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296 records – page 1 of 30.

1992 Ontario Survey of Public Health Nurses: perceptions of roles and activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218313
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L W Chambers
J. Underwood
T. Halbert
C A Woodward
J. Heale
S. Isaacs
Author Affiliation
Hamilton-Wentworth Department of Public Health Services, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Institutional Relations
Health promotion
Humans
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
A survey of public health nurses (PHNs) who work in official public health units in Ontario was undertaken to determine whether their perceptions of their roles and activities concurred with a 1990 Canadian Public Health Association report which describes the roles and qualifications of public health nursing in Canada. The survey questionnaire was completed by 1,849 PHNs in all 42 public health units (response rate = 85%). About one tenth of the PHNs reported no activity as a caregiver/service provider. Most PHNs reported being active in the roles of educator/consultant, social marketer, and facilitator/communicator/collaborator. The community developer, policy formulator, research/evaluator, and resource manager/planner/coordinator roles were less frequently performed, however, increased activities in such roles were expected in the future. Nurses said that they needed further preparation to perform the latter roles. These results have implications for deployment of PHNs as Ontario's health system shifts to community health and health promotion.
PubMed ID
7922961 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal women caregivers of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160837
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kay E Crosato
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Beverly Leipert
Author Affiliation
The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Kay.Crosato@halton.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural - methods
Caregivers
Community-Institutional Relations
Culture
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Social Values
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop a comprehensive understanding of Aboriginal women's experiences and perceptions of providing care to the elderly in geographically isolated communities (GIC). Research with Aboriginal women caregivers is essential as the population of Aboriginal elders is increasing, and Aboriginal women represent the majority of caregivers in their communities.
This study was guided by focused ethnography, which seeks an understanding of a sub-group within a cultural group by uncovering the less obvious expressions and behaviours of the sub-group members. Using one-on-one open-ended interviews and participant observation, 13 women from a number of Aboriginal communities in northern and southern Ontario participated in this study. Data analysis was conducted by reviewing transcripts of interviews to identify codes and themes.
Study findings revealed that four concentric circles represent the caring experiences of the Aboriginal women participants: the healers, the family, the Aboriginal community, and the non-Aboriginal community. Cultural values greatly informed participants' perceptions about caring for elderly persons in GIC. These values are represented in five themes: passing on traditions, being chosen to care, supporting the circle of healers, (re)establishing the circles of care, and accepting/refusing external resources.
The findings from this study have significant implications for healthcare practice and future research.
PubMed ID
17935459 View in PubMed
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Academic practice-policy partnerships for health promotion research: experiences from three research programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259816
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Charli C-G Eriksson
Ingela Fredriksson
Karin Fröding
Susanna Geidne
Camilla Pettersson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Program Evaluation
Research Personnel - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The development of knowledge for health promotion requires an effective mechanism for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policymakers. The challenge is better to understand the dynamic and ever-changing context of the researcher-practitioner-policymaker-community relationship.
The aims were to explore the factors that foster Academic Practice Policy (APP) partnerships, and to systematically and transparently to review three cases.
Three partnerships were included: Power and Commitment-Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden; Healthy City-Social Inclusion, Urban Governance, and Sustainable Welfare Development; and Empowering Families with Teenagers-Ideals and Reality in Karlskoga and Degerfors. The analysis includes searching for evidence for three hypotheses concerning contextual factors in multi-stakeholder collaboration, and the cumulative effects of partnership synergy.
APP partnerships emerge during different phases of research and development. Contextual factors are important; researchers need to be trusted by practitioners and politicians. During planning, it is important to involve the relevant partners. During the implementation phase, time is important. During data collection and capacity building, it is important to have shared objectives for and dialogues about research. Finally, dissemination needs to be integrated into any partnership. The links between process and outcomes in participatory research (PR) can be described by the theory of partnership synergy, which includes consideration of how PR can ensure culturally and logistically appropriate research, enhance recruitment capacity, and generate professional capacity and competence in stakeholder groups. Moreover, there are PR synergies over time.
The fundamentals of a genuine partnership are communication, collaboration, shared visions, and willingness of all stakeholders to learn from one another.
PubMed ID
25416579 View in PubMed
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Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284320
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Geary J1, Jardine CG, Guebert J, Bubela T.
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations/legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Financing, Government
Genetics, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
Genetics, Medical/organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American/ethnology
Indians, North American/genetics
Indians, North American/legislation & jurisprudence
Documents
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Access to outreach specialist palliative care teams among cancer patients in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114285
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Aug;16(8):951-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Mette Asbjoern Neergaard
Anders Bonde Jensen
Frede Olesen
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
The Palliative Team, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. mettneer@rm.dk
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Aug;16(8):951-7
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Community-Institutional Relations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - physiopathology - therapy
Palliative Care - manpower - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Registries
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization
Terminal Care - manpower - organization & administration
Young Adult
Abstract
Equal access to end-of-life care is important. However, social inequality has been found in relation to place-of-death. The question is whether social and economic factors play a role in access to specialist palliative care services.
The study analyzed the association between access to outreach specialist palliative care teams (SPCTs) and socioeconomic characteristics of Danish cancer patients who died of their cancer.
The study was a population-based, cross-sectional register study. We identified 599 adults who had died of cancer from March 1 to November 30, 2006, in Aarhus County, Denmark. Data from health registers were retrieved and linked based on the unique personal identifier number.
Multivariate analysis with adjustment for age, gender, and general practitioner (GP) involvement showed a higher probability of contact with an SPCT among immigrants and descendants of immigrants than among people of Danish origin (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04;2.31) and among married compared to unmarried patients (PR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01;1.54). The trends were most marked among women.
We found an association between females, married patients, and female immigrants and their descendants and access to an SPCT in Denmark. However, no association with the examined economic factor was found. Need for specialized health care, which is supposed to be the main reason for access to an SPCT, may be related to economic imbalance; and despite the relative equality found, SPCT access may not be equal for all Danish residents. Further research into social and economic consequences in palliative care services is warranted.
PubMed ID
23631614 View in PubMed
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All's fair. A unique EMS fair helps children learn what to do in an emergency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5937
Source
Emerg Med Serv. 1992 Jun;21(6):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992

An engagement and access model for healthcare delivery to adolescents with mood and anxiety concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128740
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;6(1):97-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Erin Ross
Evelyn Vingilis
Elizabeth Osuch
Author Affiliation
FEMAP, London, Canada.
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;6(1):97-105
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Ontario
Program Evaluation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Mood and anxiety disorders typically begin during adolescence or early adulthood. Yet services targeting this population are frequently lacking. This study implemented an outreach, access and assessment programme for youth with these concerns. The data reported constitute an evaluation of this mental healthcare delivery approach.
This evaluation included specification of both programme and implementation theories through causal and programme logic models and formative (process) evaluation. Outreach focused on access points for youth such as schools and family physicians' offices. Concerned youth were encouraged to self-refer. Participants completed a semi-structured clinical interview and symptom and function questionnaire package.
Engagement sessions were conducted and results involved 93 youth. The majority of youth self-referred, a process not possible in traditional physician-referral healthcare systems. Interestingly, almost half had received prior treatment and over half had tried a psychiatric medication. Yet participants had significant symptomatology: 81% reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms; 95% reported high levels of trait-anxiety. Functional impairment was substantial: on average, participants missed 2.6 days of school/work and functioned at reduced levels on 4.2 days in the week prior to assessment. Demographic details are presented.
This study evaluated a mental healthcare delivery system that identified individuals with significant distress and functional impairment from mood/anxiety concerns and previous unsuccessful treatment attempts, verifying that they were in need of mental health services. This approach provides a model for outreach and assessment in this population, where earlier intervention has the potential to prevent chronic mental illness and disability.
PubMed ID
22171651 View in PubMed
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An Icelandic saga on a centralized healthcare database and democratic decision making.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201445
Source
Nat Biotechnol. 1999 Jul;17(7):620
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999

296 records – page 1 of 30.