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A 5-year follow-up of older adults residing in long-term care facilities: utilisation of a comprehensive dental programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149106
Source
Gerodontology. 2009 Dec;26(4):282-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Chris C L Wyatt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. cwyatt@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Gerodontology. 2009 Dec;26(4):282-90
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Comprehensive Dental Care - organization & administration - utilization
Dental Care for Aged - organization & administration - utilization
Dental Caries - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Periodontal Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study will compare the clinical outcomes of 139 elders residing in long-term care (LTC) who received dental treatment with those who did not receive care under a comprehensive dental programme over 5 years.
Numerous studies have documented very poor oral health and limited access to dental care among frail older adults residing in LTC facilities. The University of British Columbia and Providence Healthcare developed a comprehensive dental programme to serve elderly LTC residents within seven Vancouver hospitals. Since 2002, the Geriatric Dentistry Programme has provided annual oral health assessments and access to comprehensive dental care.
A comprehensive oral health assessment was provided using CODE (an index of Clinical Oral Disorders in Elders). A change in oral health status (improvement or worsening) was evaluated by measuring CODE scores including caries and periodontal condition, and other aspects of the dentition.
Eighty-three residents received dental treatment of some form over the 5 years, while 56 did not receive any treatment beyond an annual examination. The percentage of residents initially recommended for treatment in 2002 was 97%, which declined to 70-73% after the 3rd year. The percentage of residents treated increased after the first year and remained at 56-72% thereafter. The comparison between CODE scores from baseline and 5 years later showed an improvement for those receiving care (p = 0.02, chi(2) = 7.9, df = 2).
Within the limitations of this study, residents who did consent and receive care showed an improvement in their oral health status after 5 years.
PubMed ID
19682096 View in PubMed
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The 2010 American college of rheumatology fibromyalgia survey diagnostic criteria and symptom severity scale is a valid and reliable tool in a French speaking fibromyalgia cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120514
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mary-Ann Fitzcharles
Peter A Ste-Marie
Pantelis Panopalis
Henri Ménard
Yoram Shir
Fred Wolfe
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. mary-ann.fitzcharles@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comprehension
Disability Evaluation
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a pain condition with associated symptoms contributing to distress. The Fibromyalgia Survey Diagnostic Criteria and Severity Scale (FSDC) is a patient-administered questionnaire assessing diagnosis and symptom severity. Locations of body pain measured by the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), and the Symptom Severity scale (SS) measuring fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, cognitive and somatic complaints provide a score (0-31), measuring a composite of polysymptomatic distress. The reliability and validity of the translated French version of the FSDC was evaluated.
The French FSDC was administered twice to 73 FM patients, and was correlated with measures of symptom status including: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for global severity and pain. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity were evaluated.
Test-retest reliability was between .600 and .888 for the 25 single items of the FSDC, and .912 for the total FSDC, with all correlations significant (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22994975 View in PubMed
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Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257231
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Townsend
Susan M Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada. atownsen@exchange.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Biomedical research
British Columbia
Communication
Comprehension
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Therapeutic Misconception
Abstract
Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies.
This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7.
A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment.
Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or treatment. Those with low health status may be more vulnerable to potential coercion, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach to obtaining consent. Our findings also indicate the need for boundary work in order to better differentiate treatment and research. It is important however to acknowledge a categorical ambiguity; it is not always the case that people are misinformed about the possible benefits of research procedures (i.e., therapeutic misconception); our participants were aware that the primary purpose of research is to gain new knowledge yet they also identified a range of actual health benefits arising from their participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24119203 View in PubMed
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Addressing the struggle to link form and understanding in fractions instruction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116717
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2013 Mar;83(Pt 1):29-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Helena P Osana
Nicole Pitsolantis
Author Affiliation
Concordia University, Québec, Canada. osana@education.concordia.ca
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2013 Mar;83(Pt 1):29-56
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child
Comprehension
Concept Formation
Female
Humans
Learning
Male
Mathematics - education
Students
Abstract
Although making explicit links between procedures and concepts during instruction in mathematics is important, it is still unclear the precise moments during instruction when such links are best made.
The objective was to test the effectiveness of a 3-week classroom intervention on the fractions knowledge of grade 5/6 students. The instruction was based on a theory that specifies three sites during the learning process where concepts and symbols can be connected (Hiebert, 1984): symbol interpretation, procedural execution, and solution evaluation. Sample. Seventy students from one grade 5/6 split and two grade 6 classrooms in two public elementary schools participated.
The students were randomly assigned to treatment and control. The treatment (Sites group) received instruction that incorporated specific connections between fractions concepts and procedures at each of the three sites specified by the Sites theory. Before and after the intervention, the students' knowledge of concepts and procedures was assessed, and a random subsample of 30 students from both conditions were individually interviewed to measure their ability to make specific connections between concepts and symbols at each of the three sites.
While all students gained procedural skill (p
PubMed ID
23369174 View in PubMed
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Administrative outcomes five years after opening an acute palliative care unit at a comprehensive cancer center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145151
Source
J Palliat Med. 2010 May;13(5):559-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
John Bryson
Gary Coe
Nadia Swami
Patricia Murphy-Kane
Dori Seccareccia
Lisa W Le
Gary Rodin
Camilla Zimmermann
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Med. 2010 May;13(5):559-65
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cancer Care Facilities - organization & administration
Comprehensive Health Care - utilization
Female
Health Services Administration
Hospital Administration
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - rehabilitation
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
We examined administrative outcomes after opening an oncology acute palliative care unit (APCU), to determine attainment of administrative targets related to the unit's function of acute palliation.
We retrospectively reviewed the administrative database for our APCU for the 5 years following its opening in 2003. Data were abstracted on demographic information, as well as source of admission, primary reason for admission, discharge destination, inpatient death rate, and length of stay. Linear regression and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were used for analysis. In keeping with targets set at the unit's opening, our primary hypotheses were that outpatient admissions, admissions for symptom control, and discharges home would increase over the study period; secondary hypotheses were that length of stay and inpatient death rate would decrease.
There were 1748 admissions during the study period: the median age was 64, 54% were women, and the most common cancer sites were gastrointestinal (24%), lung (20%), and gynecologic (13%). There were significant changes for all primary endpoints: outpatient admissions increased from 47% to 70% (p
PubMed ID
20192842 View in PubMed
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Admissions to a radiation oncology inpatient service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208233
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Jun;1(2):116-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
C R Hayter
W J Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Radiation Oncology Research Unit, Queen's University, Kingston General Hospital, Ont. chayter@octrf.on.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Jun;1(2):116-21
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bed Occupancy - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Comprehensive Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Databases as Topic
Endocrine System Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Hospital Information Systems
Hospital Units - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Male
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Radiation Oncology - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Urogenital Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Abstract
Although the care of inpatients is an important aspect of radiation oncology practice in many countries, it has never been studied in detail. The goal of this study was to describe the admissions to a radiation oncology inpatient service over a 1-year period with respect to patient characteristics, primary malignancies, common nonmalignant diagnoses, use of radiotherapy and outcome of admission.
Using computerized hospital databases, we analysed the utilization of 11 radiation oncology beds in a 424-bed teaching hospital from March 31, 1991, to April 1, 1992.
There were 342 admissions of 277 patients. The median age was 66.5 years; the male:female ratio was 1:1. The commonest primary neoplastic diagnoses were lung (42%), gynecological (15%), genitourinary (14%) and breast (8%) cancers. Only 17% of the patients had cancer as the sole diagnosis; most patients had multiple medical diagnoses. Infections (22%), neurological (20%), cardiovascular (13%) and endocrine (9%) conditions were the commonest. Mean length of stay was 11.25 days. Most of the admissions (71%) resulted in discharge to the patient's home; few patients (15%) died. Only half of admissions involved radiotherapy, indicating that the focus of patient care was the medical treatment of cancer complications or other active medical problems.
These data show that radiation oncology inpatients have complicated medical problems, and they support the training of radiation oncologists in the comprehensive medical care of patients.
PubMed ID
9765733 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with chronic disease. Are they receiving comprehensive health care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241399
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1983 Dec;4(4):261-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
G. Carroll
E. Massarelli
A. Opzoomer
G. Pekeles
M. Pedneault
J Y Frappier
N. Onetto
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1983 Dec;4(4):261-5
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Medicine
Canada
Chronic Disease - therapy
Comprehensive Health Care
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
A survey of adolescents with a chronic disease attending six specialty clinics was conducted to determine the sources of their primary health care and to estimate the extent of unmet health needs. Sixty-one patients completed a self-administered questionnaire. Forty percent had no source of primary care other than the subspecialty clinic treating their chronic condition. Seventy-eight percent regarded the subspecialist as their "personal" physician, although only 27% actually spoke to this physician about their general health needs. For 44% general health needs were not being met. These findings suggest that these adolescents expect the subspecialty clinic to provide primary care; yet they receive, at best, fragmented health care. This situation could be improved by a decision on the part of the subspecialty to restrict its role to providing only specific specialty care or to coordinate overall care.
PubMed ID
6643204 View in PubMed
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The adult sense of coherence scale is applicable to 12-year-old schoolchildren--an additional tool in health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168060
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2006 Aug;95(8):952-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Päivi-Leena Honkinen
Sakari Suominen
Päivi Rautava
Jari Hakanen
Raija Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, University of Turku, Unit of Family Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. paivi-leena.honkinen@utu.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2006 Aug;95(8):952-5
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Comprehension
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Psychological Tests
Reproducibility of Results
Self Concept
Set (Psychology)
Abstract
Two principal operations of sense of coherence (SOC) for the study of adults have been developed, one consisting of 29 and another consisting of 13 items. According to these studies, SOC is associated with various aspects of perceived health. Also, a 16-item scale for determining SOC in young children (
PubMed ID
16882568 View in PubMed
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410 records – page 1 of 41.