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Arctic telemedicine project. Sustainable development working group, Arctic Council

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6406
Source
Pages 461-465 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
  1 document  
Author
Hild, C.M
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage, USA
Source
Pages 461-465 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Community-Institutional Relations
Disaster planning
Guidelines
Health Planning Guidelines
Information Services
Inservice training
Medically underserved area
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Telemedicine - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Four general areas have been identified and must be addressed in concert in order for telemedicine to be a sustainable feature in arctic communities: physical infrastructures, training structures, interoperability guidelines, community interface.
PubMed ID
11768418 View in PubMed
Documents
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Beyond self-assessment--assessing organizational cultural responsiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152943
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(1):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sarah Bowen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. sbowen@wrha.mb.ca
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(1):7-15
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Benchmarking - standards
Community-Institutional Relations
Cultural Competency - education - organization & administration
Documentation - standards
Feedback, Psychological
Focus Groups
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Manitoba
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Organizational Culture
Patient satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prejudice
Questionnaires - standards
Research Design
Abstract
While there is growing recognition of the need for health care organizations to provide culturally responsive care, appropriate strategies for assessing organizational responsiveness have not been determined. A document review assessment instrument was designed to assess best practice within eight domains, and along seven dimensions of organizational approach to diversity. Results obtained from the pilot of the instrument were congruent with data collected from key informant interviews, a focus group, observational methods and organizational feedback session; however, they were not consistent with self-assessment results at the same site. A larger pilot is required to determine generalizability of results.
PubMed ID
19172974 View in PubMed
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Community-hospital partnerships. The Quick Response Team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222819
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1992 Nov;22(11):33-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
J I Dawson
L. Critchley
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, British Columbia.
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1992 Nov;22(11):33-9
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Community-Institutional Relations
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Frail Elderly
Home Care Services - economics - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient care team
Pilot Projects
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The Quick Response Team project was an intervention designed and implemented by the Capital Regional District Care Program in partnership with the Greater Victoria Hospital Society. The aim was to address the health needs of frail elderly with multiple social, emotional, physical, and medical problems who were at risk for a custodial admission to acute care. The result was an innovation in organizational and program development that required human, material, and financial resource management to maintain client safety, well being and satisfaction, avert admissions to acute care, and identify new and relevant directions for community healthcare.
PubMed ID
1432223 View in PubMed
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[Group homes and the "not in my back yard" phenomenon (NIMBY)--it happened close to home: a pilot study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178044
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2004;29(1):151-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Myra Piat
Author Affiliation
Division des soins continus et spécialisés pour adultes, Hôpital Douglas.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2004;29(1):151-72
Date
2004
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Community-Institutional Relations
Deinstitutionalization
Disabled Children - psychology - rehabilitation
Group Homes
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Prisoners - education - psychology
Public Opinion
Quebec
Abstract
Implementation of group homes often come up against the "Not in My Back Yard" (NIMBY) phenomenon. In order to better understand this phenomenon, this pilot study examines the experience of community residents in three borough where opposition to the implementation of group homes was encountered. Results reveal the underlying reasons for this problem as well as explore the negative impact of the presence of such group homes in the community. Finally, the author concludes that listening to citizens and acknowledging their concerns are essential to developing greater acceptance and a better support towards group homes.
PubMed ID
15470571 View in PubMed
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Like parent, like child. A health promoting hospital project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192241
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2001 Dec 15;45(4):261-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2001
Author
T. Mavor
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion, Grand River Hospital, P.O. Box 9056, Kitchener, Ont., Canada N2G 1G3. ted_mavor@grhosp.on.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2001 Dec 15;45(4):261-4
Date
Dec-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Child Welfare
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Community Health Planning
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Hospitals, Municipal - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Parents - education - psychology
Pilot Projects
Prenatal care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
One way to reduce the need and demand for hospital services is via health promotion initiatives. A prenatal instructors' education module preventing the learning of violence as acceptable behaviour by children in their first year of life was developed by a health promoting hospital in partnership with its community. Children learn through observing significant adults in their life. Parents are important influences on the children's behaviour, and good (or bad) patterns are passed on from generation to generation. Some abuse occurs because people (primarily males) lack the skills to resolve conflict and stress in a positive way and resort to abuse. The project's intent is to help expectant parents reduce abusive behaviours. This parental modelling awareness program has the potential to be introduced into different high risk groups, day-care centres and multicultural settings.
PubMed ID
11755770 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of antenatal depression in women enrolled in an outreach program in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168065
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Jul-Aug;35(4):491-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Angela Bowen
Nazeem Muhajarine
Author Affiliation
Community Health & Epidemiology in the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. angela.bowen@usask.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Jul-Aug;35(4):491-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Institutional Relations
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prenatal Care
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of depression and its correlates in pregnancy and to establish the appropriateness of using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale with inner-city, high-risk pregnant women.
Convenience sample of women enrolled in a prenatal outreach program. Women were recruited and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was administered during home visits.
39 women, most of whom were Aboriginal, participating in a prenatal outreach program.
Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score of >or=10 suggests minor depressive symptoms and >or=13 suggests probable major depression.
27% of women reported symptoms consistent with major depression. The Aboriginal women had higher levels of depressive symptoms than the non-Aboriginal women. Women who had stopped using tobacco or alcohol during pregnancy had more depressive symptoms than those who had quit before pregnancy. Acceptability of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale for use with high-risk, Aboriginal, and non-Aboriginal pregnant women was supported.
The prevalence of depressive symptoms and concurrent substance use within this population is a major public health problem. Nurses can incorporate the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale into routine prenatal visits to identify women at risk for depression.
PubMed ID
16881993 View in PubMed
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Structuring a clinical learning environment for a hybrid-PBL dental curriculum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204162
Source
J Dent Educ. 1998 Sep;62(9):723-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998

Using network analysis to map the formal clinical reporting process in pediatric palliative care: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128698
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:343
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Harold Siden
Karen Urbanoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Child & Family Research Institute, 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver BC, V6H 3N1, Canada. hsiden@cw.bc.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:343
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community-Institutional Relations
Continuity of Patient Care
Hospice Care
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Palliative Care
Pediatrics
Pilot Projects
Risk Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Continuity of care is a key component of care in complex and chronic conditions. Despite its importance, it is often absent in chronic-disease management. One challenge has been identifying tools to measure care continuity. In one context important to families, namely pediatric palliative care, we undertook a project to identify continuity and to pilot the use of network analysis as a tool.
Network analysis studies patterns of relationships or interactions between members, providing qualitative and quantitative description of network structure.
In this report we applied network analysis to paper records of clinical consultations and reports for 6 patients with complex conditions. A high degree of discontinuity was identified, and care was fragmented amongst specialist and generalist providers. Information was shared selectively and often moved in only one direction.
Families have anecdotally reported frustration with poor continuity of care. Network analysis can be a useful tool in describing the discontinuity of care experienced by families dealing with complex and chronic conditions. This tool could be expanded to other systems such as electronic health records and many other health care situations.
Notes
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Cites: Can Oncol Nurs J. 2004 Summer;14(3):183-6, 188-9115379377
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2004 Sep-Oct;2(5):445-5115506579
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Cites: Med Care. 1981 Jul;19(7):741-586455572
Cites: Med Care. 1982 Apr;20(4):347-606210811
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2009 Apr;44(2 Pt 2):717-3821456113
Cites: Can Oncol Nurs J. 2004 Fall;14(4):224-3215635896
Cites: Can Oncol Nurs J. 2005 Winter;15(1):4-1415779778
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;3(5):443-816189061
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2007 Apr;15(2):99-10617441818
Cites: Science. 2009 Feb 13;323(5916):892-519213908
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Cites: J Fam Pract. 2004 Dec;53(12):974-8015581440
PubMed ID
22176787 View in PubMed
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We're hired by the hospital, but we work for the community: examining hospital involvement in community action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193662
Source
Hosp Q. 2001;4(3):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B. Poland
S. Tobin
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. blake.poland@utoronto.ca
Source
Hosp Q. 2001;4(3):52-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Hospital Administration
Humans
Leadership
Personnel, Hospital
Pilot Projects
Notes
Comment In: Hosp Q. 2001 Spring;4(3):6011508174
PubMed ID
11508172 View in PubMed
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