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Forward to ecological description of a multi-level community-based cultural intervention: reflections on culturally-situated participatory research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266100
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):81-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Nathaniel V Mohatt
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):81-2
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community-Based Participatory Research
Culture
Humans
Inuits
PubMed ID
24912874 View in PubMed
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The realities encountered while introducing the community-based participatory research approach in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96075
Source
Pages 475-476 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
THE REALITIES ENCOUNTERED WHILE INTRODUCING THE COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH APPROACH IN GREENLAND E. Rink, D. Gesink-Law, R. Montgomery-Andersen, U. Poppel, A. Binzer, 5. Montgomery-Andersen, A. Koch, G. Mulvad Montana State University Community consultation has been used to
  1 document  
Author
Rink, E.
Gesink-Law, D.
Montgomery-Andersen, R.
Poppel, U.
Binzer, A.
Montgomery-Andersen, S.
Koch, A.
Mulvad, G.
Author Affiliation
Montana State University
Source
Pages 475-476 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Community-based participatory research (CBPR)
Community consultation
Greenland
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 11. Community-based Participatory Research.
Documents
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American Indian community leader and provider views of needs and barriers to mammography

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101408
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Apr;37(2):307-315
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Daley, CM
Filippi, M
James, AS
Weir, M
Braiuca, S
Kaur, B
Choi, WS
Greiner, KA
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine & Public Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, cdaley@kumc.edu.
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Apr;37(2):307-315
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Indian
Barriers to care
Breast cancer
Community-Based Participatory Research
Mammography
Abstract
Breast cancer incidence is rising and mortality is disproportionately high among American Indians and Alaska Natives, yet screening rates remain low. Using community-based participatory research, we conducted interviews with community leaders (n=13) and providers from the Indian Health Service, tribal clinics, and urban safety-net clinics (n=17). Participants in both groups identified similar needs, including culturally-appropriate mammography education, use of Native elders as patient navigators, and an emphasis on preventive care. Pertinent barriers included culturally-specific issues (e.g., historic mistrust and gender roles), cost, transportation, and fear of mammography and potential results. The results reflect the struggles of promoting mammography across diverse populations.
PubMed ID
21786207 View in PubMed
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Establishing a sentinel surveillance system for HIV-associated risk behaviours among Aboriginal populations in Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286426
Source
Page 520 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
M. Aslam
S. Ogunnaike-Cooke
D. Boulos
C.P. Archibald
A-Track Working Group
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Public Health Agency of Canada
Source
Page 520 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
HIV/AIDS
Aboriginal
Second generation surveillance
Behavioural surveillance
Surveys
Community-Based Participatory Research
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 13. Building Health Services Resources and Research Capacity.
Documents
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Community-based participatory research with indigenous communities: the proximity paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256556
Source
Health Place. 2013 Nov;24:183-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Stephen D Ritchie
Mary Jo Wabano
Jackson Beardy
Jeffrey Curran
Aaron Orkin
David VanderBurgh
Nancy L Young
Author Affiliation
School of Rural and Northern Health, Laurentian University Ramsey Lake Road Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6; ECHO (Evaluating Children's Health Outcomes) Research Centre and Laurentian University Ramsey Lake Road Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6. Electronic address: sritchie@laurentian.ca.
Source
Health Place. 2013 Nov;24:183-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Ontario
Population Groups
Rural Population
Abstract
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a promising approach used with increasing prevalence in health research with underserviced Indigenous communities in rural and remote locations. This case comparison used CBPR principles to examine the characteristics of two collaborative research projects in Canada. Both projects reflected CBPR principles in unique ways with particular differences related to community access and proximity of collaborating partners. CBPR principles are often used and recommended for partnerships involving remote underserviced communities, however many of these principles were easier to follow for the collaboration with a relatively well serviced community in close proximity to researchers, and more challenging to follow for a remote underserviced community. The proximity paradox is an apparent contradiction in the increasing application of CBPR principles for use in distal partnerships with remote Indigenous communities when many of these same principles are nearly impossible to follow. CBPR principles are much easier to apply in proximal partnerships because they afford an environment where collaborative relationships can be developed and sustained.
PubMed ID
24140703 View in PubMed
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"Step-by-step we are stronger": women's empowerment through photovoice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134796
Source
J Community Health Nurs. 2011 Apr;28(2):105-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Lynne Duffy
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada. lduffy@unb.ca
Source
J Community Health Nurs. 2011 Apr;28(2):105-16
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Humans
Photography
Power (Psychology)
Women - psychology
Abstract
Photovoice, as one method of participatory action research, has been used to better understand local realities and promote health in many countries and with diverse populations. It has been especially effective as a process for women to explore health and contextual issues often related to oppression and marginalization. This article discusses the impact of a photovoice process on a small group of lone mothers carrying out a community health assessment in eastern Canada. According to the women, their level of empowerment increased considerably in the 2 years of the study and their stories of the project's impact provide the evidence.
PubMed ID
21541872 View in PubMed
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Establishing a sentinel surveillance system for HIV-associated risk behaviours among aboriginal populations in Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96115
Source
Pages 552-555 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Mubeen Aslam
Susanna Ogunnaike-Cooke
David Boulos
Chris P. Archibald
A-Track Working Group
Author Affiliation
Surveillance & Risk Assessment Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
Source
Pages 552-555 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
HIV/AIDS
, Aboriginal, second
Generation surveillance
Behavioural surveillance
Surveys
Community-Based Participatory Research
Abstract
Objectives: Available data from routine surveillance systems are unable to adequately explain the current status and trends of HIV infection and related risk behaviours among Aboriginal peoples; additional data sources are required. This paper outlines the framework to establish a sentinel HIV surveillance system among Aboriginal (First Nations, Metis, Inuit) peoples in Canada. Methods: The Public Health Agency of Canada is working with Aboriginal representatives to develop A-Track, a second -generation HIV/AlDS surveillance system. Work is underway to finalize the surveillance instruments and to identify pilot site(s) in consultation with the A-Track Working Group. Results: A national enhanced HIV surveillance system among Aboriginal populations envisages biological and behavioural surveillance via repeated cross-sectional surveys with consistent sampling strategy, data collection methods and indicators to monitor trends in HIV- related risk behaviours, HIV-testing history, and knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS, over time. The biological component will be optional, and testing for pathogens other than HIV is subject to validity of specimen collection and testing methods. The system underscores Aboriginal involvement at all stages, recognizes Aboriginal peoples' shared control over jurisdictional data and respects Aboriginal customs. The pilot survey will be launched in 2009-10. Conclusions: Successful design and implementation of a sentinel HIV surveillance system 552 Circumpolar Health Supplements 2010; 7 among Aboriginal peoples entails community engagement, utilization of existing infrastructures and enhanced Aboriginal capacity-building. A better understanding of HIV-related risk behaviours and HIV prevalence over time will facilitate improved policy and program interventions at the local, provincial/territorial and federal levels in order to prevent and control HIV infection among Aboriginal populations.
Documents
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Participatory health research: celebrating smoke-free homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107298
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Sep;59(9):1014-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Vivian R Ramsden
Shari McKay
Shirley Bighead
Gail Boucher
Carrie Bourassa
Peter Butt
Andrea Clinton
Jackie Crowe
Fred Felix
Derek Jorgenson
Karen LaRocque
Nora McKee
Irene Nketia
Norma Rabbitskin
Ella Thunderchild
Cheryl Troupe
Tara Turner
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Sep;59(9):1014-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Saskatchewan
Smoking - prevention & control
Abstract
For community engagement to be successful, the interests of the community must be taken into account and researchers must become facilitators. Patience is required. Meaningful and sustainable relationships that have been developed over time promote mutual learning and capacity building among the partners (Elders, community members, health care providers, and researchers). In addition, community engagement leads to the sharing of available resources (eg, human, time, and financial) and to a sustained commitment by the partners. This mutual commitment makes future projects easier to develop and complete. Thus, authentic transformative health development, informed by participatory health research, becomes an ongoing process.
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2003 Feb;49:195-7, 200-212619744
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1998;19:173-2029611617
Cites: Glob Health Promot. 2010 Dec;17(4):32-4221510097
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2006 Jul;7(3):312-2316760238
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2006 Dec;21(4):293-30016873393
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Sep 18;319(7212):774-810488012
PubMed ID
24029518 View in PubMed
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Is knowledge translation without patient or community engagement flawed?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291495
Source
Fam Pract. 2017 06 01; 34(3):259-261
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2017
Author
Vivian R Ramsden
Norma Rabbitskin
John M Westfall
Maret Felzien
Janice Braden
Jessica Sand
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Fam Pract. 2017 06 01; 34(3):259-261
Date
06-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research
Humans
Patient Participation
Research Design
Translational Medical Research - ethics
Abstract
The engagement of patients/individuals and/or communities has become increasingly important in all aspects of the research process.
The aim of this manuscript is to begin the discussion about the use and implementation of authentic engagement in the development of presentations and manuscripts which evolve from research that has engaged patients/individuals and/or communities.
Community-Based Participatory Research; Transformative Action Research.
In Canada, the framework for engaging patients/individuals and/or communities is clearly outlined in Chapter 9 of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans which indicates that when research projects involving First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples, the peoples in these communities are to have a role in shaping/co-creating the research that affects them. It is increasingly important that presentations and manuscripts that evolve from results/findings which have engaged patients/individuals and/or communities be co-presented/co-published. Presentations are often done without patients/individuals and/or communities and manuscripts published with only academic authors. Frequently, grants submitted and subsequently funded do not consider this aspect of the process in the budget which makes integrated and outcome knowledge translation, dissemination and distribution by and with patients/individuals and/or communities difficult to facilitate.
This manuscript was designed to begin the discussion at various levels related to authentic engagement in the development of presentations and manuscripts which evolve from research that has engaged patients/individuals and/or communities. How will you include patients/individuals and/or communities in your presentations and publications?
PubMed ID
27920121 View in PubMed
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"Walking along beside the researcher": how Canadian REBs/IRBs are responding to the needs of community-based participatory research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126577
Source
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2012 Feb;7(1):15-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Adrian Guta
Stephanie Nixon
Jacquie Gahagan
Sarah Fielden
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, 155 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. adrian.guta@utoronto.ca
Source
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2012 Feb;7(1):15-25
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Based Participatory Research
Community-Institutional Relations
Ethics Committees
Ethics Committees, Research
Humans
Abstract
Research ethics boards and institutional review boards (REBs/IRBs) have been criticized for relying on conceptions of research that privilege biomedical, clinical, and experimental designs, and for penalizing research that deviates from this model. Studies that use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) design have been identified as particularly challenging to navigate through existing ethics review frameworks. However, the voices of REB/IRB members and staff have been largely absent in this debate. The objective of this article is to explore the perspectives of members of Canadian university-based REBs/IRBs regarding their capacity to review CBPR protocols. We present findings from interviews with 24 Canadian REB/IRB members, staff, and other key informants. Participants were asked to describe and contrast their experiences reviewing studies using CBPR and mainstream approaches. Contrary to the perception that REBs/IRBs are inflexible and unresponsive, participants described their attempts to dialogue and negotiate with researchers and to provide guidance. Overall, these Canadian REBs/IRBs demonstrated a more complex understanding of CBPR than is typically characterized in the literature. Finally, we situate our findings within literature on relational ethics and explore the possibility of researchers and REBs/IRBs working collaboratively to find solutions to unique ethical tensions in CBPR.
PubMed ID
22378131 View in PubMed
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246 records – page 1 of 25.