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4574 records – page 1 of 458.

Comorbid Alcohol/Other Drug Abuse and Psychiatric Disorders in Adult American Indian and Alaska Natives: A Critique

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297010
Source
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly Vol 26, 2008 Issue 3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Patrick J. Abbott
Source
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly Vol 26, 2008 Issue 3
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbid
Substance abuse
Alaska Native
Alcohol
Abstract
The American Indian and Alaska Native population is a heterogeneous population with significant social, psychological, and alcohol/other drug use risk factors. This article reviews the adult research to date that has examined the overlap between alcohol/other drug abuse and mental disorders. In the adult community and treatment seeking clinical populations, the co-occurrence of alcohol/other drug abuse and mental disorders is particularly high. Some studies among Native American populations have shown higher rates of affective disorders, post-traumatic stress disorders, organic brain disorders, and lower rates of drug abuse/dependence.
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Addressing physical health problems experienced by people with schizophrenia in Canada: a critical literature review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139231
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Sep;42(3):124-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Debora Isane R Kirschbaum Nitkin
Denise Gastaldo
Author Affiliation
Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Sep;42(3):124-40
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Comorbidity
Humans
Schizophrenia - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
The authors present a critical review of the literature produced by Canadian researchers regarding medical co-morbidities and the resources and strategies they recommend for assessing and managing the physical health problems of people with schizophrenia. Scientific production in the field consists of 9 original research articles and 6 literature reviews, revealing a dearth of studies in this area in Canada. The studies examined show that diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and substance abuse are the most frequent co-morbidities affecting people with schizophrenia. Another finding is that most researchers are challenged methodologically to generalize results due to limitations in design or sample characteristics. The authors point to the need for more research to better understand the role of treatment, individual characteristics, lifestyle, and structural issues in the development of co-morbidities among people with schizophrenia. They also discuss the importance of addressing these topics in nursing practice and education.
PubMed ID
21086781 View in PubMed
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Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2010;(2):79-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
L A Luchikhin
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2010;(2):79-82
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Humans
Otolaryngology
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
PubMed ID
20527094 View in PubMed
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[Comorbidity in migraine: the literature review and approaches to study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155776
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2007;107(3):64-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
V V Osipova
T G Voznesenskaia
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2007;107(3):64-73
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity - trends
Humans
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Morbidity - trends
Russia - epidemiology
PubMed ID
18688933 View in PubMed
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Editorial comment: Prognostic information in administrative co-morbidity data following coronary artery bypass grafting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144046
Source
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2010 Nov;38(5):577-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Alexander Wahba
Source
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2010 Nov;38(5):577-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Prognosis
Notes
Comment On: Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2010 Nov;38(5):573-620413318
PubMed ID
20413319 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking and asthma: a dangerous mix.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175616
Source
Can Respir J. 2005 Mar;12(2):79-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Catherine Lemiere
L-P Boulet
Author Affiliation
Sacre-Coeur Hospital, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Can Respir J. 2005 Mar;12(2):79-80
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Humans
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
In Canada, 20% to 30% of the general population currently smoke. Smoking is as common in those suffering from asthma as it is in the general population. However, most studies on the pathophysiology of asthma and its response to treatment only include nonsmokers. Available data that examine the influence of smoking on clinical, functional and inflammatory characteristics of asthma, as well as the influence of smoking on the therapeutic response to corticosteroids, were reviewed. Active smoking is associated with an increased morbidity from asthma and impairs the response to inhaled corticosteroids. These observations emphasize the need for smoking cessation in patients with asthma and for reassessment of current treatment guidelines in this population.
PubMed ID
15785796 View in PubMed
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Co-occurrence of eating disorders and alcohol use disorders in women: a meta analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163305
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2007;10(4):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
T. Gadalla
N. Piran
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. tahany.gadalla@utoronto.ca
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2007;10(4):133-40
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Abstract
This meta analysis involved 41 studies published between January of 1985 and May of 2006, which examined the co-occurrence of eating disorders (ED) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) in women. Studies were reviewed and a quantitative synthesis of their results was carried out via the calculation of standardised effect sizes. Direction and strength of the relationships between AUD and specific disordered eating patterns were examined. Heterogeneity of reported results was also assessed and examined. Only 4 out of 41 studies reported negative associations between ED and AUD. The magnitude of the associations between eating-disordered patterns and AUD ranged from small to medium size and were statistically significant for any ED, bulimia nervosa (BN)/bulimic behavior, purging, binge eating disorder (BED) and eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). No association was found between anorexia nervosa (AN) and AUD. The magnitude of the association between BN and AUD was the most divergent across studies and those between each of BED and dietary restriction and AUD were the most consistent across studies. Reported associations of different patterns of disordered eating and AUD were generally weakest and most divergent when participants were recruited from clinical settings and strongest and most homogeneous when participants were recruited from student populations.
PubMed ID
17533558 View in PubMed
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Cardiomyopathy in Danish patients with coeliac disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54168
Source
Lancet. 1999 Oct 30;354(9189):1561
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1999
Author
K. Fonager
H T Sørensen
B. Nørgård
A M Thulstrup
Source
Lancet. 1999 Oct 30;354(9189):1561
Date
Oct-30-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - epidemiology
Celiac Disease - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 1999 Jul 17;354(9174):222-310421311
PubMed ID
10551530 View in PubMed
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Why are there no treatment guidelines for mood disorders and comorbidities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127359
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012

Comorbidity trajectories in working age cancer survivors: A national study of Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287012
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2017 Jun;48:48-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ayako Hiyoshi
Katja Fall
Cecilia Bergh
Scott Montgomery
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2017 Jun;48:48-55
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Survivors - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
A large proportion of cancer survivors are of working age, and maintaining health is of interest both for their working and private life. However, patterns and determinants of comorbidity over time among adult cancer survivors are incompletely described. We aimed to identify distinct comorbidity trajectories and their potential determinants.
In a cohort study of Swedish men born between 1952 and 1956, men diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2003 (n=878) were matched with cancer-free men (n=4340) and followed over five years after their first year of survival. Comorbid diseases were identified using hospital diagnoses and included in the analysis using group-based trajectory modelling. The association of socioeconomic and developmental characteristics were assessed using multinomial logit models.
Four distinct comorbidity trajectories were identified. As many as 84% of cancer survivors remained at very low levels of comorbidity, and the distribution of trajectories was similar among the cancer survivors and the cancer-free men. Increases in comorbidity were seen among those who had comorbid disease at baseline and among those with poor summary disease scores in adolescence. Socioeconomic characteristics and physical, cognitive and psychological function were associated with types of trajectory in unadjusted models but did not retain independent relationships with them after simultaneous adjustment.
Among working-age male cancer survivors, the majority remained free or had very low levels of comorbidity. Those with poorer health in adolescence and pre-existing comorbid diseases at cancer diagnosis may, however, benefit from follow-up to prevent further increases in comorbidity.
PubMed ID
28365446 View in PubMed
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4574 records – page 1 of 458.