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Are we in a pickle? Rethinking the world of research and user interaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133678
Source
Healthc Pap. 2011;11(2):42-6; discussion 64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Patricia J Martens
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2011;11(2):42-6; discussion 64-7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Health Services Research - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Knowledge Management
Abstract
The lion's tail and knowledge boundaries are two analogies referred to in the lead essay by Lindstrom, MacLeod and Levy. These may be helpful but require slight readjustment. Grabbing onto the lion's tail implies one reality and one intersection point, whereas the old analogy of the blind men and the elephant shows that various perspectives are required. Integrated knowledge translation refers to user involvement throughout the research process. Participatory models are one form of integrated knowledge translation, but caution is required to help maintain the knowledge boundaries. There is the real danger of one group becoming "pickled," or having unbalanced osmotic pressure from another group, resulting in destroyed "cell wall" boundaries. Neither researchers nor users should morph into each other but should, rather, fulfill unique roles within a respectful, trusted research relationship. Lessons learned at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy teach us that collaborative health services research takes time, money, mutual understanding and respect (including respect from academic institutions for this paradigm of research). This requires a dedicated centre of core group scientists willing to devote the necessary time. Diffused networks may not be stable enough to maintain the long-term relationship building required for the intersection of researchers and decision-makers.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2011;11(2):10-2421677513
PubMed ID
21677517 View in PubMed
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Community-based participatory research: development of an emergency department-based youth violence intervention using concept mapping.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141838
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2010 Aug;17(8):877-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Carolyn E Snider
Maritt Kirst
Shakira Abubakar
Farah Ahmad
Avery B Nathens
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine (Emergency Medicine), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sniderc@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2010 Aug;17(8):877-85
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Concept Formation
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Parents
Qualitative Research
Violence - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Emergency departments (EDs) see a high number of youths injured by violence. In Ontario, the most common cause of injury for youths visiting EDs is assault. Secondary prevention strategies using the teachable moment (i.e., events that can lead individuals to make positive changes in their lives) are ideal for use by clinicians. An opportunity exists to take advantage of the teachable moment in the ED in an effort to prevent future occurrences of injury in at-risk youths. However, little is known about perceptions of youths, parents, and community organizations about such interventions in EDs. The aims of this study were to engage youths, parents, and frontline community workers in conceptualizing a hospital-based violence prevention intervention and to identify outcomes relevant to the community.
Concept mapping is an innovative, mixed-method research approach. It combines structured qualitative processes such as brainstorming and group sorting, with various statistical analyses such as multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering, to develop a conceptual framework, and allows for an objective presentation of qualitative data. Concept mapping involves multiple structured steps: 1) brainstorming, 2) sorting, 3) rating, and 4) interpretation. For this study, the first three steps occurred online, and the fourth step occurred during a community meeting.
Over 90 participants were involved, including youths, parents, and community youth workers. A two-dimensional point map was created and clusters formed to create a visual display of participant ideas on an ED-based youth violence prevention intervention. Issues related to youth violence prevention that were rated of highest importance and most realistic for hospital involvement included mentorship, the development of youth support groups in the hospital, training doctors and nurses to ask questions about the violent event, and treating youth with respect. Small-group discussions on the various clusters developed job descriptions, a list of essential services, and suggestions on ways to create a more youth-friendly environment in the hospital. A large-group discussion revealed outcomes that participants felt should be measured to determine the success of an intervention program.
This study has been the springboard for the development of an ED-based youth violence intervention that is supported by the community and affected youth. Using information generated by youth that is grounded in their experience through participatory research methods is feasible for the development of successful and meaningful youth violence prevention interventions.
PubMed ID
20670326 View in PubMed
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Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107789
Source
Pages 967-977 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):967-977
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Pamela K Miller
Viola Waghiyi
Gretchen Welfinger-Smith
Samuel Carter Byrne
Jane Kava
Jesse Gologergen
Lorraine Eckstein
Ronald Scrudato
Jeff Chiarenzelli
David O Carpenter
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Author Affiliation
Alaska Community Action on Toxics, Anchorage, AK 99503, USA. pamela@akaction.org
Source
Pages 967-977 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):967-977
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Health - methods - organization & administration
Fishes
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Health Policy
Humans
Islands - epidemiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Abstract
This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI), Alaska, during the years 2000-2012.
As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR) studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a) a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b-d) 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape--using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e) a study of traditional foods.
Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north.
An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations.
As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012, a series of exposure assessments demonstrate that the leaders of SLI have reason to be concerned about the health of people due to the presence of carcinogenic chemicals as measured in biomonitoring and environmental samples and important traditional foods.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23977641 View in PubMed
Documents
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Evaluation of a community-based participatory research consortium from the perspective of academics and community service providers focused on child health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136605
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2011 Jun;38(3):271-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Jayne R Pivik
Hillel Goelman
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. jayne.pivik@ubc.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2011 Jun;38(3):271-81
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child Welfare
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Practice
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Universities
Abstract
A process evaluation of a consortium of academic researchers and community-based service providers focused on the health and well-being of children and families provides empirical and practice-based evidence of those factors important for community-based participatory research (CBPR). This study draws on quantitative ratings of 33 factors associated with CBPR as well as open-ended questions addressing the benefits, facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for collaboration. Eight distinct but related studies are represented by 10 academic and 9 community researchers. Even though contextual considerations were identified between the academic and community partners, in large part because of their focus, organizational mandate and particular expertise, key factors for facilitating collaboration were found across groups. Both community and academic partners reported the following as very important for positive collaborations: trust and mutual respect; adequate time; shared commitment, decision making, and goals; a memorandum of understanding or partnership agreement; clear communication; involvement of community partners in the interpretation of the data and information dissemination; and regular meetings. The results are compared to current models of collaboration across different contexts and highlight factors important for CBPR with community service providers.
PubMed ID
21364234 View in PubMed
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Exploring facilitators and barriers to individual and organizational level capacity building: outcomes of participation in a community priority setting workshop.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142527
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2010 Jun;17(2):34-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Laura M Flaman
Candace I J Nykiforuk
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kim Raine
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 5-10 University Terrace, 8303-112 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2T4. candace.nykiforuk@ualberta.ca
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2010 Jun;17(2):34-43
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Consumer Participation - methods
Education
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Resources - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Resource Allocation - organization & administration
Social Marketing
Abstract
This article explores facilitators and barriers to individual and organizational capacity to address priority strategies for community-level chronic disease prevention. Interviews were conducted with a group of participants who previously participated in a community priority-setting workshop held in two Alberta communities. The goal of the workshop was to bring together key community stakeholders to collaboratively identify action strategies for preventing chronic diseases in their communities. While capacity building was not the specific aim of the workshop, it could be considered an unintended byproduct of bringing together community representatives around a specific issue. One purpose of this study was to examine the participants' capacity to take action on the priority strategies identified at the workshop. Eleven one-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with workshop participants to examine facilitators and barriers to individual and organizational level capacity building. Findings suggest that there were several barriers identified by participants that limited their capacity to take action on the workshop strategies, specifically: (i) organizations' lack of priorities or competing priorities; (ii) priorities secondary to the organizational mandate; (iii) disconnect between organizational and community priorities; (iv) disconnect between community organization priorities; (v) disconnect between organizations and government/funder priorities; (vi) limited resources (i.e. time, money and personnel); and, (vii) bigger community issues. The primary facilitator of individual capacity to take action or priority strategies was supportive organizations. Recognition of these elements will allow practitioners, organizations, governments/funders, and communities to focus on seeking ways to improve capacity for chronic disease prevention.
PubMed ID
20587629 View in PubMed
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NATIVE-It's Your Game: Adapting a Technology-Based Sexual Health Curriculum for American Indian and Alaska Native youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289981
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):27-48
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Ross Shegog
Stephanie Craig Rushing
Gwenda Gorman
Cornelia Jessen
Jennifer Torres
Travis L Lane
Amanda Gaston
Taija Koogei Revels
Jennifer Williamson
Melissa F Peskin
Jina D'Cruz
Susan Tortolero
Christine M Markham
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, The University of Texas School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, 7000 Fannin Street, Suite 2668, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. Ross.Shegog@uth.tmc.edu.
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):27-48
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Alaska - epidemiology
Alaska Natives - education
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Cultural Competency
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Plan Implementation - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Internet
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - ethnology - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Sexual Health - education
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Sexually transmitted infection (STI) and birth rates among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth indicate a need for effective middle school HIV/STI and pregnancy prevention curricula to delay, or mitigate, the consequences of early sexual activity. While effective curricula exist, there is a dearth of curricula with content salient to AI/AN youth. Further, there is a lack of sexual health curricula that take advantage of the motivational appeal, reach, and fidelity of communication technology for this population, who are sophisticated technology users. We describe the adaptation process used to develop Native It's Your Game, a stand-alone 13-lesson Internet-based sexual health life-skills curriculum adapted from an existing promising sexual health curriculum, It's Your Game-Tech (IYG-Tech). The adaptation included three phases: (1) pre-adaptation needs assessment and IYG-Tech usability testing; (2) adaptation, including design document development, prototype programming, and alpha testing; and (3) post-adaption usability testing. Laboratory- and school-based tests with AI/AN middle school youth demonstrated high ratings on usability parameters. Youth rated the Native IYG lessons favorably in meeting the needs of AI/AN youth (54-86 % agreement across lessons) and in comparison to other learning channels (57-100 %) and rated the lessons as helpful in making better health choices (73-100 %). Tribal stakeholders rated Native IYG favorably, and suggested it was culturally appropriate for AI/AN youth and suitable for implementation in tribal settings. Further efficacy testing is indicated for Native IYG, as a potential strategy to deliver HIV/STI and pregnancy prevention to traditionally underserved AI/AN middle school youth.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27520459 View in PubMed
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Project h?li?dx(w)/Healthy Hearts Across Generations: development and evaluation design of a tribally based cardiovascular disease prevention intervention for American Indian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120833
Source
J Prim Prev. 2012 Aug;33(4):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Karina L Walters
June LaMarr
Rona L Levy
Cynthia Pearson
Teresa Maresca
Selina A Mohammed
Jane M Simoni
Teresa Evans-Campbell
Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen
Sheryl Fryberg
Jared B Jobe
Author Affiliation
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, School of Social Work, University of Washington, 4101 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. kw5@uw.edu
Source
J Prim Prev. 2012 Aug;33(4):197-207
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Cultural Competency
Family Relations - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Motivational Interviewing
Northwestern United States - epidemiology
Parents - education
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations are disproportionately at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and obesity, compared with the general US population. This article describes the h?li?dx(w)/Healthy Hearts Across Generations project, an AIAN-run, tribally based randomized controlled trial (January 2010-June 2012) designed to evaluate a culturally appropriate CVD risk prevention program for AI parents residing in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. At-risk AIAN adults (n = 135) were randomly assigned to either a CVD prevention intervention arm or a comparison arm focusing on increasing family cohesiveness, communication, and connectedness. Both year-long conditions included 1 month of motivational interviewing counseling followed by personal coach contacts and family life-skills classes. Blood chemistry, blood pressure, body mass index, food intake, and physical activity were measured at baseline and at 4- and 12-month follow-up times.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22965622 View in PubMed
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Reconciling traditional knowledge, food security, and climate change: experience from Old Crow, YT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104280
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Vasiliki Douglas
Hing Man Chan
Sonia Wesche
Cindy Dickson
Norma Kassi
Lorraine Netro
Megan Williams
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Culture
Focus Groups
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preservation - economics - methods
Food Storage - economics - methods
Food Supply - economics - methods
Gardening - education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Nutritional Sciences - education
Transportation - economics - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Because of a lack of transportation infrastructure, Old Crow has the highest food costs and greatest reliance on traditional food species for sustenance of any community in Canada's Yukon Territory. Environmental, cultural, and economic change are driving increased perception of food insecurity in Old Crow.
To address community concerns regarding food security and supply in Old Crow and develop adaptation strategies to ameliorate their impact on the community.
A community adaptation workshop was held on October 13, 2009, in which representatives of different stakeholders in the community discussed a variety of food security issues facing Old Crow and how they could be dealt with. Workshop data were analyzed using keyword, subject, and narrative analysis techniques to determine community priorities in food security and adaptation.
Community concern is high and favored adaptation options include agriculture, improved food storage, and conservation through increased traditional education. These results were presented to the community for review and revision, after which the Vuntut Gwitchin Government will integrate them into its ongoing adaptation planning measures.
PubMed ID
24859099 View in PubMed
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