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Continuing education to go: capacity building in psychotherapies for front-line mental health workers in underserviced communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113064
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;58(6):335-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Paula Ravitz
Robert G Cooke
Scott Mitchell
Scott Reeves
John Teshima
Bhadra Lokuge
Andrea Lawson
Nancy McNaughton
Wayne Skinner
Carolynne Cooper
Mark Fefergrad
Ari Zaretsky
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pravitz@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;58(6):335-43
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Capacity Building - methods - organization & administration
Cognitive Therapy - education - organization & administration
Community Mental Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Comorbidity
Curriculum
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Education, Continuing
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Health Personnel - education - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario
Psychotherapy - education - organization & administration
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
To address the gaps between need and access, and between treatment guidelines and their implementation for mental illness, through capacity building of front-line health workers.
Following a learning needs assessment, work-based continuing education courses in evidence-supported psychotherapies were developed for front-line workers in underserviced community settings. The 5-hour courses on the fundamentals of cognitive-behavioural therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, motivational interviewing, and dialectical behaviour therapy each included videotaped captioned simulations, interactive lesson plans, and clinical practice behaviour reminders. Two courses, sequentially offered in 7 underserviced settings, were subjected to a mixed methods evaluation. Ninety-three nonmedical front-line workers enrolled in the program. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess pre- and postintervention changes in knowledge and self-efficacy. Qualitative data from 5 semistructured focus groups with 25 participants were also analyzed.
Significant pre- and postintervention changes in knowledge (P
PubMed ID
23768261 View in PubMed
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Factors predicting practice location and outreach consultation among University of Toronto psychiatry graduates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169656
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Mar;51(4):218-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Brian Hodges
Ava Rubin
Robert G Cooke
Sandy Parker
Edward Adlaf
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario. brian.hodges@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Mar;51(4):218-25
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Choice Behavior
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Health Services - manpower
Ontario
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Psychiatry - education - manpower
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - manpower
Universities
Urban Health Services - manpower
Abstract
To identify the determinants of practice location and of outreach consultation of recently graduated psychiatrists.
We surveyed 153 psychiatrists who graduated from the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry between January 1990 and June 2002 (response rate 51%), on the basis of a self-administered mail questionnaire. The survey assessed factors that influenced practice location and outreach consultation, such as demographics, links to practice communities, and outreach experiences, including rural or northern electives as a resident.
Professional variables were rated as the most important factors in choosing a practice location. Variables such as age or sex were not significantly associated with location. Nine percent reported working in communities of less than 100,000, and only 1% practised in Northern Ontario. Eighteen percent practised in the same location where they were born or raised. Forty-four percent had rural or northern experience as a resident but almost exclusively in the form of short, fly-in consultation electives. Twenty-four percent indicated that they provide outreach consultation. Psychiatry residents who participated in outreach electives were 10 times as likely as those who did not participate to continue outreach as a consultant.
Although early exposure to rural or northern medicine leads to significantly greater continued involvement in outreach activities after graduation, our findings suggest the need for more long-term, on-site residency training opportunities in rural and remote areas.
PubMed ID
16629346 View in PubMed
Less detail