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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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[Agn├Ęs Gaudreault. An integrated network in which the nurse is the first person to greet the patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122475
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 Jul-Aug;9(4):20
Publication Type
Article

Analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the network form of organization of traumatic brain injury service delivery systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131085
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(12):1188-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marie-Eve Lamontagne
Bonnie R Swaine
André Lavoie
Emmanuelle Careau
Author Affiliation
École de réadaptation, Université de Montréal, Canada.
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(12):1188-97
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
Abstract
Networks are an increasingly popular way to deal with the lack of integration of traumatic brain injury (TBI) care. Knowledge of the stakes of the network form of organization is critical in deciding whether or not to implement a TBI network to improve the continuity of TBI care.
To report the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of a TBI network and to consider these elements in a discussion about whether networks are a suitable solution to fragmented TBI care.
In-depth interviews with 12 representatives of network organization members. Interviews were qualitatively analyzed using the EGIPSS model of performance.
The majority of elements reported were related to the network's adaptation to its environment and more precisely to its capacity to acquire resources. The issue of value maintenance also received considerable attention from participants.
The network form of organization seems particularly sensitive to environmental issues, such as resource acquisition and legitimacy. The authors suggest that the network form of organization is a suitable way to increase the continuity of TBI care if the following criteria are met: (1) expectations toward network effectiveness to increase continuity of care are moderate and realistic; (2) sufficient resources are devoted to the design, implementation, and maintenance of the network; (3) a network's existence and actions are deemed legitimate by community and organization member partners; and (4) there is a good collaborative climate between the organizations.
PubMed ID
21939374 View in PubMed
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An intersectoral network for chronic disease prevention: the case of the Alberta healthy living network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148163
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2009;29(4):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
R. Geneau
B. Legowski
S. Stachenko
Author Affiliation
World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Chronic Non-Communicable Disease Policy, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. robert_geneau@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2009;29(4):153-61
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Health Priorities
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interinstitutional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Organizational Case Studies
Preventive Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Chronic Diseases (CDs) are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. CD experts have long promoted the use of integrated and intersectoral approaches to strengthen CD prevention efforts. This qualitative case study examined the perceived benefits and challenges associated with implementing an intersectoral network dedicated to CD prevention. Through interviewing key members of the Alberta Healthy Living Network (AHLN, or the Network), two overarching themes emerged from the data. The first relates to contrasting views on the role of the AHLN in relation to its actions and outcomes, especially concerning policy advocacy. The second focuses on the benefits and contributions of the AHLN and the challenge of demonstrating non-quantifiable outcomes. While the respondents agreed that the AHLN has contributed to intersectoral work in CD prevention in Alberta and to collaboration among Network members, several did not view this achievement as an end in itself and appealed to the Network to engage more in change-oriented activities. Managing contrasting expectations has had a significant impact on the functioning of the Network.
PubMed ID
19804679 View in PubMed
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The benefits of a palliative care network: a case study in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163165
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Apr;13(4):190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Diane Morin
Louise Saint-Laurent
Marie-Pier Bresse
Clemence Dallaire
Lise Fillion
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing Sciences, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada. diane.morin@fsi.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 Apr;13(4):190-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Networks - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Family - psychology
Health Facility Administrators - psychology
Health Services Accessibility
Home Care Services
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Medical Oncology - organization & administration
Medical Staff - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Oncology Nursing - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
This article aims to present the beneficial effects associated with the local implementation of an integrated network in palliative care, as perceived by diverse constituency groups. A case study was conducted in the province of Quebec, Canada, using individual (n=16) and group (n=16) interviews, with a total of 106 participants (i.e. managers and formal and informal caregivers). From a content analysis, two categories of beneficial effects emerged: those associated with professional practice and those with patient services. The most important effects of this organisational initiative were found to be the recognition of the palliative care domain necessitating specialized competencies, an improved interdisciplinary collaboration, and more efficient circulation of information between care settings, as well as improved accessibility, continuity and quality of care and services to patients at the end of life.
PubMed ID
17551423 View in PubMed
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The BRIDGE Community Consultation Project: building rural interprofessional discussions and group experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132570
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(3):1676
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Julie Drolet
Tracy Christianson
Natalie Clark
Author Affiliation
Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada. jdrolet@tru.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(3):1676
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community Networks - organization & administration
Education, Medical
Focus Groups
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Interprofessional (IP) community-oriented health education is an important strategy for achieving high quality health care. The purpose of this project was to develop collaborative partnerships between rural communities and Thompson Rivers University, Canada, to identify the needs and priorities for building capacity for IP placements in two rural communities in the Interior of BC.
The project developed and implemented a Community-Based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR) workshop for rural health practitioners to strengthen collaborative partnerships. Focused group discussions were used to explore the needs and priorities for inter-professional placements, and to better understand the nature of IP practice in each community. Documentation and relevant academic literature was reviewed on IP practice and education, rural practice, and field education.
The project identified the needs, priorities and challenges for IP placements, and successfully developed collaborative partnerships between rural communities and the university. Discussions revealed that allied health professionals were interested in facilitating IP placements but cited the lack of financial resources, accommodation in rural communities, and financial incentives for student transportation as concerns. The project revealed that rural health practitioners view IP placements as an avenue to address their recruitment and retention challenges.
Coordination of potential IP education opportunities proved to be more difficult than anticipated. Time was a factor, coordination of student timetables in social work, nursing and human service was challenging, and there was a lack of support and commitment from decision-makers and stakeholders at all levels.
PubMed ID
21806312 View in PubMed
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Building a pan-Canadian primary care sentinel surveillance network: initial development and moving forward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149799
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;22(4):412-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Richard Birtwhistle
Karim Keshavjee
Anita Lambert-Lanning
Marshall Godwin
Michelle Greiver
Donna Manca
Claudia Lagacé
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario Canada K7L 5N6. birtwhis@queensu.ca
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;22(4):412-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Databases as Topic
Family Practice
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Population Surveillance - methods
Primary Health Care
Program Development
Abstract
The development of a pan-Canadian network of primary care research networks for studying issues in primary care has been the vision of Canadian primary care researchers for many years. With the opportunity for funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada and the support of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, we have planned and developed a project to assess the feasibility of a network of networks of family medicine practices that exclusively use electronic medical records. The Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network will collect longitudinal data from practices across Canada to assess the primary care epidemiology and management of 5 chronic diseases: hypertension, diabetes, depression, chronic obstructive lung disease, and osteoarthritis. This article reports on the 7-month first phase of the feasibility project of 7 regional networks in Canada to develop a business plan, including governance, mission, and vision; develop memorandum of agreements with the regional networks and their respective universities; develop and obtain approval of research ethics board applications; develop methods for data extraction, a Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network database, and initial assessment of the types of data that can be extracted; and recruitment of 10 practices at each network that use electronic medical records. The project will continue in phase 2 of the feasibility testing until April 2010.
PubMed ID
19587256 View in PubMed
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Building Native Hawaiian capacity in cancer research and programming. A legacy of 'Imi Hale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167484
Source
Cancer. 2006 Oct 15;107(8 Suppl):2082-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2006
Author
Kathryn L Braun
Joann U Tsark
LorrieAnn Santos
Nia Aitaoto
Clayton Chong
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
Source
Cancer. 2006 Oct 15;107(8 Suppl):2082-90
Date
Oct-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Community Networks - organization & administration
Hawaii - ethnology
Health education
Humans
Neoplasms - ethnology
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Abstract
In 2000, cancer health indicators for Native Hawaiians were worse than those of other ethnic groups in Hawai'i, and Native Hawaiians were under-represented in research endeavors. To build capacity to reduce cancer health disparities, 'Imi Hale applied principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and empowerment theory. Strategies included: 1) engaging Native Hawaiians in defining cancer priorities; 2) developing culturally appropriate processes and products; 3) supplementing primary and secondary cancer prevention activities; 4) offering skills training and technical assistance; and 5) providing an infrastructure to support culturally appropriate research. Between 2000 and 2005, 'Imi Hale involved more than 8000 Native Hawaiians in education, training, and primary and secondary prevention activities; developed 24 culturally tailored educational products (brochures, curricula, and self-help kits); secured $1.1 million in additional program and research funds; trained 98 indigenous researchers, 79 of whom worked on research projects; and engaged more than 3000 other Native Hawaiians as research participants and advisors. Evidence of empowerment was seen in increased individual competence, enhanced community capacity and participation, reduced barriers, and improved supports to address cancer in Hawaiian communities. Operationalizing CBPR and empowerment requires a commitment to involving as many people as possible, addressing community priorities, following cultural protocol, developing and transferring skills, and supporting an infrastructure to reduce barriers and build supports to sustain change. This approach is time consuming, but necessary for building competence and capacity, especially in indigenous and minority communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.
PubMed ID
16977599 View in PubMed
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Source
Healthc Pap. 2006;7(2):37-9; discussion 68-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Marc Pelletier
Author Affiliation
Clinical Support and Strategic Planning, Fraser Health Authority, British Columbia.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2006;7(2):37-9; discussion 68-75
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Forecasting
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, organizational
Organizational Objectives
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Abstract
This brief commentary offers one reader's reactions to the ideas advanced by Huerta, Casebeer and VanderPlaat. I highlight the need for further elucidation of the construct, make suggestions to deal with some of identified paradoxes and build on the ideas for future development.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2006;7(2):10-2617167314
PubMed ID
17167317 View in PubMed
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134 records – page 1 of 14.