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Building a pan-Canadian primary care sentinel surveillance network: initial development and moving forward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149799
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;22(4):412-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Richard Birtwhistle
Karim Keshavjee
Anita Lambert-Lanning
Marshall Godwin
Michelle Greiver
Donna Manca
Claudia Lagacé
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario Canada K7L 5N6. birtwhis@queensu.ca
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;22(4):412-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Databases as Topic
Family Practice
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Population Surveillance - methods
Primary Health Care
Program Development
Abstract
The development of a pan-Canadian network of primary care research networks for studying issues in primary care has been the vision of Canadian primary care researchers for many years. With the opportunity for funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada and the support of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, we have planned and developed a project to assess the feasibility of a network of networks of family medicine practices that exclusively use electronic medical records. The Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network will collect longitudinal data from practices across Canada to assess the primary care epidemiology and management of 5 chronic diseases: hypertension, diabetes, depression, chronic obstructive lung disease, and osteoarthritis. This article reports on the 7-month first phase of the feasibility project of 7 regional networks in Canada to develop a business plan, including governance, mission, and vision; develop memorandum of agreements with the regional networks and their respective universities; develop and obtain approval of research ethics board applications; develop methods for data extraction, a Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network database, and initial assessment of the types of data that can be extracted; and recruitment of 10 practices at each network that use electronic medical records. The project will continue in phase 2 of the feasibility testing until April 2010.
PubMed ID
19587256 View in PubMed
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Choosing networks for picture archiving and communication systems and teleradiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68870
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2003;9 Suppl 1:S27-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
I H Monrad Aas
Jonn Terje Geitung
Author Affiliation
The Work Research Institute, Oslo, Norway. mon-a@online.no
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2003;9 Suppl 1:S27-9
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Decision Making
Hospital Shared Services - organization & administration
Humans
Norway
Radiology Information Systems - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Teleradiology - organization & administration
Abstract
Qualitative interviews were performed with 26 resource persons with experience of picture archiving and communication systems and teleradiology. The results reported here concern the different types of networks there was interest in establishing. Eight types of networks were considered to be of interest. The two main reasons for wanting the networks were related to clinical communication and improved exploitation of resources. Use of such networks means cooperation across organizational boundaries. Networks can play an organizational role and this raises questions concerning the future organization of radiology services.
PubMed ID
12952712 View in PubMed
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Computer communication for international collaboration in education in public health. The TEMPUS Consortium for a New Public Health in Hungary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69007
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1992 Dec 17;670:43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-17-1992
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1992 Dec 17;670:43-9
Date
Dec-17-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Canada
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Epidemiology - education
Faculty, Medical
Hungary
International Cooperation
Israel
Norway
Organizational Objectives
Public Health - education
Research
Statistics - education
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Computer conferencing using the Canadian system CoSy is presented, and three related projects are discussed. 1. An extramural university course in epidemiology and medical statistics was taught using CoSy. Computer conferencing can be a useful vehicle for distance education, enabling health professionals to attend "classes" independent of geographical and time constraints. The subjects taught are well suited to this medium. 2. Internet was used to establish a small network of public health researchers and teachers. Participants are from Canada, Hungary, Israel, Norway, and Australia. Networks of this type not only facilitate international collaboration within public health, they also enable international collaborative research and teaching projects that would have been too cumbersome and time consuming to initiate and conduct without this communication facility. 3. "Development of Medical Education for a New Public Health in Hungary," a project funded by the European Community's TEMPUS program, is established with a view to developing the undergraduate and graduate education of public health professionals. It is a joint program between the five Hungarian medical schools and ten universities in the G24 countries. The TEMPUS listserver functions as an important vehicle for communication within this project.
PubMed ID
1309104 View in PubMed
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Computerized integration of pharmacy and laboratory data: a prototype model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220114
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1993 Oct;46(5):212-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993

Development of functional requirements for electronic health communication: preliminary results from the ELIN project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172213
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2005;13(3):203-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Tom Christensen
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Medisinsk Teknisk Forskningssenter (MTFS), Trondheim, Norway. tom.christensen@utnu.no
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2005;13(3):203-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Family Practice
Humans
Medical Informatics Computing
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Norway
Office Automation
Software Design
Abstract
User participation is important for developing a functional requirements specification for electronic communication. General practitioners and practising specialists, however, often work in small practices without the resources to develop and present their requirements. It was necessary to find a method that could engage practising doctors in order to promote their needs related to electronic communication.
Qualitative research methods were used, starting a process to develop and study documents and collect data from meetings in project groups. Triangulation was used, in that the participants were organised into a panel of experts, a user group, a supplier group and an editorial committee.
The panel of experts created a list of functional requirements for electronic communication in health care, consisting of 197 requirements, in addition to 67 requirements selected from an existing Norwegian standard for electronic patient records (EPRs). Elimination of paper copies sent in parallel with electronic messages, optimal workflow, a common electronic 'envelope' with directory services for units and end-users, and defined requirements for content with the possibility of decision support were the most important requirements.
The results indicate that we have found a method of developing functional requirements which provides valid results both for practising doctors and for suppliers of EPR systems.
PubMed ID
16259860 View in PubMed
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Does improved access to diagnostic imaging results reduce hospital length of stay? A retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141019
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:262
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Petter Hurlen
Truls Østbye
Arne S Borthne
Pål Gulbrandsen
Author Affiliation
Helse Sør-Øst Health Services Research Centre Akershus University Hospital, NO-1478 Lørenskog, Norway. petter@hurlen.no
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:262
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Databases, Factual
Diagnostic Imaging - utilization
Electronic Health Records
Female
Hospital Information Systems - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Radiology Information Systems - organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - utilization
Abstract
One year after the introduction of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to support diagnostic imaging at our hospital, clinicians had faster and better access to radiology reports and images; direct access to Computed Tomography (CT) reports in the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) was particularly popular. The objective of this study was to determine whether improvements in radiology reporting and clinical access to diagnostic imaging information one year after the ICT introduction were associated with a reduction in the length of patients' hospital stays (LOS).
Data describing hospital stays and diagnostic imaging were collected retrospectively from the EMR during periods of equal duration before and one year after the introduction of ICT. The post-ICT period was chosen because of the documented improvement in clinical access to radiology results during that period. The data set was randomly split into an exploratory part used to establish the hypotheses, and a confirmatory part. The data was used to compare the pre-ICT and post-ICT status, but also to compare differences between groups.
There was no general reduction in LOS one year after ICT introduction. However, there was a 25% reduction for one group - patients with CT scans. This group was heterogeneous, covering 445 different primary discharge diagnoses. Analyses of subgroups were performed to reduce the impact of this divergence.
Our results did not indicate that improved access to radiology results reduced the patients' LOS. There was, however, a significant reduction in LOS for patients undergoing CT scans. Given the clinicians' interest in CT reports and the results of the subgroup analyses, it is likely that improved access to CT reports contributed to this reduction.
Notes
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Cites: Australas Radiol. 2005 Aug;49(4):278-8216026433
PubMed ID
20819224 View in PubMed
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The effects of a regional telepathology project: a study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126150
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Marie-Claude Trudel
Guy Paré
Bernard Têtu
Claude Sicotte
Author Affiliation
HEC Montréal, 3000, Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montréal, Canada, H3T 2A7. marie-claude.trudel@hec.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration - trends
Frozen Sections
Hospital Shared Services - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Medically underserved area
Organizational Case Studies
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Telepathology - organization & administration - trends
Abstract
Telepathology, which is an emerging form of telemedicine in Canada, is defined as the electronic transmission of pathological images, usually derived from microscopes, from one location to another. There are various applications of telepathology, including case referral for an expert opinion, provision of an emergency service in the absence of a resident pathologist, and education. Until now, there has been relatively little use of telepathology for core diagnostic services in the absence of a local pathologist, but this practice is likely to increase in the future. The Laval University Integrated Health Network is in the process of deploying a telepathology system, primarily to provide an intraoperative frozen section service to small hospitals in sparsely populated areas which are experiencing a severe shortage of on-site pathologists. The telepathology project involves 17 hospitals located in five regions of eastern Quebec, Canada. This paper describes the study protocol that will be used to evaluate the benefits associated with the project.
A panel of experts was first assembled by Canada Health Infoway to agree on a set of benefits indicators that could be applied to all telepathology projects across Canada. Using the set of indicators as an input, we have developed a three-step study protocol. First, a survey questionnaire will be distributed to appraise the way pathologists, pathology technologists and surgeons perceive the telepathology system and its impacts. Second, a series of semi-structured interviews will be conducted with project leaders and telepathology users at sites that are representative of all the hospitals in the Laval University Integrated Health Network. The overall aim is to better understand the expected and unexpected effects of telepathology on health care professionals and patients as well as on the regional organization and delivery of care services. Finally, a pre-post design using secondary data is proposed to evaluate a wide array of tangible benefits to the patients, the health care providers, the hospitals, and the region as a whole.
The Laval University Integrated Health Network's telepathology project is expected to yield positive and significant results that are relevant internationally. Our findings will provide valuable information on the nature and extent of benefits associated with telepathology systems intended to provide an intraoperative frozen section service to remote hospitals experiencing a shortage of specialists.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22420301 View in PubMed
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Information technologies for clinical toxicology in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213242
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1996;34(6):665-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N N Litvinov
Y N Ostapenko
V I Kazachkov
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Information and Advisory Center, Russian Federation Ministry of Health, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1996;34(6):665-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Humans
Poison Control Centers - organization & administration
Russia
Toxicology - methods
Abstract
To describe Poison Information in Russia.
The Moscow Toxicology Information and Advisory Center was created in 1993 as an institution of the Russian Federation Ministry of Health and Medical Industry. The Toxicology Information and Advisory Center is the first in a network of over 20 toxicology information centers to be created in different regions of Russia by 1998. At present the Toxicology Information and Advisory Center serves over 20 million people in the Moscow region with episodic inquiries from other areas. A prototype national bank of clinical and toxicological data on acute chemical poisoning and an information retrieval system POISON have been created. Work is underway to create computerized systems for data analysis of telephone inquiries on diagnosis and treatment protocols of acute poisoning.
PubMed ID
8941194 View in PubMed
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Integrated care needs integrated information management and technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146172
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:24-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Denis Protti
Author Affiliation
School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:24-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management
Clinical Protocols
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Health Care Reform
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Information Management - organization & administration
Information Storage and Retrieval - methods
Information Systems - organization & administration
Medical Record Linkage - methods
Systems Integration
United States
Abstract
Integrated care entails that professionals from different organizations have to work together in a team-oriented way to provide high-quality care for a patient. This requires that healthcare professionals share information about--and with--patients at appropriate points in the care or treatment process. The necessary infrastructural arrangements--such as shared patient records, regional collaboration and a clear, transparent incentive structure--must be in place. It is increasingly hard to imagine integrative initiatives without a strong information management and technology component. However, information is a necessary condition but not sufficient to achieve integrated care; organizational change is the more critical component.
PubMed ID
20057245 View in PubMed
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Integrating heterogeneous healthcare call centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203283
Source
Healthc Inf Manage. 1998;12(2):29-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K M Peschel
W C Reed
K. Salter
Author Affiliation
Olsten Health Services, Natick, MA, USA.
Source
Healthc Inf Manage. 1998;12(2):29-40
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Consumer Satisfaction
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Information Centers - organization & administration
Multi-Institutional Systems - organization & administration
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Innovation
Systems Integration
Telecommunications - organization & administration
Telephone
Triage - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
In a relatively short period, OHS has absorbed multiple call centers supporting different LOBs from various acquisitions, functioning with diverse standards, processes, and technologies. However, customer and employee satisfaction is predicated on OHS's ability to thoroughly integrate these heterogeneous call centers. The integration was initiated and has successfully progressed through a balanced program of focused leadership and a defined strategy which includes site consolidation, sound performance management philosophies, and enabling technology. Benefits have already been achieved with even more substantive ones to occur as the integration continues to evolve.
PubMed ID
10182516 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.