Skip header and navigation

Refine By

246 records – page 1 of 25.

A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jun;136(6):790-616022046
Cites: Clin Oral Investig. 2003 Jun;7(2):63-7012768463
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Apr 19;295(15):1775-8316622139
Cites: J Dent. 2006 Aug;34(7):427-3516314023
Cites: Dent Mater J. 2006 Sep;25(3):611-517076335
Cites: J Dent. 2007 Feb;35(2):124-916956709
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2007 Jun;138(6):763-7217545265
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2007 Jun;138(6):775-8317545266
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2007 Sep-Oct;122(5):657-6317877313
Cites: J Adhes Dent. 2007 Oct;9(5):469-7518297828
Cites: Br Dent J. 2003 Jun 14;194(11):613-8; discussion 60912819697
Cites: J Dent. 2012 Oct;40(10):829-3522771415
Cites: J Dent. 2003 Aug;31(6):395-40512878022
Cites: J Med Syst. 2003 Oct;27(5):445-5614584621
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2004 May;135(5):637-4515202758
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1988 May;116(6):651-43164030
Cites: J Dent. 1996 Jul;24(4):257-628783530
Cites: Oper Dent. 1994 Jul-Aug;19(4):127-329028231
Cites: Br Dent J. 1997 May 24;182(10):373-819185355
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1998 Dec;129(12):1757-99854929
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Mar;116(3):394-918335109
Cites: J Dent. 2008 May;36(5):343-5018313826
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2010 Apr;141(4):441-820354094
Cites: J Dent. 2005 Nov;33(10):827-3516246480
Cites: J Dent. 2012 May;40(5):397-40522342563
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Oct;57(5):257-6210614902
Cites: J Dent. 2000 Feb;28(2):111-610666968
Cites: J Adhes Dent. 2001 Spring;3(1):45-6411317384
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Apr;59(2):57-6211370750
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2001 Dec;18(4):236-4111789702
Cites: Oper Dent. 2002 Sep-Oct;27(5):488-9212216568
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2010 Mar;27(1):18-2220426256
Cites: J Dent Res. 2010 Oct;89(10):1063-720660797
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Apr;142(4):429-4021454850
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Jun;142(6):622-3221628683
Cites: Dent Mater. 2012 Jan;28(1):87-10122192253
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2012 May;88(5):797-80122395198
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
Less detail

'About time!' Insights from Research with Pride: a community-student collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131754
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Kira A Abelsohn
Jessica M Ferne
Kyle A Scanlon
Broden L Giambrone
Sivan B Bomze
Author Affiliation
The 519 Church Street Community Centre, Toronto, Canada. kira.abelsohn@gmail.com
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Ontario
Students
Universities
Abstract
Research with Pride (RwP) was a community-student collaborative initiative to promote and build capacity for community-based research exploring health and wellness in lesbian, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) communities. The event took place at University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health (DLSPH) in September 2009, and engaged over 100 students, community members and academic researchers in a full day of discussion, learning and networking. RwP was initiated by a group of graduate students in Health Promotion who identified a gap in resources addressing LGBTQ health, facilitating their further learning and work in this area. By engaging in a partnership with a community service organization serving LGBTQ communities in downtown Toronto, RwP emerges as a key example of the role of community-student partnerships in the pursuit of LGBTQ health promotion. This paper will describe the nature of this partnership, outline its strengths and challenges and emphasize the integral role of community-student partnerships in health promotion initiatives.
PubMed ID
21880613 View in PubMed
Less detail

The adaptation and implementation of a community-based participatory research curriculum to build tribal research capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265381
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Jul;105 Suppl 3:S424-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan
Tvli Jacob
Dennis Styne
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Jul;105 Suppl 3:S424-32
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Community-Based Participatory Research
Curriculum
Education, Professional - organization & administration
Focus Groups
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
United States
Abstract
We studied community-based participatory research in American Indian/Alaska Native communities. We have presented a case study describing a community-clinic-academic partnership with the goal of building tribal capacity and infrastructure to conduct health disparities research. The 2-year intensive training was guided by the framework of an evidence- and community-based participatory research curriculum, adapted and implemented with practice-based data collection activities and seminars to address issues specific to community-based participatory research with sovereign tribal nations. The initiative highlighted important challenges and opportunities in transdisciplinary partnerships; identified gaps in conducting health disparities research at the tribal, clinical, and university levels; and led to important policy change initiatives in all the partner settings.
Notes
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1988 Apr;15(4):684-903260954
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;2(3):7-172490286
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):755S-759S10195598
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Jan;105(1):131-815635359
Cites: Cancer Control. 2005 Nov;12 Suppl 2:70-616327753
Cites: Cancer Control. 2006 Jul;13(3):230-616885920
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2006 Jul;7(3):312-2316760238
Cites: J Urban Health. 2006 Nov;83(6):989-100317082993
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Jan 24;297(4):407-1017244838
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Jan;98(1):22-718048800
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S71-619246668
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2009 Jul 24;58(RR-7):1-2619629029
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-8320220114
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Jul 15;363(3):204-720538622
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2010 Nov;11(6):888-9919376928
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2011 Mar;12(2):261-7020534807
Cites: Clin Transl Sci. 2010 Oct;3(5):233-821500397
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2011 Sep;37(5):333-821854275
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2012 Aug;27(4):645-5521994709
Cites: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2012 Fall;6(3):289-9922982842
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2013 Jul;14(4):524-3323091303
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2185-9223678897
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2146-5224134372
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2160-424134381
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S263-724754649
Cites: Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67 Suppl 1:S51-724513172
Cites: Sci Eng Ethics. 2006 Jul;12(3):491-50716909151
Cites: West J Nurs Res. 2001 Mar;23(2):126-4711272853
Cites: J Nurs Scholarsh. 2001;33(3):253-811552552
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2002 Jan-Feb;19(1):47-5811841682
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Apr;92(4):520-411919043
Cites: Prev Sci. 2002 Sep;3(3):235-4012387557
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 2003 Sep-Oct;24(8):674-9612959868
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2003 Dec;32(3-4):207-1614703257
PubMed ID
25905848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation in Arctic circumpolar communities: food and water security in a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289270
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
James Berner
Michael Brubaker
Boris Revitch
Eva Kreummel
Moses Tcheripanoff
Jake Bell
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA; jberner@anthc.org.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Communicable diseases
Community-Based Participatory Research
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Water supply
Abstract
The AMAP Human Health Assessment Group has developed different adaptation strategies through a long-term collaboration with all Arctic countries. Different adaptation strategies are discussed, with examples mainly from native population groups in Alaska.
Notes
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:57-93 PMID 16154621
Cites: Biochem Mol Med. 1997 Aug;61(2):236-9 PMID 9259989
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2012 Nov;14(11):2854-69 PMID 23014859
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2009 Nov 11;2:null PMID 20052432
Cites: J Wildl Dis. 2014 Apr;50(2):297-307 PMID 24484497
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Jan 1;414:22-42 PMID 22104383
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 23;71:18792 PMID 22868189
Cites: J Wildl Dis. 2014 Apr;50(2):271-8 PMID 24484499
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:null PMID 23399790
PubMed ID
27974139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting Western research methods to indigenous ways of knowing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113851
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2185-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Vanessa W Simonds
Suzanne Christopher
Author Affiliation
Vanessa W. Simonds is with the Department of Community and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City. Suzanne Christopher is with the Department of Health and Human Development at Montana State University, Bozeman.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2185-92
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research - ethics - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Research Design
United States
Western World
Abstract
Indigenous communities have long experienced exploitation by researchers and increasingly require participatory and decolonizing research processes. We present a case study of an intervention research project to exemplify a clash between Western research methodologies and Indigenous methodologies and how we attempted reconciliation. We then provide implications for future research based on lessons learned from Native American community partners who voiced concern over methods of Western deductive qualitative analysis. Decolonizing research requires constant reflective attention and action, and there is an absence of published guidance for this process. Continued exploration is needed for implementing Indigenous methods alone or in conjunction with appropriate Western methods when conducting research in Indigenous communities. Currently, examples of Indigenous methods and theories are not widely available in academic texts or published articles, and are often not perceived as valid.
PubMed ID
23678897 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing challenges in participatory research partnerships in the North: opening a conversation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120750
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Rhonda M Johnson
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Community-Based Participatory Research - ethics
Health Services Research
Humans
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):8-1817451130
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):19-3017451131
Cites: J Urban Health. 2007 Jul;84(4):478-9317436114
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):405-1319917192
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-922584512
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):473-8722067096
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-822584509
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-722584510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-722584511
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2010 Mar;25(1):115-2219854843
PubMed ID
22973564 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska Native Health Research Conference 2006: Making it work for you: Responding to community needs -- Abstracts and poster sessions

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100793
Source
Abstracts and poster sessions from the Alaska Native Health Research Conference, Anchorage, Alaska, March 30-31, 2006
Date
2006
Source
Abstracts and poster sessions from the Alaska Native Health Research Conference, Anchorage, Alaska, March 30-31, 2006
Date
2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Keywords
Center for Alaska Native Health Research (CANHR)
Community-Based Participatory Research
Education and Research towards Health (EARTH)
Genetics of coronary artery disease in Alaska Natives (GOCADAN)
Genetics research
Nicotine research in western Alaska
Research in liver disease in Alaska Natives
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100793.
Less detail

American Indian community leader and provider views of needs and barriers to mammography

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101408
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Apr;37(2):307-315
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Daley, CM
Filippi, M
James, AS
Weir, M
Braiuca, S
Kaur, B
Choi, WS
Greiner, KA
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine & Public Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, cdaley@kumc.edu.
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Apr;37(2):307-315
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Indian
Barriers to care
Breast cancer
Community-Based Participatory Research
Mammography
Abstract
Breast cancer incidence is rising and mortality is disproportionately high among American Indians and Alaska Natives, yet screening rates remain low. Using community-based participatory research, we conducted interviews with community leaders (n=13) and providers from the Indian Health Service, tribal clinics, and urban safety-net clinics (n=17). Participants in both groups identified similar needs, including culturally-appropriate mammography education, use of Native elders as patient navigators, and an emphasis on preventive care. Pertinent barriers included culturally-specific issues (e.g., historic mistrust and gender roles), cost, transportation, and fear of mammography and potential results. The results reflect the struggles of promoting mammography across diverse populations.
PubMed ID
21786207 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyzing the state of community health nursing: advancing from deficit to strengths-based practice using appreciative inquiry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159544
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Candace Lind
Dawn Smith
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4. cylind@ucalgary.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education - methods - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
School Health Services - organization & administration
Social Justice
Abstract
In this article we critically analyze the disconnect between much of the contemporary discourse and practice in Canadian community health nursing (CHN) that has contributed to the slow progress of strengths-based, health-promoting nursing practice. Appreciative inquiry philosophy and methods are introduced as a bridge to traverse this disciplinary gap. Two exemplars show how appreciative, strengths-based CHN research and action can move policies and programs toward more socially just practices congruent with CHN values. Exciting potential for nursing knowledge may arise from incorporating more strengths-based approaches into practice, education, policy, and research.
PubMed ID
20531267 View in PubMed
Less detail

An argument for practice-based public health research on sexually transmitted infection management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133144
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2011 Jul-Aug;28(4):357-65
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patrick O'Byrne
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. pjobyrne@uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2011 Jul-Aug;28(4):357-65
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Evidence-Based Practice - methods
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Public Health Practice - statistics & numerical data
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - therapy - transmission
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Over the last few years, the rates of certain sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have again begun to rise in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Paradoxically, these increases are occurring at the same time that greater numbers of researchers are publishing reports about highly successful safer sex interventions. Research that investigates this phenomenon reveals that the majority of new STIs management initiatives never reach day-to-day practice after the research period has terminated. In reaction to this, it is suggested here that researchers should begin developing their STIs management interventions in practice-based settings, with a strong emphasis being placed on ensuring target group input from the outset. While such an approach may not be able to discern precise cause-and-effect relationships, it has the benefit of enhancing use after researchers have withdrawn their support. The benefits that arise from long-term and widespread use of this approach may therefore outweigh the advantages that can occur from developing highly efficacious, but unused, STIs management strategies.
PubMed ID
21736614 View in PubMed
Less detail

246 records – page 1 of 25.