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[Frequency of sublingual nitroglycerin prescription in patients with coronary artery disease and angina and awareness of patients about the shelf life of the drug].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131272
Source
Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars. 2011 Sep;39(6):469-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Omer Caglar Yilmaz
Gökhan Keskin
Bilal Cuglan
Yusuf Selçoki
Ayla Temizkan
Beyhan Eryonucu
Ozlem Soran
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Medicine Faculty of Fatih University, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars. 2011 Sep;39(6):469-73
Date
Sep-2011
Language
Turkish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Sublingual
Angina Pectoris - complications - drug therapy
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - complications - drug therapy
Drug Storage
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence
Nitroglycerin - administration & dosage - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns
Time Factors
Vasodilator Agents - administration & dosage - standards
Abstract
ACC/AHA/ESC guidelines recommend sublingual nitroglycerin (SNG) in patients with stable angina pectoris and coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the shelf life of SNG following first use is six months for SNG tablets and two years for SNG sprays. We investigated the frequency of prescription of SNG tablets/sprays in patients having anginal symptoms and documented CAD and the awareness levels of patients about appropriate use of SNG.
Three hundred patients (201 men, 99 women; mean age 61.7±10.8 years) with documented CAD and angina were enrolled into this study. Angina pectoris was categorized according to the functional classification system of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Data on cardiovascular past histories, risk factors, medications, and the use of SNG were recorded.
At least one risk factor was present in 96% of the patients. Only 46% of the patients had a prescription for SNG. Of those with a prescription of SNG tablet and spray, 91.8% and 84.4% did not know the shelf life of the product, respectively. Of those who were routinely carrying SNG, 35.6% had an expired product. Of those with a prescription of SNG, only 65.9% were informed by the physician on the proper use of SNG.
Our results show that, despite recommendations of the guidelines, SNG is not prescribed to a substantial percentage of patients with CAD and angina, a considerable fraction of patients carry an expired product, and that patients are not adequately informed by the physicians on the use of SNG. These problems will certainly affect the optimal medical management of CAD and its efficacy.
PubMed ID
21918316 View in PubMed
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[Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia: a case report]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15029
Source
Tuberk Toraks. 2005;53(2):167-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Gönül Tanir
I Etem Piskin
Cumhur Aydemir
Basak Adakli
Serap Ozmen
Zafer Arslan
Ugur Ozçelik
Cigdem Uner
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Tuberk Toraks. 2005;53(2):167-71
Date
2005
Language
Turkish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage
Asthma - etiology
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Pulmonary Eosinophilia - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - pathology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (ICEP) is a rare cause of chronic lung disease in children and adolescents. We described four-years old boy presenting with recurrent pneumonia and symptoms of bronchial asthma. Because of peripheral eosinophilia and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates patient investigated comprehensive and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia determined histopathologically. Other conditions causing eosinophilic pneumonia were ruled out. He showed a dramatic response to oral corticosteroid therapy. This report emphasizes that ICEP should be considered in pediatric age group on a cause for chronic hypoxemi or intractable symptoms of respiratory system.
PubMed ID
16100654 View in PubMed
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[Investigation of herpes simplex virus DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the clinical samples].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177885
Source
Mikrobiyol Bul. 2004 Jul;38(3):233-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Seyyal Rota
Gülendam Bozdayi
Bora Dogan
Bedia Dinç
Author Affiliation
Gazi Universitesi Tip Fakültesi, Tibbi Mikrobiyoloji Anabilim Dali, Ankara.
Source
Mikrobiyol Bul. 2004 Jul;38(3):233-8
Date
Jul-2004
Language
Turkish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniotic Fluid - virology
Cervix Uteri - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis - blood - cerebrospinal fluid
Female
Herpes Genitalis - diagnosis
Herpes Simplex - diagnosis
Herpesvirus 1, Human - genetics - isolation & purification
Herpesvirus 2, Human - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Pericardial Effusion - virology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - diagnosis
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2 DNA from the clinical samples sent to our routine laboratory, by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 328 samples collected from 306 female and 7 male patients who were admitted to different outpatient clinics were included in the study. The samples included 235 cervical swab samples (of which 150 were from pregnant women), 77 amniotic fluid, 8 blood, 6 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), one pericardial fluid and one cervical biopsy. DNA extraction were performed with High Pure Viral Nucleic Acid Kit (Roche, Germany) and amplified in Light Cycler (Roche, Germany) with a commercial amplification mix (Metis Biotechnology, Ankara). HSV-DNA positivity were found in 2.1% of the cervical samples (three of 150 pregnant and two of 85 non-pregnant women), two of the blood samples and one of the CSF sample, while there were no positive result for the other clinical specimens. It can be concluded that, real-time PCR would be preferred in conditions requiring rapid diagnosis such as HSV infections of central nervous system and HSV suspected infections of immunosupressed patients, as a rapid and practical method.
PubMed ID
15490842 View in PubMed
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[The importance of human parvovirus infections in pediatrics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60105
Source
Mikrobiyol Bul. 1987 Oct;21(4):308-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1987
Author
A M Tuncer
Author Affiliation
Ankara Dr. Sami Ulus Cocuk Hastanesi Basasistani.
Source
Mikrobiyol Bul. 1987 Oct;21(4):308-10
Date
Oct-1987
Language
Turkish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital - etiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hydrops Fetalis - etiology
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Parvoviridae - immunology
Parvoviridae Infections - complications
Pregnancy
Abstract
Human Parvovirus (HPV) is a DNA virus which causes the aplastic rises in the chronic hemolytic anemias. HPV IgG was found positive in the newborns with CMV and Rubella negative congenital intrauterine infection. Recently, it was reported that nonimmunologic hydrops fetalis caused by HPV Now, HPV (especially B 19) is a well known virus which takes significant place in the public health and pediatrics.
PubMed ID
2846990 View in PubMed
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