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497 records – page 1 of 50.

[123 cases of adverse effects of alternative medicine. Several severe injuries after a stay at a health resort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38179
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Mar 8;86(10):882-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1989

Accountability of anthropologists, indigenous healers and their governments: a plea for reasonable medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233938
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(12):1461-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Adverse drug events in cognitively impaired elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164367
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;23(6):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Hooman Ganjavi
Nathan Herrmann
Paula A Rochon
Papita Sharma
Monica Lee
Daniel Cassel
Morris Freedman
Sandra E Black
Krista L Lanctôt
Author Affiliation
Neuropharmacology Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;23(6):395-400
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - complications
Complementary Therapies - adverse effects
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Risk factors
Self Administration - adverse effects
Self Medication - adverse effects
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a frequent problem encountered in the elderly. The aim of this study was to elucidate the factors that influence ADEs in an elderly population with cognitive impairment.
242 patients were recruited from dementia clinics and assessed after 6 months for ADEs. The use of natural health products (NHPs) was also documented.
Backward logistic regression found that higher age (OR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.12), and greater cognitive impairment (OR = 0.94; 95% CI 0.90-0.98) were associated with an increased risk of developing an ADE while the use of NHPs (OR = 0.32; 95% CI 0.13-0.79) was associated with a decreased risk (chi(2) = 27.6, p
PubMed ID
17396031 View in PubMed
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Age-related patterns in mental health-related complementary and alternative medicine utilization in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141498
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Apr;23(3):459-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Rebecca Crabb
John Hunsley
Author Affiliation
Special Fellowship Program in Advanced Geriatrics, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Palo Alto, CA 94304–1290, USA. rebecca.crabb@va.gov
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Apr;23(3):459-71
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether age-related differences in rates of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) specifically for mental health problems parallel well-known age-related differences in use of conventional mental health services and medications.
A sample of middle-aged (45-64 years; n = 10,762), younger-old (65-74; n = 4,113) and older-old adults (75 years and older; n = 3,623) was drawn from the 2001-2002 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), Cycle 1.2, Mental Health and Wellbeing. Age-related utilization rates of conventional and complementary mental health services and medications/products were calculated. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the strength of association between age group and utilization of services and medications or products in the context of other important sociodemographic and clinical characteristics.
When considered in the context of other sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, older age was positively associated with mental health-related utilization of alternative health products. Older age was not significantly associated with mental health-related consultations with CAM providers.
Overall, age-related patterns in mental health-related use of CAM did not directly correspond to age-related patterns in conventional mental health care utilization, suggesting different sets of predictors involved in seeking each type of care.
Notes
Erratum In: Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Apr;23(3):472
PubMed ID
20716388 View in PubMed
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Age, sex, disease, ethnicity et al - are complementary therapies reaching the parts?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128514
Source
Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2012 Feb;18(1):2-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012

AIDS and alternative medicine: a journalist's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211671
Source
AIDS Treat News. 1996 Jun 21;(no 249):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1996
Author
J S James
Source
AIDS Treat News. 1996 Jun 21;(no 249):6-8
Date
Jun-21-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - therapy
Communication
Complementary Therapies
Humans
Research
PubMed ID
11363598 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and smoking behavior in chronic pain patients: the role of opioids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92152
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Jul;13(6):606-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Ekholm Ola
Grønbaek Morten
Peuckmann Vera
Sjøgren Per
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Jul;13(6):606-12
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Analgesics, Opioid - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Complementary Therapies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - complications - drug therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Tooth
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary aim of this epidemiological study was to investigate associations between chronic non-cancer pain with or without opioid treatment and the alcohol and smoking behavior. The secondary aims were to investigate self-reported quality of life, sleeping problems, oral health and the use of different health care providers. The Danish health survey of 2005 was based on a region-stratified random sample of 10.916 individuals. Data were collected via personal interviews and self-administrated questionnaires. Respondents suffering from chronic pain were identified through the question 'Do you have chronic/long-lasting pain lasting 6 months or more?' The question concerning alcohol intake assessed the frequency of alcohol intake and binge drinking. Smoking behavior assessed the daily number of cigarettes. Individuals reporting chronic pain were stratified into two groups (opioid users and non-opioid users). In all, 7275 individuals completed a personal interview and 5552 individuals completed and returned the self-administrated questionnaire. Responders with a self-reported earlier or present cancer diagnosis were excluded from the study. Hence, the final study population consisted of 5292 individuals. We found, that individuals suffering from chronic pain were less likely to drink alcohol. In opioid users alcohol consumption was further reduced. Cigarette smoking was significantly increased in individuals suffering from chronic pain and in opioid users smoking was further increased. Poor oral health, quality of life and sleep were markedly associated with chronic pain and opioid use. The use of opioids was associated with significantly more contacts to healthcare care providers.
PubMed ID
18774317 View in PubMed
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Alternative and complementary medicine in Canadian medical schools: a survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202524
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):816-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1999
Author
J. Ruedy
D M Kaufman
H. MacLeod
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. John.Ruedy@Dal.Ca
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):816-7
Date
Mar-23-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Complementary Therapies - education
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Humans
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Notes
Cites: Prim Care. 1993 Sep;20(3):509-228378448
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1990 Jul;80(7):814-82356904
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Sep 2;280(9):784-79729989
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1997 Jan;90(1):19-229059376
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Jul 27;161(2):128-910439818
PubMed ID
10189426 View in PubMed
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Alternative and complementary therapy use in pediatric oncology patients in British Columbia: prevalence and reasons for use and nonuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205941
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1998 Apr;16(4):1279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
C V Fernandez
C A Stutzer
L. MacWilliam
C. Fryer
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, and University of British Columbia School of Nursing, British Columbia's Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1998 Apr;16(4):1279-86
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Income
Male
Neoplasms - therapy
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Alternative and complementary therapies are infrequently studied in pediatric populations. We performed a population-based survey to aid health care workers in identifying and counseling parents who may use these remedies.
We retrospectively surveyed the parents of 583 pediatric patients diagnosed with cancer in British Columbia between 1989 and 1995. Prevalence and factors that influence the use and nonuse of alternative and complementary therapies were estimated.
Alternative and complementary therapies were used by 42% of 366 respondents. Herbal teas, plant extracts, and therapeutic vitamins were the most commonly used alternative therapies. Relaxation/imagery strategies, massage, and therapeutic touch were the most commonly used complementary techniques. Factors that influenced the use of alternative/complementary therapies were prior use (chi2 = 60.0, P
PubMed ID
9552026 View in PubMed
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497 records – page 1 of 50.