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Alaska telemedicine: Growth through collaboration

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6392
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):365-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
  1 website  
Author
Patricoski, C
Author Affiliation
Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. cpatricoski@afhcan.org
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):365-86
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network (AFHCAN)
Alaska Federal Healthcare Partnership (AFHCP)
Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council (ATAC)
Alaska Telemedicine Testbed Project (ATTP)
Community health aide program (CHAP)
Satellite communication
Telehealth
Telemedicine
Wide area network (WAN)
Abstract
The last thirty years have brought the introduction and expansion of telecommunications to rural and remote Alaska. The intellectual and financial investment of earlier projects, the more recent AFHCAN Project and the Universal Service Administrative Company Rural Health Care Division (RHCD) has sparked a new era in telemedicine and telecommunication across Alaska. This spark has been flamed by the dedication and collaboration of leaders at he highest levels of organizations such as: AFHCAN member organizations, AFHCAN Office, Alaska Clinical Engineering Services, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership Office, Alaska Native health Board, Alaska Native Tribal health Consortium, Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council, AT&T Alascom, GCI Inc., Health care providers throughout the state of Alaska, Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of U.S. Senator Ted Steens, State of Alaska, U.S. Department of Homeland Security--United States Coast Guard, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Defense--Air Force and Army, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, University of Alaska, and University of Alaska Anchorage. Alaska now has one of the largest telemedicine programs in the world. As Alaska moves system now in place become self-sustaining, and 2) collaborating with all stakeholders in promoting the growth of an integrated, state-wide telemedicine network.
PubMed ID
15709313 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation: Looking back at twenty years of service

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96203
Publication Type
Report
Date
1993
Author
Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation
Date
1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Native Service
Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC)
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Aleut
Athapaskan
Bristol Bay region
Cannery doctors
Christianity
Community health aide program (CHAP)
Dillingham
Health aides
Influenza-measles epidemic
Iliamna Lake region
Indian Health Care Improvement Act of 1976
Indian Health Service
Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975
Kanakanak Hospital
Midlevel practitioners
Missionaries
Mortality rates
Nushagak River region
PL 93-638
Public health nurses
Smallpox
Traditional Native healers
Tuberculosis
Yup'ik
Abstract
The Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC) was the first tribal organization in the United States to use a P.L. 93-638 contract to manage and operate an Indian Health Service Unit. BBAHC was formed on behalf of 32 village tribes in 1973 and began managing and operating Kanakanak Hospital and Bristol Bay Area Service Unit in 1980. Twenty years have passed since the corporation took on its mission to provide health care programs to Native and other residents of Bristol Bay.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 96203.
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Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010 Fall-Winter;27(2):24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Fall-Winter-2010
Author
Nunes, A
Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010 Fall-Winter;27(2):24
Date
Fall-Winter-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community health aide program (CHAP)
Dental Health Aide Therapists (DHATs)
Oral Health
Regional culture
Remote communities
University of Washington
Abstract
Roughly three-quarters of Alaska is inaccessible by automobile, and dental care is provided, in many cases, by small dental teams sent to remote villages by the Indian Health Service. Since 2006, Dental Health Aide Therapists (DHATs) have been trained through a collaboration of the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium and the University of Washington School of Medicine's Physician's Assistant Program at facilities in Anchorage and Bethel, Alaska.
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