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The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
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A 4-fold risk of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49604
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Kaisa M Saari
Sari M Lindeman
Kaisa M Viilo
Matti K Isohanni
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Liisa H Laurén
Markku J Savolainen
Hannu J Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. kaisa.saari@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diet Therapy
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with a shortened life expectancy and increased somatic comorbidity with, e.g., cardiovascular disorders. One major risk factor for these disorders is the metabolic syndrome, which has been reported to have a higher frequency in schizophrenic patients. Our objective was to study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a population-based birth cohort. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 5613 members of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort who participated in the field study from 1997 to 1998. Subjects were divided into 4 diagnostic categories (DSM-III-R): (1) schizophrenia (N = 31), (2) other functional psychoses (N = 22), (3) nonpsychotic disorders (N = 105), and (4) no psychiatric hospital treatment (N = 5455, comparison group). Subjects were assessed for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program. RESULTS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in subjects with schizophrenia compared with the comparison group (19% vs. 6%, p = .010). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with other psychoses was 5%. After controlling for sex, the results of logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.5 to 9.0). CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia even at such a relatively young age underscores the need to select antipsychotic medications with no or little capability to induce metabolic side effects. Also, developing comprehensive efforts directed at controlling weight and diet and improving physical activity are needed.
PubMed ID
15889940 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of adolescents who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107628
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sheilagh Hodgins
Sara Lövenhag
Mattias Rehn
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Maria-Ungdom Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that substance misuse in adolescence is associated with increased risks of hospitalizations for mental and physical disorders, convictions for crimes, poverty, and premature death from age 21 to 50. The present study examined 180 adolescent boys and girls who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden. The adolescents and their parents were assessed independently when the adolescents first contacted the clinic to diagnose mental disorders and collect information on maltreatment and antisocial behavior. Official criminal files were obtained. Five years later, 147 of the ex-clients again completed similar assessments. The objectives were (1) to document the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and drug use disorders (DUD) in early adulthood; and (2) to identify family and individual factors measured in adolescence that predicted these disorders, after taking account of AUD and DUD in adolescence and treatment. Results showed that AUD, DUD, and AUD + DUD present in mid-adolescence were in most cases also present in early adulthood. Prediction models detected no positive effect of treatment in limiting persistence of these disorders. Thus, treatment-as-usual provided by the only psychiatric service for adolescents with substance misuse in a large urban center in Sweden failed to prevent the persistence of substance misuse. Despite extensive clinical assessments of the ex-clients and their parents, few factors assessed in mid-adolescence were associated with substance misuse disorders 5 years later. It may be that family and individual factors in early life promote the mental disorders that precede adolescent substance misuse.
PubMed ID
23989597 View in PubMed
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A 5-year prospective study of predictors for disability pension among patients with major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129883
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
I A K Holma
K M Holma
T K Melartin
H J Rytsälä
E T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Mood, Depression, and Suicidal Behaviour Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
There is a scarcity of prospective long-term studies on work disability caused by depression. We investigated predictors for disability pension among psychiatric patients with MDD.
The Vantaa Depression Study followed up prospectively 269 psychiatric in- and out-patients with DSM-IV MDD for 5 years with a life chart, including 230 (91.3%) patients belonging to labour force. Information on disability pensions was obtained from interviews, patient records and registers.
Within 5 years, 20% of the patients belonging to labour force at baseline were granted a disability pension. In multivariate analyses, the significant baseline predictors for granted disability pension were age =50 years (HR = 3.91, P
PubMed ID
22054701 View in PubMed
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A 10 mg warfarin initiation nomogram is safe and effective in outpatients starting oral anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153058
Source
Thromb Res. 2009 Jul;124(3):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Katherine Monkman
Alejandro Lazo-Langner
Michael J Kovacs
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Thromb Res. 2009 Jul;124(3):275-80
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - methods
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Comorbidity
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hemorrhage - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Venous Thromboembolism - drug therapy - mortality
Warfarin - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
The optimal means of initiating warfarin therapy for acute venous thromboembolism in the outpatient setting remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of a 10 mg initiation nomogram in a randomized controlled trial; however, some clinicians remain reluctant to use this nomogram due to a fear of potential increased bleeding. To review the safety and efficacy of a 10 mg warfarin nomogram we conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients prospectively treated for venous thromboembolism according to a 10 mg nomogram in an outpatient thrombosis clinic. All patients received standard treatment with low molecular weight heparin for 5 to 7 days and warfarin for at least 3 months. Four-hundred and fourteen patients were included in the analysis, of whom 295 (71%) fully adhered to the nomogram. In the whole cohort, 8 patients (1.9%) experienced recurrent thrombosis, 4 (0.97%) suffered a major bleeding event, and 3 (0.72%) suffered a minor bleeding event. There were no deaths related to thrombosis or bleeding. Four patients (0.97%) died from unrelated causes. Twenty-two (5.3%) patients experienced an INR > or =5.0 in the first 8 days of therapy, and none of these patients experienced a bleeding event. Eighty-four percent of patients achieved a therapeutic INR by day 5. In outpatients, a 10 mg nomogram results in timely achievement of a therapeutic INR with an acceptable incidence of bleeding and recurrent thromboembolism.
PubMed ID
19155056 View in PubMed
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12-month prevalence of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in the Swedish general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71618
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Per Carlbring
Henrik Gustafsson
Lisa Ekselius
Gerhard Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Box 1225, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):207-11
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the prevalence of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia according to DSM-IV criteria in the Swedish general population. METHOD: Data were obtained by means of a postal survey administrated to 1000 randomly selected adults. The panic disorder module of the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was included in the survey. RESULTS: 12-month prevalence was estimated at 2.2 % (CI 95 % 1.02 % - 3.38 %). There was a significant sex difference, with a greater prevalence for women (5.6 %) compared to men (1 %). CONCLUSION: The Swedish panic disorder prevalence is relatively consistent with findings in most other parts of the western world.
PubMed ID
12107711 View in PubMed
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14-Year Survey in a Swedish County Reveals a Pronounced Increase in Bloodstream Infections (BSI). Comorbidity - An Independent Risk Factor for Both BSI and Mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283680
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166527
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Martin Holmbom
Christian G Giske
Mats Fredrikson
Åse Östholm Balkhed
Carina Claesson
Lennart E Nilsson
Mikael Hoffmann
Håkan Hanberger
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166527
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Candidiasis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Community-Acquired Infections
Comorbidity
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Fungemia - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
we assessed the incidence, risk factors and outcome of BSI over a 14-year period (2000-2013) in a Swedish county.
retrospective cohort study on culture confirmed BSI among patients in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, with approximately 440,000 inhabitants. A BSI was defined as either community-onset BSI (CO-BSI) or hospital-acquired BSI (HA-BSI).
of a total of 11,480 BSIs, 67% were CO-BSI and 33% HA-BSI. The incidence of BSI increased by 64% from 945 to 1,546 per 100,000 hospital admissions per year during the study period. The most prominent increase, 83% was observed within the CO-BSI cohort whilst HA-BSI increased by 32%. Prescriptions of antibiotics in outpatient care decreased with 24% from 422 to 322 prescriptions dispensed/1,000 inhabitants/year, whereas antibiotics prescribed in hospital increased by 67% (from 424 to 709 DDD per 1,000 days of care). The overall 30-day mortality for HA-BSIs was 17.2%, compared to 10.6% for CO-BSIs, with an average yearly increase per 100,000 hospital admissions of 2 and 5% respectively. The proportion of patients with one or more comorbidities, increased from 20.8 to 55.3%. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for mortality within 30 days were: HA-BSI (2.22); two or more comorbidities (1.89); single comorbidity (1.56); CO-BSI (1.21); male (1.05); and high age (1.04).
this survey revealed an alarming increase in the incidence of BSI over the 14-year study period. Interventions to decrease BSI in general should be considered together with robust antibiotic stewardship programmes to avoid both over- and underuse of antibiotics.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27835663 View in PubMed
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A 20-year ecological study of the temporal association between influenza and meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30400
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Elise Snitker Jensen
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Susanne Samuelsson
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark. esjensen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Meningococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Periodicity
Poisson Distribution
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Both influenza and meningococcal disease (MD) show seasonal variation with peak incidence rates during the winter. We examined whether fluctuations in occurrence of influenza were associated with changes in the incidence rate of MD, either simultaneously or with a delay of one or 2 weeks, and whether age had an impact on these associations. This ecological study was based on weekly surveillance data on influenza and a complete registration of MD cases (n = 413) in North Jutland County, Denmark, during 1980-1999. A total of 379 MD cases occurred during weeks with influenza registration. The analysis was done using a Poisson regression model taking into account the seasonal variation and trend over time in incidence rate of MD, and stratified by age: or = 14 years (n = 152). An increase of 100 registered cases of influenza per 100,000 inhabitants was associated with a 7% (95% CI: -1 to 15%) increase in the number of MD cases during the same week. The association was most marked for
PubMed ID
15074574 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
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4539 records – page 1 of 454.