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Applying indigenous community-based participatory research principles to partnership development in health disparities research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134004
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Jul-Sep;34(3):246-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Suzanne Christopher
Robin Saha
Paul Lachapelle
Derek Jennings
Yoshiko Colclough
Clarice Cooper
Crescentia Cummins
Margaret J Eggers
Kris Fourstar
Kari Harris
Sandra W Kuntz
Victoria Lafromboise
Deborah Laveaux
Tracie McDonald
James Real Bird
Elizabeth Rink
Lennie Webster
Author Affiliation
Montana State University, Bozeman 59717, USA. suzanne@montana.edu
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Jul-Sep;34(3):246-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Health Services Research
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Intervention Studies
Questionnaires
Trust
United States
Universities
Abstract
This case study of community and university research partnerships utilizes previously developed principles for conducting research in the context of Native American communities to consider how partners understand and apply the principles in developing community-based participatory research partnerships to reduce health disparities. The 7 partnership projects are coordinated through a National Institutes of Health-funded center and involve a variety of tribal members, including both health care professionals and lay persons and native and nonnative university researchers. This article provides detailed examples of how these principles are applied to the projects and discusses the overarching and interrelated emergent themes of sharing power and building trust.
PubMed ID
21633218 View in PubMed
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Ethical challenges and lessons learned from Inuulluataarneq - "Having the Good Life" study: a community-based participatory research project in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114085
Source
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2013 Apr;8(2):110-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Elizabeth Rink
Ruth Montgomery-Andersen
Anders Koch
Gert Mulvad
Dionne Gesink
Author Affiliation
Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA. elizabeth.rink@montana.edu
Source
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2013 Apr;8(2):110-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research - ethics
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Cultural Competency
Decision Making
Ethics Committees, Research
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Policy
Humans
International Cooperation
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Research Design
Residence Characteristics
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Social Responsibility
Sociology, Medical - ethics
Abstract
We present the ethical challenges and lessons learned over the course of a four-year community-based participatory research (CBPR) project conducted on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Greenland. Specifically discussed is Inuulluataarneq-the "Having the Good Life" study. Inuulluataarneq is an interdisciplinary international, collaborative CBPR study involving the University of Toronto in Canada, the Greenlandic Medical Research Council, the Centre for Primary Care in Nuuk, the University of Greenland, local health partners and communities in Greenland, the Statens Serum Institut in Denmark, and Montana State University in the United States. Inuulluataarneq is the first CBPR project implemented in Greenland. Ethical issues discussed are: (1) the complexity of working with multiple institutional review boards on an international health research project using a CBPR framework; (2) unexpected influences on health policy; and (3) the dynamic of balancing community decision making and practices with academic research requirements and expectations. Inuulluataarneq's primary contribution to understanding ethical issues when conducting research in the Arctic involves an acceptance of the time, patience, and dedication of researchers and community partners it takes to discuss, understand, and process differing ethical viewpoints and procedures.
PubMed ID
23651935 View in PubMed
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Integrating a theoretical framework with street outreach services: issues for successful training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213325
Source
Public Health Rep. 1996;111 Suppl 1:83-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
R. Cheney
A. Merwin
Author Affiliation
Philadelphia Health Management Corporation, PA 19102-5085, USA.
Source
Public Health Rep. 1996;111 Suppl 1:83-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
Allied Health Personnel - education
Community-Institutional Relations
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Role Playing
Abstract
HIV/AIDS prevention projects utilizing indigenous outreach workers often rely on the life experiences and skills of the staff to structure the intervention, without grounding in theory. However, to be most effective, community outreach projects which target harder-to-reach high-risk populations should both utilize and enhance the natural strengths of indigenous field workers' experience and style of interaction, while guiding intervention content with theoretical rigor. In this paper we demonstrate that the challenge of successfully integrating a theoretically guided program design with field staff's credibility with, and sensitivity toward, drug-using clients can be practically and satisfactorily met through appropriate training. This training is an important investment for better utilizing valued and scarce prevention resources. The Philadelphia site of the AIDS Evaluation of Street Outreach Project (AESOP), a cooperative agreement of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, designed and implemented staff trainings to reflect the enhancement of the outreach program by the Stages of Change model. Through these trainings, the outreach workers have learned to integrate their natural street and intervention skills into the structure of a theoretical framework. This paper presents specific training components, relevant issues within these components, and areas for evaluation and feedback.
Notes
Cites: AIDS Educ Prev. 1989 Summer;1(2):105-182641228
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1992 May;111(3):455-741594721
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1996;111 Suppl 1:69-748862160
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Sep;47(9):1102-141329589
Cites: Prog Behav Modif. 1992;28:183-2181620663
PubMed ID
8862162 View in PubMed
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The practical application of community-based participatory research in Greenland: initial experiences of the Greenland Sexual Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147343
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):405-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Elizabeth Rink
Dionne Gesink Law
Ruth Montgomery-Andersen
Gert Mulvad
Anders Koch
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Human Development, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3540, USA. elizabeth.rink@montana.edu
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):405-13
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Increasingly, community-based participatory research (CBPR), with its emphasis on engaging communities as full and equal partners in all phases of the research process is being promoted to address the health needs of peoples living in the North American Arctic. However, the CBPR approach is not without its challenges in Arctic countries such as Greenland, where research capacity, different languages, distance, time and cost become barriers to remaining true to the purest form of CBPR. In this paper, we describe the practical application of CBPR principles and methodologies to a sexual health project investigating sexually transmitted infections in Greenland. We present the initial challenges encountered in the early stages of the pilot CBPR sexual health study, and solutions to these challenges. We also provide recommendations for expanding the capacity in Greenland to conduct CBPR projects.
PubMed ID
19917192 View in PubMed
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