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4th annual telemedicine program review. Part 2: United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68966
Source
Telemed Today. 1997 Aug;5(4):30-8, 42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Rosen
Author Affiliation
Impact Video Communication, San Francisco, CA, USA. erosen@impactvid.com
Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Computer Communication Networks - instrumentation - trends
Dentistry
Home Care Services
Humans
Telemedicine - instrumentation - trends
Telephone - instrumentation - trends
Television - instrumentation
United States
PubMed ID
10181176 View in PubMed
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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
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Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144806
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Mélanie Levasseur
Johanne Desrosiers
Gale Whiteneck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12ième avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 5N4, Canada. Melanie.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Analysis of Variance
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Social Perception
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP.
A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age=73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components.
Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P=0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in "Physical environment and accessibility" (R2=0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in "Social support and attitudes" (R2=0.51).
With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions.
Notes
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Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2004 Jul;36(4):177-8215370734
PubMed ID
20237957 View in PubMed
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Adaptive comanagement for building resilience in social-ecological systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50613
Source
Environ Manage. 2004 Jul;34(1):75-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Per Olsson
Carl Folke
Fikret Berkes
Author Affiliation
Department of Systems Ecology and Centre for Transdisciplinary Environmental Research, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. potto@system.ecology.su.se
Source
Environ Manage. 2004 Jul;34(1):75-90
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecology
Ecosystem
Humans
Information Services
Knowledge
Organizational Culture
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Conditions
Sweden
Abstract
Ecosystems are complex adaptive systems that require flexible governance with the ability to respond to environmental feedback. We present, through examples from Sweden and Canada, the development of adaptive comanagement systems, showing how local groups self-organize, learn, and actively adapt to and shape change with social networks that connect institutions and organizations across levels and scales and that facilitate information flows. The development took place through a sequence of responses to environmental events that widened the scope of local management from a particular issue or resource to a broad set of issues related to ecosystem processes across scales and from individual actors, to group of actors to multiple-actor processes. The results suggest that the institutional and organizational landscapes should be approached as carefully as the ecological in order to clarify features that contribute to the resilience of social-ecological systems. These include the following: vision, leadership, and trust; enabling legislation that creates social space for ecosystem management; funds for responding to environmental change and for remedial action; capacity for monitoring and responding to environmental feedback; information flow through social networks; the combination of various sources of information and knowledge; and sense-making and arenas of collaborative learning for ecosystem management. We propose that the self-organizing process of adaptive comanagement development, facilitated by rules and incentives of higher levels, has the potential to expand desirable stability domains of a region and make social-ecological systems more robust to change.
PubMed ID
15383875 View in PubMed
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Adoption of security and confidentiality features in an operational community health information network: the Comox Valley experience--case example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204710
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1998 Mar;49(1):81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
J R Moehr
J G McDaniel
Author Affiliation
School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
Int J Med Inform. 1998 Mar;49(1):81-7
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Clinical Laboratory Information Systems
Community Networks
Computer Communication Networks
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Database Management Systems
Databases as Topic
Group Practice
Hospital Information Systems
Hospitals, General
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Abstract
Since 1993, a budding community health information network (CHIN) has been in operation in the Comox Valley in Canada. A general hospital and three multi-doctor clinics are linked electronically. The clinics operate without paper charts using a comprehensive clinic information system. The link is provided by RSALink, a commercial message exchange service, based on Health Link, a system developed at the University of Victoria (McDaniel et al., Can. Med. Inform. 1 (1994) 40-41; McDaniel, Dissertation, University of Victoria, Canada, 1994). Health Link is a highly adaptable message exchange service with rich functionality. Despite this, the system is used exclusively to receive laboratory results transmitted by the hospital's laboratory system (RSAStat). The results are deposited in the patient data base of a commercial clinic information system (CliniCare). This case is instructive because the users' selection of services available through Health Link allows us to observe the preferences in this informational sophisticated environment. Laboratory data transmission is appreciated as highly beneficial. The reliability, security and ample privacy protection and authentication features of Health Link, in contrast, are used in a black box mode and are not consciously exploited. This is consistent with our experience of the use of other systems which have operated for a substantial time, essentially without serious protection features. Our experience suggests that security and confidentiality features are exploited only to the extent that they do not require additional effort or conscientious intervention. This puts the system provider in the difficult position of either offering interactive systems that nobody will use, or providing automated features that nobody is aware of and that are therefore not used to full advantage--if at all.
PubMed ID
9723805 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Feb;22(2):157
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
John A M Morphet
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Feb;22(2):157
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Networks
Continuity of Patient Care
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Notes
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Nov 1;38(5):1587-811691551
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Jul;19(8):949; author reply 94912892096
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Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1998 Aug;14(8):9979738156
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jan;21(1):99; author reply 99-10015751167
Comment On: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Aug;21(10):833-816107904
PubMed ID
16532578 View in PubMed
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Advancement of the artificial pancreas through the development of interoperability standards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108263
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013 Jul;7(4):1066-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Peter E Picton
Melanie Yeung
Nathaniel Hamming
Lane Desborough
Eyal Dassau
Joseph A Cafazzo
Author Affiliation
Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. peter.picton@uhn.ca
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013 Jul;7(4):1066-70
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks
Computer Communication Networks - standards
Congresses as topic
Diabetes Mellitus - surgery
Endocrine Surgical Procedures - standards
Equipment Design - standards
Humans
Pancreas, Artificial - standards
Research
Systems Integration
Abstract
Despite advancements in the development of the artificial pancreas, barriers in the form of proprietary data and communication protocols of diabetes devices have made the integration of these components challenging. The Artificial Pancreas Standards and Technical Platform Project is an initiative funded by the JDRF Canadian Clinical Trial Network with the goal of developing device communication standards for the interoperability of diabetes devices. Stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and medical and patient communities have been engaged in advancing this effort. In this article, we describe this initiative along with the process involved in working with the standards organizations and stakeholders that are key to ensuring effective standards are developed and adopted. Discussion from a special session of the 12th Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting is also provided.
Notes
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Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(3):e7022564332
PubMed ID
23911190 View in PubMed
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441 records – page 1 of 45.