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The bookworm club: the implementation story of an evidence-informed literacy program for children residing in out-of-home care in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117691
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(5):137-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013

Bridging the gap in population health for rural and Aboriginal communities: a needs assessment of public health training for rural primary care physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164068
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2007;12(2):81-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jane A Buxton
Veronic Ouellette
Alison Brazier
Carl Whiteside
Rick Mathias
Meena Dawar
Andrea Mulkins
Author Affiliation
The Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2007;12(2):81-8
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Clinical Competence
Communication
Community Medicine
Community-Institutional Relations
Cultural Characteristics
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Physicians, Family - economics - education
Population Groups
Public Health - education
Rural Health Services
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The literature identifies significant inequalities in the health status of rural and Aboriginal populations, compared with the general population. Providing rural primary care physicians with public health skills could help address this issue since the patterns of mortality and morbidity suggest that prevention and health promotion play an important role. However, we were unable to identify any community needs assessment for such professionals with dual skills that had been performed in Canada.
We conducted key informant interviews and focus groups in 3 rural and Aboriginal communities in British Columbia (chosen through purposive sampling). We analyzed transcripts following standard qualitative iterative methodologies to extract themes and for discussing content.
There was broad support for a program to train primary care physicians in public health. The characteristics identified as necessary in such a physician included a long-term commitment to the community with partnership building, advocacy, communication and cultural sensitivity skills. The communities we studied identified some priority challenges, most notably that the current remuneration structure does not support physicians engaging in public health or research.
There is great potential and support for the training of rural primary care practitioners in public health to improve population health and engage communities in this process.
PubMed ID
17442135 View in PubMed
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Community-academic research on hard-to-reach populations: benefits and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176882
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Feb;15(2):263-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Cecilia Benoit
Mikael Jansson
Alison Millar
Rachel Phillips
Author Affiliation
University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Feb;15(2):263-82
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavioral Research - methods
Canada
Communication
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Organizations, Nonprofit - organization & administration
Prostitution - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Alienation - psychology
Stereotyping
Universities - organization & administration
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
In this article, the authors examine some of the benefits and challenges associated with conducting research on hard-to-reach/hidden populations: in this instance, sex workers. The population studied was female and male sex workers working in different sectors of the sex industry in a medium-size Canadian metropolitan area. The authors describe the need for close community-academic cooperation, given the hidden and highly stigmatized nature of the target population that was investigated and the local context in which the research project was embedded. The authors discuss the main benefits and challenges of the research collaboration for the various parties involved, including the community partner organization, indigenous research assistants, and academic research team. They conclude with a discussion of strategies to help overcome the main challenges faced during the research endeavor.
PubMed ID
15611208 View in PubMed
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A community-based hip-hop dance program for youth in a disadvantaged community in Ottawa: implementation findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143270
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2010 May;11(3 Suppl):61S-9S
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Julie Beaulac
Marcela Olavarria
Elizabeth Kristjansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba and Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Canada. jbeaulac@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2010 May;11(3 Suppl):61S-9S
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
Dancing
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Motor Activity
Ontario
Poverty
School Health Services
Abstract
Participation in physical activity is important for the positive development and well-being of youth. A community- academic partnership was formed to improve access to physical activity for youth in one disadvantaged community in Ottawa, Canada. After consulting this community, a new hip-hop dance intervention was implemented. Adolescents aged 11 to 16 years participated in one of two 3-month sessions. A girls-only and a boys-and-girls format were offered both sessions. This article investigates the implementation of the intervention from the perspective of the youth participants, parents, staff, and researchers. Multiple methods were used, including document review, observation, questionnaire, focus groups, and interviews. Overall, the consistency and quality of program implementation were moderately satisfactory; however, important concerns were noted and this program appeared to be only partially delivered as planned. These findings will be discussed in terms of suggestions for improving the implementation of this intervention and similar recreation programs prioritizing disadvantaged communities.
PubMed ID
20488970 View in PubMed
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Community pharmacist outreach program directed at physicians treating congestive heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198767
Source
Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2000 Apr 15;57(8):747-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2000
Author
C J Turner
P. Parfrey
K. Ryan
R. Miller
A. Brown
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80262, USA. christopher.turner@uchsc.edu
Source
Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2000 Apr 15;57(8):747-52
Date
Apr-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Community Pharmacy Services - standards
Community-Institutional Relations - standards
Digoxin - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Therapy, Combination
Furosemide - therapeutic use
Heart Failure - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Newfoundland and Labrador
Physician's Practice Patterns
Predictive value of tests
Records as Topic
Abstract
The predictive value of digoxin and furosemide treatment for identifying patients receiving treatment for congestive heart failure (CHF), the use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in this population, and the ability of a pharmacist outreach program to address underutilization of ACE inhibitors were studied. All physicians and owner-managers of community pharmacies on Newfoundland's Avalon Peninsula were asked to participate in the study. Pharmacists who agreed to participate were asked to list patients of the participating physicians with prescriptions for (1) furosemide and digoxin with and without an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II-receptor inhibitor and (2) an ACE inhibitor. Physicians were visited by a pharmacist and asked whether each of their patients receiving digoxin and furosemide was being treated for CHF and to identify further cases of CHF among their patients receiving an ACE inhibitor. Intervention-group physicians received academic detailing on the use and dosage of ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II-receptor inhibitors for CHF. Both groups were reinterviewed after three months to establish what if any changes in therapy had occurred for each patient discussed during the first visit. The positive predictive value of digoxin and furosemide treatment for identifying patients receiving treatment for CHF was 94%. Seventy-six percent of patients identified by physicians as CHF patients who were taking digoxin and furosemide were treated with an ACE inhibitor. Thirty-six percent of patients treated with an ACE inhibitor for CHF received the targeted dosage. Four physicians stated that the outreach visit influenced their prescribing, but there was no significant difference in ACE inhibitor prescribing between the intervention and control groups. A pharmacist outreach program involving the use of prescription records and academic detailing did not affect prescribing or dosages of ACE inhibitors but demonstrated value as a quality assurance tool.
PubMed ID
10786260 View in PubMed
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Conducting HIV/AIDS research with indoor commercial sex workers: reaching a hidden population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165880
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2007;1(2):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Valencia P Remple
Caitlin Johnston
David M Patrick
Mark W Tyndall
Ann M Jolly
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2007;1(2):161-8
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Needs Assessment
Peer Group
Prevalence
Prostitution
Abstract
Although comprising up to 80% of the commercial sex industry in Canada, indoor female sex workers (FSW) are generally not represented in research because they are a hidden population and difficult to access.
This paper describes a community-academic partnership model that was established to gain access to, deliver outreach services to, and conduct community-based research with the indoor commercial sex industry in four cities in British Columbia.
The project employed an ongoing community consultation, peer-delivered approach to reaching this overlooked segment of the commercial sex industry. Peers (former and current FSW) were hired, trained, and supported as outreach workers and participated in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the project. Outreach teams visited sex establishments to deliver harm reduction materials and provide education, support, and referrals. The teams developed rapport with establishment managers and staff to facilitate research recruitment and data collection. The community team leader met with managers in targeted business to describe the study and elicit permission to recruit workers. The team leader conducted in-person interviews with consenting FSW.
During the first 2 years of the project, more than 50 sex establishments were visited by outreach teams and 37 allowed repeat visits. Research interviews have been conducted with 49 FSW in seven establishments from four cities.
Although the high cost in terms of time and resources must be recognized, this project represents a successful research and outreach model that permits access to the hidden commercial sex industry.
Notes
Comment In: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2007 Summer;1(2):117-920208229
PubMed ID
20208235 View in PubMed
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Consultation and remediation in the north: meeting international commitments to safeguard health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107785
Source
Pages 857-863 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):857-863
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Laura Banfield
Cynthia G Jardine
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Source
Pages 857-863 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):857-863
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Community-Institutional Relations
Environmental Remediation - methods
Gold
Humans
International Cooperation
Interviews as Topic
Mining - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Abstract
International commitments exist for the safeguarding of health and the prevention of ill health. One of the earliest commitments is the Declaration of Alma-Ata (1978), which provides 5 principles guiding primary health care: equity, community participation, health promotion, intersectoral collaboration and appropriate technology. These broadly applicable international commitments are premised on the World Health Organization's multifaceted definition of health. The environment is one sector in which these commitments to safeguarding health can be applied. Giant Mine, a contaminated former gold mine in the Northwest Territories, Canada, represents potential threats to all aspects of health. Strategies for managing such threats usually involve an obligation to engage the affected communities through consultation.
To examine the remediation and consultation process associated with Giant Mine within the context of commitments to safeguard health and well-being through adapting and applying the principles of primary health care.
Semi-structured interviews with purposively selected key informants representing government proponents and community members were conducted.
in reviewing themes which emerged from a series of interviews exploring the community consultation process for the remediation of Giant Mine, the principles guiding primary health were mapped to CONSULTATION IN the North: (a) "equity" is the capacity to fairly and meaningfully participate in the consultation; (b) "community participation" is the right to engage in the process through reciprocal dialogue; (c) "health promotion" represents the need for continued information sharing towards awareness; (d) "intersectoral collaboration" signifies the importance of including all stakeholders; and (e) "appropriate technology" is the need to employ the best remediation actions relevant to the site and the community.
Within the context of mining remediation, these principles form an appropriate framework for viewing consultation as a means of meeting international obligations to safeguard health.
PubMed ID
23977646 View in PubMed
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Identifying optimal postmarket surveillance strategies for medical and surgical devices: implications for policy, practice and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117222
Source
BMJ Qual Saf. 2013 Mar;22(3):210-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Anna R Gagliardi
Muriah Umoquit
Pascale Lehoux
Sue Ross
Ariel Ducey
David R Urbach
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada. anna.gagliardi@uhnresearch.ca
Source
BMJ Qual Saf. 2013 Mar;22(3):210-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Consultants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Equipment and Supplies
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Medical Device Legislation
Medical Record Linkage - methods
Needs Assessment
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing - methods
Qualitative Research
Surgical Instruments - economics - standards
United States
Abstract
Non-drug technologies offer many benefits, but have been associated with adverse events, prompting calls for improved postmarket surveillance. There is little empirical research to guide the development of such a system. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal postmarket surveillance strategies for medical and surgical devices.
Qualitative methods were used for sampling, data collection and analysis. Stakeholders from Canada and the USA representing different roles and perspectives were first interviewed to identify examples and characteristics of different surveillance strategies. These stakeholders and others they recommended were then assembled at a 1-day nominal group meeting to discuss and prioritise the components of a postmarket device surveillance system, and research needed to achieve such a system.
Consultations were held with 37 participants, and 47 participants attended the 1-day meeting. They recommended a multicomponent system including reporting by facilities, clinicians and patients, supported with some external surveillance for validation and real-time trials for high-risk devices. Many considerations were identified that constitute desirable characteristics of, and means by which to implement such a system. An overarching network was envisioned to broker linkages, establish a shared minimum dataset, and support communication and decision making. Numerous research questions were identified, which could be pursued in tandem with phased implementation of the system.
These findings provide unique guidance for establishing a device safety network that is based on existing initiatives, and could be expanded and evaluated in a prospective, phased fashion as it was developed.
PubMed ID
23322750 View in PubMed
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Improved preventive care in family practices with outreach facilitation: understanding success and failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187820
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2002 Oct;7(4):195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
William Hogg
Neil Baskerville
Candace Nykiforuk
Dan Mallen
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, 43 Bruyere Street (375 Etage 3JB), Ottawa, Ontario K1N 5C8, Canada.
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2002 Oct;7(4):195-201
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Consultants
Family Practice - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Mentors
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Innovation
Preventive Health Services - standards
Total Quality Management - methods
Abstract
To understand why some family practices with a facilitator improved preventive performance more than others. Sustainability of practice improvements one year after the intervention was also explored.
Interviews with physicians and nurses from seven practices and data gathered during the intervention were used to form case studies of three high performing and four low performing family practices. Case studies were developed using cross-case analysis with a combination of the constant-comparative method and memoing-diagramming. Two researchers independently conducted in-depth coding of transcripts and documents, individual case construction for each study site, and then cross-case analysis of the identified themes between study sites.
Staff involvement and a positive attitude toward implementation of changes were central to high improvement in performance. A lack of computers, low staff involvement or high staff turnover were associated with low improvement in performance. Personal characteristics of the facilitator are important. Six of the seven practices still had the prevention tools in place one year after the intervention and all noted that participation had improved their understanding of preventive medicine.
When using facilitators, one should avoid practices in turmoil, strive for continuity over time, and recognise the importance of the relationship between the facilitator and the practice.
PubMed ID
12425778 View in PubMed
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The Injection Support Team: a peer-driven program to address unsafe injecting in a Canadian setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126048
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):491-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Will Small
Evan Wood
Diane Tobin
Jacob Rikley
Darcy Lapushinsky
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):491-501
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community-Institutional Relations
Drug users
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Observation
Peer Group
Risk Reduction Behavior
Social Support
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Abstract
In 2005, members of the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) formed the Injection Support Team (IST). A community-based research project examined this drug-user-led intervention through observation of team activities, over 30 interviews with team members, and 9 interviews with people reached by the team. The IST is composed of recognized "hit doctors," who perform outreach in the open drug scene to provide safer injecting education and instruction regarding safer assisted-injection. The IST represents a unique drug-user-led response to the gaps in local harm reduction efforts including programmatic barriers to attending the local supervised injection facility.
Notes
Comment In: Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):555-722428823
Comment In: Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):558-6522428824
PubMed ID
22428817 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.