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Danish Citizens' Expectations to the Use of eHealth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281786
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;208:78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Pernille Bertelsen
Kristina Tornbjerg
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;208:78-82
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Public Opinion
Telecommunications - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
Danish citizens' attitudes and expectations to eHealth is being investigated in this paper with the aim is to explore how the Danish citizens perceive eHealth. Data has been collected through a national survey with 1.058 respondents (80% participated by e-mail, 20% by telephone). We found that the majority of the Danish citizens had experience with use of eHealth and a positive view on eHealths impact on future healthcare. However, the citizens neither using nor trusting eHealth, belong to the socio-economic weak population with no or very little education suggesting a need for the designers and planners to revisit their patient empowerment strategies.
PubMed ID
25676951 View in PubMed
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Is HEADS in our heads? Health risk behavior is not routinely discussed with young people with chronic conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282598
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2016 Nov 01;28(4):429-435
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-01-2016
Author
Kirsten A Boisen
Pernille Grarup Hertz
Charlotte Blix
Grete Teilmann
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2016 Nov 01;28(4):429-435
Date
Nov-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Professional-Patient Relations
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics.
We conducted a questionnaire survey among young patients and health care professionals at a tertiary university hospital. Young patients reported on their cumulative experience and staff reported on their usual practice.
A total of 290 young patients aged 12-22 years (78% having a chronic condition) and 97 health care professionals participated. We found only small reported differences between staff and young patients regarding whether home, education, and activity were addressed. However, staff reported twice the rate of addressing smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception compared to young patients. Young patients reported that smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were addressed significantly more at adult clinics in comparison to pediatric clinics. After controlling for age, gender and duration of illness, according to young patients, adjusted odds ratios for addressing smoking at adult vs. pediatric clinics was 2.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26-4.83), alcohol 2.84 (95% CI:1.45-5.57), illegal drugs 4.20 (95% CI:1.69-10.44), sexuality 3.54 (95% CI: 1.67-7.50), contraception 3.68 (95% CI:1.61-8.41), and any of the above 2.95 (95% CI: 1.47-5.91).
According to young patients, smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were not routinely addressed at a tertiary hospital, and especially at paediatric clinics, these issues were seldom addressed.
PubMed ID
26360488 View in PubMed
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Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among older people: a prospective two-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290462
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Susanne Iwarsson
Markku Kauppinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
a Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences , University of Jyväskylä , Jyväskylä , Finland.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim was to study whether perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility affect changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among community-dwelling older people over a two-year period.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years (n = 848) in central Finland were interviewed on two occasions, face-to-face at baseline and over the telephone two years later. Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility were assessed using a 15-item structured questionnaire, and the sum scores categorized into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Autonomy in participation outdoors was assessed with the 'Impact on Participation and Autonomy' (IPA) questionnaire using the autonomy outdoors subscale (score range 0-20, higher scores indicating more restricted autonomy).
Scores for autonomy in participation outdoors were available for 848 participants at baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 3.8) and for 748 participants at the two-year follow-up (mean 6.7, SD = 3.9). At baseline, those reporting multiple environmental barriers had the most restricted autonomy, while those reporting no environmental barriers had the least restricted autonomy (p
PubMed ID
26979293 View in PubMed
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