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Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284320
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Geary J1, Jardine CG, Guebert J, Bubela T.
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations/legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Financing, Government
Genetics, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
Genetics, Medical/organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American/ethnology
Indians, North American/genetics
Indians, North American/legislation & jurisprudence
Documents
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An integrative framework for community partnering to translate theory into effective health promotion strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182801
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Nov-Dec;18(2):168-76
Publication Type
Article
Author
Allan Best
Daniel Stokols
Lawrence W Green
Scott Leischow
Bev Holmes
Kaye Buchholz
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Nov-Dec;18(2):168-76
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Comprehensive Health Care - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Health Policy
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Models, organizational
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Systems Theory
Abstract
Although there is general agreement about the complex interplay among individual-, family-, organizational-, and community-level factors as they influence health outcomes, there is still a gap between health promotion research and practice. The authors suggest that a disjuncture exists between the multiple theories and models of health promotion and the practitioner's need for a more unified set of guidelines for comprehensive planning of programs. Therefore, we put forward in this paper an idea toward closing the gap between research and practice, a case for developing an overarching framework--with several health promotion models that could integrate existing theories--and applying it to comprehensive health promotion strategy.
We outline a theoretical foundation for future health promotion research and practice that integrates four models: the social ecology; the Life Course Health Development; the Predisposing, Reinforcing, and Enabling Constructs in Educational/Environmental Diagnosis and Evaluation-Policy, Regulatory and Organizational Constructs in Educational and Environmental Development; and the community partnering models. The first three models are well developed and complementary. There is little consensus on the latter model, community partnering. However, we suggest that such a model is a vital part of an overall framework, and we present an approach to reconciling theoretical tensions among researchers and practitioners involved in community health promotion.
THE NEED FOR SYSTEMS THEORY AND THINKING: Systems theory has been relatively ignored both by the health promotion field and, more generally, by the health services. We make a case for greater use of systems theory in the development of an overall framework, both to improve integration and to incorporate key concepts from the diverse systems literatures of other disciplines.
(1) Researchers and practitioners understand the complex interplay among individual-, family-, organizational-, and community-level factors as they influence population health; (2) health promotion researchers and practitioners collaborate effectively with others in the community to create integrated strategies that work as a system to address a wide array of health-related factors; (3) The Healthy People Objectives for the Nation includes balanced indicators to reflect health promotion realities and research-measures effects on all levels; (4) the gap between community health promotion "best practices" guidelines and the way things work in the everyday world of health promotion practice has been substantially closed.
We suggest critical next steps toward closing the gap between health promotion research and practice: investing in networks that promote, support, and sustain ongoing dialogue and sharing of experience; finding common ground in an approach to community partnering; and gaining consensus on the proposed integrating framework.
PubMed ID
14621414 View in PubMed
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Source
Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):146-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
D S Kim
Author Affiliation
Ethelyn R. Strong School of Social Work, Norfolk State University, VA 23504, USA. dskim@nsu.edu
Source
Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):146-8
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Deinstitutionalization
Group Homes
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):127-3810845147
PubMed ID
10845149 View in PubMed
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Begin with ethics. The rest will follow.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184916
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;2(3):46-53; discussion 111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Keith MacLellan
Author Affiliation
Society of Rural Physicians of Canada, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;2(3):46-53; discussion 111-4
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - ethics - organization & administration
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Community-Institutional Relations
Ethics, Institutional
Humans
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Solutions to some of the challenges facing Academic Health Sciences Centres (AHSC) might be found in expanding their mandate from the traditional tripartite definition - teaching, research and patient care - to include an equally important fourth mandate - responsibility to the community. Indeed, it could be argued that the current movement towards community-based teaching will exert such funding and organizational pressure on AHSCs that fundamental change will be forced upon them.
PubMed ID
12811130 View in PubMed
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Bringing palliative care to a Canadian cancer center: the palliative care program at Princess Margaret Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168643
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Oct;14(10):982-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Camilla Zimmermann
Dori Seccareccia
Allyson Clarke
David Warr
Gary Rodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Ave., 16th Floor, M5G 2M9, Toronto, ON, Canada. camilla.zimmermann@uhn.on.ca
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Oct;14(10):982-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Hospitals
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Neoplasms - nursing - therapy
Oncology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Pain Clinics - organization & administration
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Program Development
Referral and Consultation - organization & administration
Abstract
It is increasingly recognized that complete care of the patient with cancer includes palliative care, which is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with life-prolonging treatment. Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) is Canada's largest center for cancer care and research, and it is an international referral center for patients with cancer. The Palliative Care Program at PMH has developed into a comprehensive clinical, educational, and research program, with an acute palliative care unit, daily palliative care clinics, a cancer pain clinic, and a consultation service that sees urgent consultations on a same-day basis in inpatient and outpatient areas. We will describe the components, successes, and challenges of our program, which may be useful for others, who are developing palliative care programs in an academic setting.
PubMed ID
16802127 View in PubMed
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Building capacity for community-based participatory research for health disparities in Canada: the case of "Partnerships in Community Health Research".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139495
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2011 Mar;12(2):280-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Jeffrey R Masuda
Genevieve Creighton
Sean Nixon
James Frankish
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Geography, Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. jeff.masuda@cnehse.ca
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2011 Mar;12(2):280-92
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Canada
Capacity Building - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Professional Competence
Program Development
Universities - organization & administration
Abstract
Enthusiasm for community-based participatory research (CBPR) is increasing among health researchers and practitioners in addressing health disparities. Although there are many benefits of CBPR, such as its ability to democratize knowledge and link research to community action and social change, there are also perils that researchers can encounter that can threaten the integrity of the research and undermine relationships. Despite the increasing demand for CBPR-qualified individuals, few programs exist that are capable of facilitating in-depth and experiential training for both students and those working in communities. This article reviews the Partnerships in Community Health Research (PCHR), a training program at the University of British Columbia that between 2001 and 2009 has equipped graduate student and community-based learners with knowledge, skills, and experience to engage together more effectively using CBPR. With case studies of PCHR learner projects, this article illustrates some of the important successes and lessons learned in preparing CBPR-qualified researchers and community-based professionals in Canada.
PubMed ID
21057046 View in PubMed
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Canada: community stakeholders withdraw from consultation processes with CSC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184044
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2003 Apr;8(1):52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Rick Lines
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2003 Apr;8(1):52
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
HIV Infections - prevention & control - therapy
Hepatitis C - prevention & control - therapy
Humans
Prisons - organization & administration
Abstract
In November, a group of twelve community-based HIV/AIDS organizations and service providers announced their decision to withdraw from participation in consultation processes and committees of the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC).
PubMed ID
12924316 View in PubMed
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Canadian Independent Living Centres: impact on the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197629
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2000 Jun;23(2):61-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
P. Hutchison
A. Pedlar
P. Dunn
J. Lord
S. Arai
Author Affiliation
Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada.
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2000 Jun;23(2):61-74
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Abstract
There is now widespread interest in developing social policies and practices that are grounded in principles of independent living. The Independent Living (IL) paradigm reflects a shift in thinking away from traditional approaches to supporting persons with disabilities. Independent Living Centres (ILCs), which started in the early 1970s in the United States, and in the 1980s in Canada, are now a major force in the promotion of the IL concept worldwide. The guiding principles of these consumer-driven centres include: promoting an empowerment philosophy that incorporates consumer control/self-direction over decision-making; offering cross-disability support; providing options/choice and flexibility; and encouraging inclusion and full participation. Despite their prevalence, a surprisingly limited body of research exists on the impact of ILCs. A survey was used to investigate the impact of ILCs in Canada on their communities of interest (groups connected to the ILCs). Surveys were sent to formal organizations, informal groups, and family/friends. A final response rate of 52.6% was achieved (111 of 211 surveys returned). Overall, moderate to good levels of familiarity, involvement, and impact were found. The results affirmed the importance of independent living centres to individual empowerment, community change, and the IL movement.
PubMed ID
10929658 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.