Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14 records – page 1 of 2.

Reaching suicidal people with media campaigns: new challenges for a new century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165668
Source
Crisis. 2006;27(4):172-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Marc Daigle
Louise Beausoleil
Jacques Brisoux
Sylvaine Raymond
Lucie Charbonneau
Julie Desaulniers
Author Affiliation
University of Québec at Trois-Rivières, Canada. marc.daigle@uqtr.ca
Source
Crisis. 2006;27(4):172-80
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Mass Media - trends
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Five variables were investigated in the evaluation of Suicide Prevention Weeks (SPW) held in 1999, 2000, and 2001 in Québec, Canada: exposure to the campaign, previous suicide ideation, knowledge, attitudes, and intentions. After the year 2000 campaign, a telephone survey conducted on a representative sample of 1020 men revealed that only those actually exposed to the SPW had gained more knowledge of suicide facts and resources. However, the SPW did not influence attitudes or intentions to seek help. Results are not surprising, considering the low intensity of the campaign, especially in the media. Campaigns aimed at changing suicidal behaviors must be intensive.
PubMed ID
17219749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experiences of termination of pregnancy for a fetal anomaly: A qualitative study of virtual community messages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283024
Source
Midwifery. 2016 Oct;41:54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Tommy Carlsson
Gunnar Bergman
Anna-Malin Karlsson
Barbro Wadensten
Elisabet Mattsson
Source
Midwifery. 2016 Oct;41:54-60
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Eugenic - psychology
Adult
Community-Institutional Relations - standards
Female
Fetus - abnormalities
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Qualitative Research
Social Media - standards
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
to explore experiences described by posters in Swedish virtual communities before, during and after termination of pregnancy due to a fetal anomaly.
cross-sectional qualitative study of messages in virtual communities. The messages were purposefully selected in 2014 and analyzed with inductive qualitative manifest content analysis.
two large and active Swedish virtual communities.
1623 messages from 122 posters (112 females, 1 male, and 9 did not disclose their sex), written between 2008 and 2014. The majority of the posters were females (91%) with recent experience of termination of pregnancy following different prenatal diagnoses (63% less than one year since the termination).
before the termination, posters experienced an emotional shock and a difficult decision. During the termination, they needed compassionate care from present caregivers, experienced intense emotional and physical pain, lacked an understanding about the abortion, and expressed varied feelings about the option to view the fetus. After the termination, posters used different strategies to come to terms with and accept the decision, experienced a perinatal loss, expressed fears of recurrence, and longed for a new child.
spanning across the time before, during and after the abortion, women who terminate a pregnancy due to a fetal anomaly express considerable physical and emotional pain, with psychosocial and reproductive consequences.
information and preparation, including the decision whether or not to view the fetus, are important aspects to consider when caring for individuals who have decided to terminate a pregnancy for a fetal anomaly. The findings indicate a need for structures that offer support to women who suffer from fears of recurrence in future pregnancies.
PubMed ID
27543968 View in PubMed
Less detail

Spiritual care in the last phase of life: a comparison between the Church of Sweden and the Church of Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136170
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2010;64(3):3.1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Anne Birgitta Pessi
Anna Whitaker
Elina Juntunen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden. evagr@isv.liu.se
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2010;64(3):3.1-10
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Community-Institutional Relations
Finland
Humans
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Pastoral Care - organization & administration
Religion and Medicine
Social Support
Spirituality
Sweden
Abstract
This article deals with the Church of Sweden and the Church of Finland and their spiritual support for parishioners during their end-of-life phase. Support for the dying seemed uncommon in both countries, while most parishes offered support for the bereaved. The Finnish respondents expressed more confidence in their spiritual role than did the Swedes. This may have to do with the role of the churches in their respective countries and the varying geographies of death.
PubMed ID
21404732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Care of the elderly at home: serving the family in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242737
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1982 Dec;49(5):163-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1982
Author
S D Marjoribanks
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1982 Dec;49(5):163-7
Date
Dec-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community-Institutional Relations
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Humans
Ontario
Social Environment
Social Support
Abstract
This is a report on a community seminar, jointly sponsored by Toronto East General and Orthopaedic Hospital and the Borough of East York. The object was to provide information, support and a milieu for discussion for those caring for an elderly person at home. The planning committee included health-care professionals and agencies from both the hospital and the community. Two questionnaires were distributed and results indicated that the objectives had been met.
PubMed ID
10258174 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Injection Support Team: a peer-driven program to address unsafe injecting in a Canadian setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126048
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):491-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Will Small
Evan Wood
Diane Tobin
Jacob Rikley
Darcy Lapushinsky
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):491-501
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community-Institutional Relations
Drug users
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Observation
Peer Group
Risk Reduction Behavior
Social Support
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Abstract
In 2005, members of the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) formed the Injection Support Team (IST). A community-based research project examined this drug-user-led intervention through observation of team activities, over 30 interviews with team members, and 9 interviews with people reached by the team. The IST is composed of recognized "hit doctors," who perform outreach in the open drug scene to provide safer injecting education and instruction regarding safer assisted-injection. The IST represents a unique drug-user-led response to the gaps in local harm reduction efforts including programmatic barriers to attending the local supervised injection facility.
Notes
Comment In: Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):555-722428823
Comment In: Subst Use Misuse. 2012 Apr;47(5):558-6522428824
PubMed ID
22428817 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seamless and committed collaboration as an essential factor in effective mentorship for nursing students: conceptions of Finnish and British mentors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124239
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 May;33(5):437-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Merja Jokelainen
Kerttu Tossavainen
David Jamookeeah
Hannele Turunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. merja.jokelainen@savonia.fi
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 May;33(5):437-43
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community-Institutional Relations
Education, Nursing - methods
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mentors
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Motivation
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
The effective mentorship of nursing students requires that mentors have a range of personal qualities. However, it is also essential to consider the role of other participants, such as colleagues in placement settings and educators in educational institutions, as well as the relationship with students.
This aim of this study was to describe Finnish and British mentors' (n=39) conceptions of the factors that affect the provision of effective mentorship for pre-registration nursing students in healthcare placements.
The data in this qualitative study were collected by focus group interviews and analysed using a phenomenographical approach.
The findings highlighted the factors governing seamless and committed collaboration with all stakeholders involved in student mentorship. Mentors considered that their own advantageous attitude, capabilities and competence, supportive co-operation with colleagues and lecturers, and enthusiasm and active participation of students were all significant factors determining the effectiveness of student mentorship.
Nursing organisations and educational units need to develop a well-defined and robust partnership strategy for student mentorship, which would clarify the roles of all stakeholders. This would help to ensure the availability and quality of students' placement learning and mentorship, and develop the joint preparation programmes for student mentorship.
PubMed ID
22608827 View in PubMed
Less detail

Laying the groundwork for broadly based partnerships: the perceived influence of the National Forum on Breast Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208231
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Jun;1(2):141-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997

Emergency Room Outreach: a new approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152028
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Apr;16(3):311-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
L. Gendreau
Author Affiliation
Child & Adolescent Mental Health Urgent Services, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Apr;16(3):311-3
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community-Institutional Relations - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Feedback, Psychological
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic
Personnel, Hospital
Social Support
PubMed ID
19291162 View in PubMed
Less detail

Different kinds of services and informal support in the daily life activities in a community-based elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72997
Source
Aging (Milano). 1995 Oct;7(5):371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
G. Gosman-Hedström
U. Sonn
A. Aniansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Aging (Milano). 1995 Oct;7(5):371-8
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Community Health Services
Community-Institutional Relations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Home Care Services
Housing
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Transportation
Abstract
As part of the well-known population study of 70-year olds in Gothenburg, 1239 persons at the age of 70 were invited to participate in an extensive investigation and Inter-Vention program of the Elderly in Gothenburg (IVEG). The probands were examined at the ages of 70, 73 and 76 years. The purpose of this study is to describe different kinds of services and informal support in the daily life activities among three large groups of people in their seventies. A cross-sectional study design was chosen in order to get as large groups as possible. A home call was made by an experienced occupational therapist, who interviewed and observed the probands' performance in the daily life activities. The probands and their relatives were asked about the extent of different services and informal support. Personal and home assistance care given by relatives almost doubled between the age of 70 and 76 years. Help organized by the Social Welfare Services only increased marginally. Of the personal activities of daily living (ADL), getting in/out of a bathtub was the activity that caused most problems. The most common walking aid was a stick or a crutch, while use of a wheelchair was quite uncommon. Between the age of 70 and 76 years, the use of the Handicap Transport Service more than doubled. This study shows that at the age of about 73 years the elderly should be offered formal support, such as the supply of assistive devices. What is noteworthy is that the help from relatives and friends increased much more than the help from the Social Welfare Services between the age of 70 and 76 years. At present, relatives and friends assist the elderly in their homes to a large extent, and frequently. Relatives are doing an important job for their elderly and for society, and should be given every possible kind of public support and relief in order to have the strength to continue.
PubMed ID
8719604 View in PubMed
Less detail

Professional, personal and community: 3 domains of physician retention in rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124535
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(2):47-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Pamela J Cameron
David C Este
Catherine A Worthington
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(2):47-55
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Choice Behavior
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - psychology
Qualitative Research
Rural Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
Social Support
Abstract
We sought to explore the professional, personal and community domains of physician retention in 4 rural communities in Alberta and to develop a preliminary framework for physician retention.
We used a qualitative, collective case study design to study 4 rural communities (cases) in Alberta that retained family physicians for 4 years or longer. Participants included physicians, staff members, spouses and community members. Data collected from interviews, documents and observations were analyzed individually, and similarities and differences across all cases were assessed.
A range of factors that could influence physicians' decisions to stay in a particular community were described by participants. Within the professional domain, physician supply, physician dynamics, scope of practice and practice set-up were common across all communities, and innovation, and management and support emerged from some communities. The personal factors, goodness-of-fit, individual choice, and spousal and family support were present in all communities. Four community factors--appreciation, connection, active support, and physical and recreational assets--emerged across all communities, and reciprocity was present in 3 communities. From these data, we developed a preliminary retention framework.
Physicians, policy-makers and community members are encouraged to consider the 3 retention domains of professional, personal and community.
PubMed ID
22572063 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.