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156 records – page 1 of 16.

A 6-month prospective study of hospital-acquired bacteremia in Copenhagen county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34967
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(6):601-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A G Jensen
A. Kirstein
I. Jensen
J. Scheibel
F. Espersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Herlev University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(6):601-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cross Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Abstract
During a 6-month period, 892 positive blood cultures were detected in the Copenhagen County hospitals. 302 (34%) were regarded as contaminations, and of the remaining cases 419 (71%) were community-acquired and 171 (29%) hospital-acquired, giving incidence rates of 6.8/1,000 admissions and 2.8/1,000 admissions, respectively. Both frequency and rate of hospital-acquired bacteremia were lower compared to most other studies. E. coli was more commonly found in community-acquired infections, while coagulase-negative staphylococci were the organisms most often considered as a contaminant. The main causative organisms in hospital-acquired infections were S. aureus (n = 37) and E. coli (n = 34). The proportion of polymicrobial bacteremias in this study was lower compared to most other studies (8%). E. coli from hospital-acquired infections were resistant to ampicillin in 42% of cases, but other Enterobacteriaceae showed higher percentage of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. S. aureus was penicillin-resistant in 92% of cases, but no methicillin-resistant strains were isolated. The frequency of antibiotic resistance was low compared to reports from other countries. A total of 136 hospital-acquired cases were followed prospectively. 61% of the patients were male and 46% were > or = 60 years of age. Most patients had predisposing diseases, 90% had foreign body and/or recent surgery performed, and 74 (54%) had an intraveneous catheter. The portal of entry was known in 132 (97%) of the cases, the most common being the urinary tract (42%), followed by an intravenous catheter (30%). The prevalence of urinary tract catheters gave an increased number of cases with E. coli bacteremia. The mortality was 16%.
PubMed ID
9060064 View in PubMed
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[About non-specific prophylaxis of infections typical for organized groups].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117398
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2012 Nov;333(11):51-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
V V Valevskii
V V Alekseev
G G Mar'in
A A Sobolev
O A Gruzdeva
N N Tsapkova
A V Tutel'ian
G I Poriadina
T A Salmina
A Iu Riazanova
M A Sokolov
D V Sibilev
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2012 Nov;333(11):51-6
Date
Nov-2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Humans
Immunity, Cellular - drug effects
Immunity, Humoral - drug effects
Military Personnel
Plant Preparations - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Pyoderma - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Russia
Seasons
Abstract
Respiratory tract infections and pyodermia are typical for personnel doing military service under conscription. Risk of progression of these infections is connected with activation of carry-over of causative agents among military personnel during replacement and decrease in immunity of conscripts. Usage of medication "Karmolis Kapli" for the purpose of prophylaxis allows to reduce cases of respiratory tract infections among the military personnel. Among the military servicemen who had take "Karmolis Kapli" was noted reduction of community-acquired pneumonia, tonsillitis and pyodermia morbidity. Non-specific protective effect of medication "Karmolis Kapli" is conditioned by increase of the common resistance of the body. For the purpose of prophylaxis it is necessary to use this medication during the personnel formation before the beginning of seasonal morbidity.
PubMed ID
23301292 View in PubMed
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[About the results of using vaccine "Pneumo-23" in Northern fleet].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151637
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2009 Feb;330(2):11-3, 96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
V V Rybachenko
V K Sementsov
V M Manuilov
S P Zabolotnyi
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2009 Feb;330(2):11-3, 96
Date
Feb-2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Bronchitis - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Military Personnel
Naval Medicine
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Russia
Seasons
Treatment Outcome
Vaccination
Abstract
Outhospital pneumonia and bronchitis by service men by call-up in Northern fleet is still high. In 2004 for prophylaxis of these diseases in calendar of prophylactic immunization for service men was used vaccine "Pneumo-23" of the firm "Aventis Paster" (France). In the autumn period 900 call-up persons were vaccined. There was analyzed the dynamic of morbidity of bronchitis and outhospital pneumonia among the call-up persons during following 4 months. Veridical reduction of morbidity in analyzed groups of vaccined and not vaccined wasn't found. It was proposed to realize vaccination by "Pneumo-23" for 1-3 months earlier the call-up.
PubMed ID
19351018 View in PubMed
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Absolute efficacy of acellular pertussis vaccines in household settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59127
Source
Dev Biol Stand. 1997;89:153-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J. Storsaeter
L. Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Sachs' Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Dev Biol Stand. 1997;89:153-9
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines
Disease Transmission, Horizontal
Disease Transmission, Vertical
Family Characteristics
Follow-Up Studies
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Pertussis Vaccine
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Whooping Cough - prevention & control - therapy
Abstract
Household studies in the two recently concluded Swedish pertussis vaccine efficacy trials demonstrated that one monocomponent and one five-component candidate acellular pertussis vaccine had reasonably good protective efficacy against clinically typical pertussis after household exposure. Another recently concluded German household study, led from Mainz, also demonstrated reasonably good efficacy for a three-component acellular pertussis vaccine. The methods of case ascertainment and duration of follow-up had a marked influence on the efficacy estimates of another candidate two-component acellular pertussis vaccine. This vaccine and a U.S. licensed commercial whole-cell vaccine had very low efficacy against pertussis infection after household exposure. Differences in methodology preclude direct comparisons between the efficacy estimates obtained in various household studies.
PubMed ID
9272345 View in PubMed
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Activity of telithromycin and comparators against isolates of Legionella pneumophila collected from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections: PROTEKT Years 1-5.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78204
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Jul;13(7):743-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Dunbar L M
Farrell D J
Author Affiliation
LSU Health Science Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. ldunba@lsuhsc.edu
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Jul;13(7):743-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Ketolides - pharmacology
Legionella pneumophila - drug effects - isolation & purification
Legionnaires' Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
World Health
Abstract
The in-vitro activity of telithromycin and comparator antibacterial agents was determined against clinical isolates of Legionella pneumophila collected in the PROTEKT surveillance study. In total, 133 isolates were collected between 1999 and 2004 from 13 countries (Australia, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the USA). MICs were determined by broth microdilution. Telithromycin maintained activity between Year 1 (MIC(90) 0.015 mg/L) and Year 5 (MIC(90) 0.03 mg/L), as did the comparator antibacterial agents. Telithromycin appears to be a candidate for coverage of legionellosis in the empirical treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infection.
PubMed ID
17403130 View in PubMed
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[Acute diseases and trauma of thorax and abdomen in patients with hemocontact viral infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138580
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2010;(9):24-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
M A Godkov
Sh N Danielian
M M Abakumov
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2010;(9):24-9
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Communicable disease control
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Comorbidity
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology - surgery
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Disease Transmission, Infectious - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Humans
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Abstract
Screening of hemocontact viral infections (HVI) (HIV, hepatitis B and C) was conducted among patients of the emergency thoraco-abdominal surgery unit. During the 8 years of the study the HVI detection had increased on 57.4%. Gender analysis showed greater HVI prevalence among men. Medico-social criteria of HVI risk-groups among patients of the emergency thoraco-abdominal surgery unit were stated.
PubMed ID
21164418 View in PubMed
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Aetiology and risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281873
Source
Clin Respir J. 2016 Nov;10(6):756-764
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Wenche Røysted
Øystein Simonsen
Andrew Jenkins
Marjut Sarjomaa
Martin Veel Svendsen
Eivind Ragnhildstveit
Yngvar Tveten
Anita Kanestrøm
Halfrid Waage
Jetmund Ringstad
Source
Clin Respir J. 2016 Nov;10(6):756-764
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, data on the aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in hospitalized patients are limited. The aims of this study were to investigate the bacterial aetiology of CAP in hospitalized patients in Norway, risk factors for CAP and possible differences in risk factors between patients with Legionnaire's disease and pneumonia because of other causes.
Adult patients with radiologically confirmed CAP admitted to hospital were eligible for the study. Routine aerobic and Legionella culture of sputum, blood culture, urinary antigen test for Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pneumoniae, polymerase chain reaction detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Bordetella pertussis from throat specimens, and serology for L.?pneumophila serogroup 1-6 were performed. A questionnaire, which included demographic and clinical data, risk factors and treatment, was completed.
We included 374 patients through a 20-month study period in 2007-2008. The aetiological agent was detected in 37% of cases. S.?pneumoniae (20%) was the most prevalent agent, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (6%) and Legionella spp. (6%). Eight Legionella cases were diagnosed by urinary antigen test, of which four also had positive serology. In addition, 13 Legionella cases were diagnosed by serology. The degree of comorbidity was high. An increased risk of hospital-diagnosed Legionella pneumonia was found among patients with a diagnosis of chronic congestive heart failure.
Our results indicate that S.?pneumoniae is the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia in hospitalized patients, and the prevalence of Legionella pneumonia is probably higher in Norway than recognized previously.
PubMed ID
25764275 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections in southwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30882
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2003 Jun;24(6):397-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Henry C Baggett
Thomas W Hennessy
Richard Leman
Cindy Hamlin
Dana Bruden
Alisa Reasonover
Patricia Martinez
Jay C Butler
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2003 Jun;24(6):397-402
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Methicillin Resistance
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Staphylococcal Skin Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We investigated a large outbreak of community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in southwestern Alaska to determine the extent of these infections and whether MRSA isolates were likely community acquired. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Rural southwestern Alaska. PATIENTS: All patients with a history of culture-confirmed S. aureus infection from March 1, 1999, through August 10, 2000. RESULTS: More than 80% of culture-confirmed S. aureus infections were methicillin resistant, and 84% of MRSA infections involved skin or soft tissue; invasive disease was rare. Most (77%) of the patients with MRSA skin infections had community-acquired MRSA (no hospitalization, surgery, dialysis, indwelling line or catheter, or admission to a long-term-care facility in the 12 months before infection). Patients with MRSA skin infections were more likely to have received a prescription for an antimicrobial agent in the 180 days before infection than were patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus skin infections. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that the epidemiology of MRSA in rural southwestern Alaska has changed and suggest that the emergence of community-onset MRSA in this region was not related to spread of a hospital organism. Treatment guidelines were developed recommending that beta-lactam antimicrobial agents not be used as a first-line therapy for suspected S. aureus infections.
Notes
Comment In: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2003 Jun;24(6):392-612828313
PubMed ID
12828314 View in PubMed
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Bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with bloodstream infection: frequencies of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns from the SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program (United States and Canada, 1997).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205155
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1998 Jul;42(7):1762-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
M A Pfaller
R N Jones
G V Doern
K. Kugler
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City 52242, USA. mpfaller@blue.weeg.uiowa.edu
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1998 Jul;42(7):1762-70
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Canada - epidemiology
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The SENTRY Program was established in January 1997 to measure the predominant pathogens and antimicrobial resistance patterns of nosocomial and community-acquired infections over a broad network of sentinel hospitals in the United States (30 sites), Canada (8 sites), South America (10 sites), and Europe (24 sites). During the first 6-month study period (January to June 1997), a total of 5,058 bloodstream infections (BSI) were reported by North American SENTRY participants (4,119 from the United States and 939 from Canada). In both the United States and Canada, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were the most common BSI isolates, followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci. Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and beta-hemolytic streptococci were also among the 10 most frequently reported species in both the United States and Canada. Although the rank orders of pathogens in the United States and Canada were similar, distinct differences were noted in the antimicrobial susceptibilities of several pathogens. Overall, U.S. isolates were considerably more resistant than those from Canada. The differences in the proportions of oxacillin-resistant S. aureus isolates (26.2 versus 2.7% for U.S. and Canadian isolates, respectively), vancomycin-resistant enterococcal isolates (17.7 versus 0% for U.S. and Canadian isolates, respectively), and ceftazidime-resistant Enterobacter sp. isolates (30.6 versus 6.2% for U.S. and Canadian isolates, respectively) dramatically emphasize the relative lack of specific antimicrobial resistance genes (mecA, vanA, and vanB) in the Canadian microbial population. Among U.S. isolates, resistance to oxacillin among staphylococci, to vancomycin among enterococci, to penicillin among pneumococci, and to ceftazidime among Enterobacter spp. was observed in both nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens, although in almost every instance the proportion of resistant strains was higher among nosocomial isolates. Antimicrobial resistance continues to increase, and ongoing surveillance of microbial pathogens and resistance profiles is essential on national and international scales.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9661018 View in PubMed
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[Bacteriological monitoring of infective agents of purulent septic diseases in an emergency hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186316
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Jan-Feb;(1):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
D D Men'shikov
R F Astaf'eva
B L Kurilin
I V Grunenkova
N N Lashenkova
S V Kuprikov
E D Men'shikova
V A Vasil'ev
Author Affiliation
Sklifosovsky Research Institute of Emergency Aid, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Jan-Feb;(1):10-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Emergencies
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Cocci - isolation & purification
Hospitals
Humans
Moscow - epidemiology
Proteus - isolation & purification
Pseudomonas - isolation & purification
Sepsis - epidemiology - microbiology
Suppuration - microbiology
Abstract
During the period of 1995-2001 bacteriological examination of 13,842 patients with purulent septic diseases (PSD) was carried out. The statistical processing of data revealed that equalization of the dynamic rows of intensive and extensive values characterizing the number of patients with PSD caused by etiologically important infective agents made it possible to evaluate the reliability of information. A trend to increased etiological importance of the genera Pseudomonas, Escherichia and Klebsiella was established. The number of diseases caused by Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Proteus decreased.
PubMed ID
12630345 View in PubMed
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156 records – page 1 of 16.