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2078 records – page 1 of 208.

A 10-year follow up of reproductive function in women treated for childhood cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113054
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
S N Nielsen
A N Andersen
K T Schmidt
C. Rechnitzer
K. Schmiegelow
J G Bentzen
E C Larsen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, The Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - blood - chemically induced - etiology - pathology
Adult
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Live Birth
Menstruation Disturbances - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Ovary - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Pregnancy
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Remission Induction
Risk
Survivors
Young Adult
Abstract
Previously, this study group found that female childhood cancer survivors could be at risk of early cessation of fertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate reproductive function in the same group of survivors 10 years after the initial study. Of the original cohort of 100, 71 were re-examined. Thirty-six survivors reported regular menstrual cycles. When they were compared with 210 controls, they differed significantly in antral follicle count (AFC) (median 15 versus 18, P=0.047) but not in anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (median 13.0 versus 17.8 pmol/l). Survivors cured with minimal gonadotoxic treatment had significantly higher AMH and AFC compared with survivors cured with either potentially gonadotoxic treatment or treatment including alkylating chemotherapy and ovarian irradiation (20.0, 5.8 and
PubMed ID
23768622 View in PubMed
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[10-years caries incidence and intensity dynamics in pregnant women of Derbent city].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120380
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 2012;91(4):60-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
B R Bakhmudov
Z B Alieva
M B Bakhmudov
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 2012;91(4):60-2
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Dagestan - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Caries incidence was assessed in pregnant women in 1998, 2003 an 2008 showing the values to be stable. DMF was almost the same in 1998 and 2003, but in 2008 the rate of "F" (filled) element was significantly higher thus confirming growth in motivation for dental treatment after introduction of private dental practices.
PubMed ID
23011338 View in PubMed
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A 12-year cohort study on adverse pregnancy outcomes in Eastern Townships of Canada: impact of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256963
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Clinical Research Centre of Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre , Sherbrooke, Quebec , Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Peritoneal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide a temporal-spatial reference of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and examine whether endometriosis promotes APO in the same population. Among the 31?068 women who had a pregnancy between 1997 and 2008 in Eastern Townships of Canada, 6749 (21.7%) had APO. These APO increased significantly with maternal age and over time (r(2?)=?0.522, p?=?0.008); and were dominated by preterm birth (9.3%), pregnancy-induced hypertension (8.3%) including gestational hypertension (6.5%), low birth weight (6.3%), gestational diabetes (3.4%), pregnancy loss (2.2%) including spontaneous abortion (1.5%) and stillbirth (0.6%), intrauterine growth restriction (2.1%) and preeclampsia (1.8%). Among the 31?068 pregnancies, 784 (2.5%) had endometriosis and 183 (23.3%) had both endometriosis and APO. Endometriosis has been shown to increase the incidence of fetal loss (OR?=?2.03; 95% CI?=?1.42-2.90, p?
PubMed ID
24134807 View in PubMed
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The 16-year incidence, progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy in a young population-based Danish cohort with type 1 diabetes mellitus: The Danish cohort of pediatric diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259744
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2014;51(3):413-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rebecca Broe
Malin Lundberg Rasmussen
Ulrik Frydkjaer-Olsen
Birthe Susanne Olsen
Henrik Bindesboel Mortensen
Tunde Peto
Jakob Grauslund
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2014;51(3):413-20
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - metabolism
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Male
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the long-term incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and associated risk factors in young Danish patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In 1987-89, a pediatric cohort involving approximately 75 % of all children with Type 1 diabetes in Denmark
PubMed ID
24193810 View in PubMed
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The 24-hour urine collection: gold standard or historical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155561
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Côté
Tabassum Firoz
André Mattman
Elaine M Lam
Peter von Dadelszen
Laura A Magee
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - urine
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Female
Gynecology - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - urine
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - standards
Reference Standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Urinalysis - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine completeness of 24-hour urine collection in pregnancy.
This was a retrospective laboratory/chart review of 24-hour urine collections at British Columbia Women's Hospital. Completeness was assessed by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion (UcreatV): expected according to maternal weight for single collections and between-measurement difference for serial collections.
For 198 randomly selected pregnant women with a hypertensive disorder (63% preeclampsia), 24-hour urine collections were frequently inaccurate (13-54%) on the basis of UcreatV of 97-220 micromol/kg per day (11.0-25.0 mg/kg per day) or 133-177 micromol/kg per day (15.1-20.1 mg/kg per day) of prepregnancy weight (respectively). Lean body weight resulted in more inaccurate collections (24-68%). The current weight was frequently unavailable (28%) and thus not used. For 161 women (81% proteinuric) with serial 24-hour urine levels, a median [interquartile range] of 11 [5-31] days apart, between-measurement difference in UcreatV was 14.4% [6.0-24.9]; 40 women (24.8%) had values 25% or greater, exceeding analytic and biologic variation.
Twenty-four hour urine collection is frequently inaccurate and not a precise measure of proteinuria or creatinine clearance.
PubMed ID
18718568 View in PubMed
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25 years or more after spinal cord injury: clinical conditions of individuals in the Florence and Stockholm areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129470
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
L. Werhagen
S. Aito
L. Tucci
J. Strayer
C. Hultling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet Danderyds Sjukhus, Department of clinical sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.werhagen @ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Retrospective analysis and retrospective follow-up.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have today a nearly normal lifespan. Avoidance of medical complications is key to this end. The aim of the study was to analyse health in individuals surviving 25 years or more after traumatic SCI in Stockholm and Florence, and compare medical complications.
Data from the databases of the Spinal Unit of Florence and from the Spinalis, Stockholm were analysed. Patients included were C2-L 2, American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A-C, and =25 years post traumatic SCI. Patients underwent a thorough neurological and general examination, and were interviewed about medical events during those years. Analysed data include: gender, age at injury, current age, neurological level, AIS, cause of injury, presence of neuropathic pain (NP), and spasticity and medical complications.
A total of 66 Italian patients and 74 Swedish patients were included. The only statistical difference between the groups was cause of injury due to falls was higher in the Florence group (P
PubMed ID
22105457 View in PubMed
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Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-convergence on axonal guidance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260948
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sanne S Kaalund
Morten T Venø
Mads Bak
Rikke S Møller
Henning Laursen
Flemming Madsen
Helle Broholm
Bjørn Quistorff
Peter Uldall
Niels Tommerup
Sakari Kauppinen
Anne Sabers
Kees Fluiter
Lisbeth B Møller
Anne Y Nossent
Asli Silahtaroglu
Jørgen Kjems
Eleonora Aronica
Zeynep Tümer
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Embryo, Mammalian
Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe - complications - metabolism - pathology
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation - physiology
Glutamate Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Hippocampus - metabolism
Humans
Male
MicroRNAs - metabolism
Middle Aged
Nerve Tissue Proteins - metabolism
Netherlands
Pyramidal Cells - metabolism - pathology
Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate - metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
Sclerosis - etiology - pathology
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Swine
Young Adult
Abstract
Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be dysregulated in epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases, and we hypothesized that miRNAs could be involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
miRNA expression was quantified in hippocampal specimens from human patients using miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR, and by RNA-seq on fetal brain specimens from domestic pigs. In situ hybridization was used to show the spatial distribution of miRNAs in the human hippocampus. The potential effect of miRNAs on targets genes was investigated using the dual luciferase reporter gene assay.
miRNA expression profiling showed that 25 miRNAs were up-regulated and 5 were down-regulated in hippocampus biopsies of MTLE/HS patients compared to controls. We showed that miR-204 and miR-218 were significantly down-regulated in MTLE and HS, and both were expressed in neurons in all subfields of normal hippocampus. Moreover, miR-204 and miR-218 showed strong changes in expression during fetal development of the hippocampus in pigs, and we identified four target genes, involved in axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity, ROBO1, GRM1, SLC1A2, and GNAI2, as bona fide targets of miR-218. GRM1 was also shown to be a direct target of miR-204.
miR-204 and miR-218 are developmentally regulated in the hippocampus and may contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
PubMed ID
25410734 View in PubMed
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Abnormal electroencephalograms in patients with long QT syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106966
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2013 Dec;10(12):1877-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Kristina H Haugaa
Tommy Tveit Vestervik
Stein Andersson
Jan Peder Amlie
Ellen Jørum
Leif Gjerstad
Erik Taubøll
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: kristina.haugaa@rr-research.no.
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2013 Dec;10(12):1877-83
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - physiopathology
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Long QT Syndrome - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited cardiac channelopathy associated with syncope and sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. It is most frequently caused by potassium channel mutations. Potassium channels are also expressed in brain tissue and play an important role in idiopathic epilepsies. Recent reports have indicated that related potassium channel mutations may coexpress as concomitant epilepsy and LQTS.
The purpose of this study was to explore cerebral activity by means of EEG recordings in individuals with LQTS related to potassium channel mutations.
Seventeen individuals with confirmed LQTS related to potassium channel mutations (11 LQT1 and 6 LQT2) were prospectively studied with 21-channel electroencephalography (EEG) LQTS -related symptoms, comorbidity, medication, and QTc (12-lead ECG) were recorded. Sixteen healthy individuals previously studied with EEG served as a control group. All EEGs were reviewed by two independent neurophysiologists.
EEG recordings were abnormal in 12 of 17 patients (71%) in the LQTS group, whereas abnormalities were present in only 2 of 16 healthy controls (13%; P
Notes
Comment In: Heart Rhythm. 2013 Dec;10(12):1884-524121000
PubMed ID
24080067 View in PubMed
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Abnormal optic disc and retinal vessels in children with surgically treated hydrocephalus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90653
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2009 Apr;93(4):526-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Andersson S.
Hellström A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, 416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. susann.andersson@oft.gu.se
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2009 Apr;93(4):526-30
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fundus Oculi
Gestational Age
Humans
Hydrocephalus - complications - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ophthalmoscopy
Optic Atrophy - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Prospective Studies
Retinal Vessels - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the morphology of the optic disc and retinal vessels in children with surgically treated hydrocephalus. METHODS: A prospective, population-based study was performed in 69 children (median age 9.6 years) with early surgically treated hydrocephalus. All children were examined by ophthalmoscopy. Additionally, optic disc and retinal vessel morphology was evaluated in 55 children by digital image analysis of ocular fundus photographs. RESULTS: Optic atrophy was found in 10 of 69 children (14%). In comparison with a reference group, the median optic-disc area was significantly smaller (p = 0.013) in the children with hydrocephalus. There was no corresponding difference in cup area, so the rim area was significantly smaller in the hydrocephalic children (p = 0.002). Children with hydrocephalus had an abnormal retinal vascular pattern, with significantly straighter retinal arteries and fewer central vessel branching points compared with controls (p
PubMed ID
19106149 View in PubMed
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ABO Blood Group and Risk of Thromboembolic and Arterial Disease: A Study of 1.5 Million Blood Donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275912
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2016
Author
Senthil K Vasan
Klaus Rostgaard
Ammar Majeed
Henrik Ullum
Kjell-Einar Titlestad
Ole B V Pedersen
Christian Erikstrup
Kaspar Rene Nielsen
Mads Melbye
Olof Nyrén
Henrik Hjalgrim
Gustaf Edgren
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Date
Apr-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - analysis - genetics
Adult
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - epidemiology - genetics
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - genetics
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Thrombophilia - genetics
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
ABO blood groups have been shown to be associated with increased risks of venous thromboembolic and arterial disease. However, the reported magnitude of this association is inconsistent and is based on evidence from small-scale studies.
We used the SCANDAT2 (Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions) database of blood donors linked with other nationwide health data registers to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and the incidence of first and recurrent venous thromboembolic and arterial events. Blood donors in Denmark and Sweden between 1987 and 2012 were followed up for diagnosis of thromboembolism and arterial events. Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios as measures of relative risk. A total of 9170 venous and 24 653 arterial events occurred in 1 112 072 individuals during 13.6 million person-years of follow-up. Compared with blood group O, non-O blood groups were associated with higher incidence of both venous and arterial thromboembolic events. The highest rate ratios were observed for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism (incidence rate ratio, 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.77-2.79), deep vein thrombosis (incidence rate ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.05), and pulmonary embolism (incidence rate ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.88).
In this healthy population of blood donors, non-O blood groups explain >30% of venous thromboembolic events. Although ABO blood groups may potentially be used with available prediction systems for identifying at-risk individuals, its clinical utility requires further comparison with other risk markers.
PubMed ID
26939588 View in PubMed
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2078 records – page 1 of 208.