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170 records – page 1 of 17.

[A comparative evaluation of the indirect hemagglutination, indirect hemolysis and complement fixation tests in a study of various questions in the epidemiology of northern Asia tick-borne rickettsiosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110434
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1968 Nov;45(11):112-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1968

Age-specific prevalence of complement-fixing antibodies to sixteen viral antigens: a computer analysis of 58,500 patients covering a period of eight years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241269
Source
J Med Virol. 1984;13(2):131-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
P. Ukkonen
T. Hovi
C H von Bonsdorff
P. Saikku
K. Penttinen
Source
J Med Virol. 1984;13(2):131-48
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviruses, Human - immunology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Complement Fixation Tests
Computers
Coronaviridae - immunology
Disease Outbreaks
Enterovirus - immunology
Finland
Herpesviridae - immunology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Orthomyxoviridae - immunology
Paramyxoviridae - immunology
Rotavirus - immunology
Virus Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
The age-specific prevalence of CF antibodies against 16 viral antigens was determined by using the computerized data registry of the routine diagnostic laboratory of the authors' department. The material consisted of data based on serum specimens from about 58,500 patients. All ages from newborn infants to 90-year-olds were represented. The sera had been collected and tested with a CF screening test over a period of 8 years (1971-1978). Several different antibody prevalence patterns were distinguished in regard to the rapidity and timing of the initial increase of the prevalence, as well as to the mode of later changes in prevalence. For most respiratory viruses a rapid increase of the prevalence was seen through the childhood continuing, for some of them, up to the 30s (influenza A and coronavirus), while rather variable patterns were found in the older age groups. Herpes simplex and cytomegaloviruses showed, interestingly, another type of pattern: a slow increase of prevalence continuing through the whole age range. The frequency of herpes simplex antibodies reached 90% by the age of 80 years. Antibody levels against any antigen in infants less than one-month-old were equal to those in 20- to 40-year-old adults, and the expected rapid decrease of antibodies took place within the first 6 months of life. Possible influences of epidemics and repeated exposures to different viruses (external boosting), and of latent or chronic infections (internal boosting), as well as of technical variations, on the observed prevalence patterns are discussed.
PubMed ID
6319588 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of influenza B in the province of Quebec in the Spring of 1966: laboratory studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111385
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Feb 25;96(8):457-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-1967
Author
M O Pokoski
A. Boudreault
V. Pavilanis
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Feb 25;96(8):457-61
Date
Feb-25-1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complement Fixation Tests
Disease Outbreaks
Hemagglutination inhibition tests
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology
Orthomyxoviridae - isolation & purification
Quebec
Seasons
Abstract
Laboratory studies of an influenza B epidemic in the Province of Quebec carried out during the spring of 1966 are described. During that period six influenza B strains were isolated. The isolated strains did not differ markedly from previous influenza B strains. The serological studies showed that this epidemic had spread over different parts of the Province of Quebec.The serological studies also showed that an isolated community, such as an armed forces camp, can exhibit an epidemiological pattern different from that obtaining in the whole population.
Notes
Cites: J Hyg Epidemiol Microbiol Immunol. 1963;7:151-6513981354
Cites: Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1955 Aug;89(4):654-913254857
Cites: Am J Hyg. 1964 Jan;79:107-1214114349
PubMed ID
6019961 View in PubMed
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170 records – page 1 of 17.