBlanc
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1996 Jul-Aug;5(4):3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Data Collection
Disease
Humans
Privacy
Registries
PubMed ID
10159551 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(8-9):213-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(8-9):213-5
Date
1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security
Confidentiality
English Abstract
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Scandinavia
Sweden
Abstract
Population-based cancer registration has existed in the five Nordic countries for 35-50 years. With the exception of Sweden, the Nordic cancer registries not only collect figures of annual incidence, but also serve as institutes for cancer statistics and epidemiological research. The article gives an account of the scope of research based on cancer registries in the Nordic countries, as illustrated by examples from Finland.
PubMed ID
8414950 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Honesty and computerized medical records--good safety].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181427
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 22;101(4):313-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2004
Author
Olle Svensson
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 22;101(4):313-4
Date
Jan-22-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Humans
Malpractice
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
14979014 View in PubMed
Less detail

Iceland's medical database is insecure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201654
Source
BMJ. 1999 Jul 3;319(7201):59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-1999
Author
R. Anderson
Source
BMJ. 1999 Jul 3;319(7201):59
Date
Jul-3-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security
Databases, Factual
Humans
Iceland
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
PubMed ID
10390484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Facebook use among early-career veterinarians in Ontario, Canada (March to May 2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115073
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013 Apr 15;242(8):1083-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2013
Author
Cynthia A Weijs
Jason B Coe
Emily Christofides
Amy Muise
Serge Desmarais
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. cweijs@uoguelph.ca
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013 Apr 15;242(8):1083-90
Date
Apr-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Data Collection - methods
Humans
Ontario
Social Media - utilization
Veterinarians
Abstract
To explore the nature and content of information publicly posted to Facebook by early-career veterinarians.
Cross-sectional descriptive study. Sample-352 early-career veterinarians.
Publicly accessible Facebook profiles were searched online from March to May 2010 for profiles of early-career veterinarians (graduates from 2004 through 2009) registered with the College of Veterinarians of Ontario, Canada. The content of veterinarians' Facebook profiles was evaluated and then categorized as low, medium, or high exposure in terms of the information a veterinarian had publicly posted to Facebook. Through the use of content analysis, high-exposure profiles were further analyzed for publicly posted information that may have posed risks to an individual's or the profession's public image.
Facebook profiles for 352 of 494 (71%) registered early-career veterinarians were located. One-quarter (25%) of profiles were categorized as low exposure (ie, high privacy), over half (54%) as medium exposure (i.e., medium privacy), and 21% as high exposure (i.e., low privacy). Content analysis of the high-exposure profiles identified publicly posted information that may pose risks to an individual's or the profession's reputation, including breaches of client confidentiality, evidence of substance abuse, and demeaning comments toward others.
Almost a quarter of veterinarians' Facebook profiles viewed in the present study contained publicly available content of a questionable nature that could pose a risk to the reputation of the individual, his or her practice, or the veterinary profession. The increased use of Facebook and all types of social media points to the need for raised awareness by veterinarians of all ages of how to manage one's personal and professional identities online to minimize reputation risks for individuals and their practices and to protect the reputation and integrity of the veterinary profession.
PubMed ID
23547671 View in PubMed
Less detail

[IT standard (information technology)--the great collaboration project].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208658
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Apr 22;85(7):30-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-1997

[Personal data used in medical research].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187047
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Nov 20;122(28):2715-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2002
Author
Bjørn Straume
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Tromsø 9037 Tromsø. bjorn.straume@ism.uit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Nov 20;122(28):2715-6
Date
Nov-20-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Norway
Registries
Research Subjects - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
12523092 View in PubMed
Less detail

Privacy vs usability: a qualitative exploration of patients' experiences with secure Internet communication with their general practitioner.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174000
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2005;7(2):e15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Aksel Tjora
Trung Tran
Arild Faxvaag
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Research Centre for Electronic Patient Records (NSEP), Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway. akselht@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2005;7(2):e15
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Humans
Internet - utilization
Interviews as Topic
Norway
Patients
Physicians, Family
Abstract
Direct electronic communication between patients and physicians has the potential to empower patients and improve health care services. Communication by regular email is, however, considered a security threat in many countries and is not recommended. Systems which offer secure communication have now emerged. Unlike regular email, secure systems require that users authenticate themselves. However, the authentication steps per se may become barriers that reduce use.
The objective was to study the experiences of patients who were using a secure electronic communication system. The focus of the study was the users' privacy versus the usability of the system.
Qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 patients who used a secure communication system (MedAxess) to exchange personal health information with their primary care physician.
Six main themes were identified from the interviews: (1) supporting simple questions, (2) security issues, (3) aspects of written communication, (4) trust in the physician, (5) simplicity of MedAxess, and (6) trouble using the system. By using the system, about half of the patients (8/15) experienced easier access to their physician, with whom they tended to solve minor health problems and elaborate on more complex illness experiences. Two thirds of the respondents (10/15) found that their physician quickly responded to their MedAxess requests. As a result of the security barriers, the users felt that the system was secure. However, due to the same barriers, the patients considered the log-in procedure cumbersome, which had considerable negative impact on the actual use of the system.
Despite a perceived need for secure electronic patient-physician communication systems, security barriers may diminish their overall usefulness. A dual approach is necessary to improve this situation: patients need to be better informed about security issues, and, at the same time, their experiences of using secure systems must be studied and used to improve user interfaces.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Oct 20;282(15):1466-7110535438
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Oct 21;124(20):2633-615534640
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2001 Apr;61(1):71-8011248604
Cites: J Fam Pract. 2001 May;50(5):414-811350705
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2002 Mar-Apr;9(2):181-9111861633
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jun 30;122(17):1640-412555603
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2003 Apr;70(1):1-912706177
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2003 May-Jun;10(3):260-7012626378
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2003 Apr-Jun;5(2):e912857665
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):362-414963512
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2003 Oct 1;3:1114519206
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2004 May;73(4):333-4015135751
Cites: BMJ. 2004 May 15;328(7449):115915142919
Cites: J Med Pract Manage. 2004 Mar-Apr;19(5):247-5115152908
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Oct 21;280(15):1321-49794310
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Oct 21;280(15):1353-99794317
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2004 Nov-Dec;11(6):505-1315299001
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2001 Apr;61(1):1-1011248599
PubMed ID
15998606 View in PubMed
Less detail

104 records – page 1 of 11.