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Collaboration between communities and universities: completion of a community needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212192
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Apr;13(2):112-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
J C Kulig
I. Wilde
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Apr;13(2):112-9
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Catchment Area (Health)
Community Health Nursing - education
Community Networks
Community-Institutional Relations
Data Collection - methods
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Rural Population
Students, Nursing
Universities
Abstract
Health care reform can provide opportunities for collaboration between universities and the public at large. An advanced community nursing class within a post-RN program at a university combined resources with a nearby rural community to complete a community health and social needs assessment. The partners in the project included the local hospital, health unit, and the university; funding was secured from the Regional Center for Health Promotion and Community Studies and the two health agency partners also made a financial donation. Community liaisons who were both registered nurses and residents of the community, we instrumental in completing tasks and activities related to the project. The students were taught the various data collection methods and participated in class assignments refining the necessary skills required for the actual assessment. This project benefited the community by providing baseline health status and social needs data in an era of dramatic health care reform while simultaneously affording undergraduate nursing students the opportunity to apply theory to practice.
PubMed ID
8936244 View in PubMed
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Controlled trial of a multifaceted intervention for improving quality of care for rural patients with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47333
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Nov;26(11):3061-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Sumit R Majumdar
Lisa M Guirguis
Ellen L Toth
Richard Z Lewanczuk
T K Lee
Jeffrey A Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Nov;26(11):3061-6
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Community-Institutional Relations
Diabetes mellitus, type 2 - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Despite good evidence and clinical practice guidelines, studies document that treatment of type 2 diabetes is less than optimal. Lack of resources or limited access may put patients in rural communities at particular risk for suboptimal care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective, before/after study with concurrent controls to assess the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary diabetes outreach service (intervention) for improving the quality of care for rural patients with type 2 diabetes. Our intervention consisted of six monthly visits by a traveling team of specialist physicians, nurses, dieticians, and a pharmacist. The core of this service was specialist-to-rural primary care physician academic group detailing. Two comparable regions in Northern Alberta were randomly allocated to control or intervention. Data were collected before and 6 months after intervention in a representative volunteer sample. The primary outcome was a 10% improvement in any one of the following: blood pressure, total cholesterol, or HbA(1c). RESULTS: Our analysis included 200 intervention and 179 control subjects; 14 subjects were at all three primary outcome targets at baseline. The intervention was associated with a trend toward improvement in primary outcome at 6 months (44% intervention vs. 37% control; odds ratio 1.32, 95% CI 0.87-1.99). The intervention was associated with a significant improvement in blood pressure (42% intervention vs. 25% control, P = 0.004); however, there were only small, nonsignificant changes in cholesterol or HbA(1c). The intervention was associated with a significant increase in satisfaction with diabetes care. Multivariate adjustment for baseline differences between intervention and control subjects did not affect any of the main results. CONCLUSIONS: A diabetes outreach service has the potential to improve the quality of diabetes care for rural patients. Future studies need to involve longer timelines and larger sample sizes.
PubMed ID
14578240 View in PubMed
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Creating frameworks for providing services closer to home in the context of a network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173216
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(2):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Janice Popp
Kathleen Douglas-England
Ann Casebeer
Suzanne C Tough
Author Affiliation
Southern Alberta Child & Youth Health Network.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(2):27-33
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Alberta
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Networks - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
National Health Programs
Abstract
Networks can be used to develop shared frameworks that extend limited specialized healthcare services beyond tertiary level settings to provide services closer to home. This article provides an overview of networks, describes the context and purpose of the Southern Alberta Child & Youth Health Network, reports on early experiences with implementation of an Outreach Services Framework, and discusses implications from a network perspective.
PubMed ID
16119384 View in PubMed
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Emergency Room Outreach: a new approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152028
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Apr;16(3):311-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
L. Gendreau
Author Affiliation
Child & Adolescent Mental Health Urgent Services, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Apr;16(3):311-3
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community-Institutional Relations - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Feedback, Psychological
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic
Personnel, Hospital
Social Support
PubMed ID
19291162 View in PubMed
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The Feather of Hope Aboriginal AIDS Prevention Society: a community approach to HIV/AIDS prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211546
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):268-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
J E Mill
D A DesJardins
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):268-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration
Abstract
Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a complex and challenging issue for Aboriginal people in Canada. There is a need for HIV/AIDS prevention programs that address the specific needs of Canadian Aboriginal communities in a culturally accepted manner. The Feather of Hope Aboriginal AIDS Prevention Society provides culturally sensitive HIV prevention programs to Aboriginal communities in Alberta. The community development approach used by the Society emphasizes empowerment at the individual and group level. This approach is congruent with the shift to self-determination by Aboriginal people throughout Canada.
PubMed ID
8870307 View in PubMed
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The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing: theory, design, and evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199315
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2000 Feb;18(2):163-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
T L Guidotti
L. Ford
M. Wheeler
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre for Work, Environment & Health, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. eohtlg@gwumc.edu
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2000 Feb;18(2):163-9
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Attitude to Health
Community Networks - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Safety
Social Change
Abstract
The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing is a multifaceted program that applies the techniques of social marketing to health and safety. This paper describes the origins of the project and the principles on which it was based. VENUE: Fort McMurray, in the province of Alberta, Canada, was selected because the community had several community initiatives already underway and the project had the opportunity to demonstrate "value added."
The project is distinguished from others by a model that attempts to achieve mutually reinforcing effects from social marketing in the community as a whole and from workplace safety promotion in particular.
Specific interventions sponsored by the project include a media campaign on cable television, public activities in local schools, a community safety audit, and media appearance by a mascot that provides visual identity to the project, a dinosaur named "Safetysaurus." The project integrated its activities with other community initiatives.
The evaluation component emphasizes outcome measures. A final evaluation based on injury rates and attitudinal surveys is underway.
Baseline data from the first round of surveys have been compiled and published. In 1995, Fort McMurray became the first city in North America to be given membership in the World Health Organization's Safe Community Network.
PubMed ID
10698248 View in PubMed
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Oral health related quality of life and its association with sociodemographic and clinical findings in 3 northern outreach clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78488
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Mar;73(2):153
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Walter Michael H
Woronuk John I
Tan Han-Kuang
Lenz Ulrike
Koch Rainer
Boening Klaus W
Pinchbeck Yvonne J
Author Affiliation
Department of prosthetic dentistry, Faculty of medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Mar;73(2):153
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Community-Institutional Relations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Clinics
Dental Pulp Diseases - psychology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Oral Health
Quality of Life
Rural Health Services
Sex Factors
Sickness Impact Profile
Socioeconomic Factors
Tooth Loss - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Aspects of oral health related quality of life (OHQOL) are attracting increased attention in dentistry. Knowledge in this field is limited, especially in terms of significant indicators and predictors of impaired OHQOL. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the influence of various sociodemographic and clinical variables on OHQOL in the setting of outreach clinics in northern Alberta, Canada. METHODS: OHQOL was measured with the 49-item Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-49), administered to adult patients attending 3 dental outreach clinics managed by the University of Alberta. Sociodemographic and clinical data were also collected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and multivariable methods. RESULTS: The OHIP-49 scores were comparatively low for a patient sample. After multivariable stepwise logistic regression analysis, only gender, missing anterior teeth and need for endodontic treatment remained as significant variables in the final model for impaired OHQOL. Missing anterior teeth (regardless of replacement) had the strongest effect. Subjects with this feature had an approximately 21-fold greater risk of impaired OHQOL relative to those who retained all of their anterior teeth. CONCLUSIONS: The clientele of these outreach clinics was generally young but had high treatment needs. OHQOL results can be useful in considering treatment strategies in similar rural environments, but the complexity of this indicator necessitates an individual patient-centred approach in clinical decision-making.
PubMed ID
17355805 View in PubMed
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Partnering to reverse the trend:early childhood caries conference report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158773
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Dec;73(10):897-900
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Dec-2007

Perspectives of a rural doctor's spouse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163304
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2007;12(2):113-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jerrold Lundgard
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2007;12(2):113-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Child
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Physicians, Family
Rural Health Services - manpower
Spouses
Workload
Notes
Comment On: Can J Rural Med. 2006 Fall;11(4):271-617054827
PubMed ID
17533662 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.