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108 records – page 1 of 11.

The association between income source and met need among community mental health service users in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129615
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2012 Oct;48(5):662-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Anna Durbin
Susan J Bondy
Janet Durbin
Author Affiliation
Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, 4th Floor, 155 College St., Toronto, ON, Canada. anna.durbin@gmail.com
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2012 Oct;48(5):662-72
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Data Collection
Female
Health Care Reform
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Assistance
Quality of Health Care
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined income source and match between recommended and received care among users of community mental health services. We conducted a secondary analysis of needs-based planning data on adults in Ontario community mental health programs from 2000 to 2002. The outcome was whether clients were severely underserved (yes/no) based on the match between level of care recommended and received. A logistic regression model investigated if income source predicted this outcome. 13% of clients were severely underserved. Over 40% were on public assistance and they had a higher risk of being severely undeserved than the others. Men were at greater risk. One aim of mental health reform is to increase access to care for vulnerable individuals. The finding that among users of community mental health services, individuals with public assistance income support are most vulnerable to being severely underserved should be considered by service planners and providers.
PubMed ID
22086184 View in PubMed
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The burden of conditions not attributable to mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210792
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1996 Nov;153(11):1489-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
C M Siddique
T D Aubry
D. Mulhall
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Division, Valley Health Services Association, Kentville, N.S., Canada.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1996 Nov;153(11):1489-91
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Social Problems - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to extend previous findings on the relationship of V code conditions to use of psychiatric services and treatment outcome.
The group under study involved 2,542 outpatients from three community mental health centers in Nova Scotia, Canada. From this group, three subgroups of patients were compared: 1) patients with V code conditions, 2) patients with DSM-III-R mental disorders, and 3) patients with both V code conditions and mental disorders.
The majority of patients (61.8%) were diagnosed with V code conditions, and a substantial minority (19.6%) had V code conditions as the sole diagnoses. Patients with V code conditions without mental disorders were similar to patients with mental disorders in consumption of treatment resources and treatment outcome.
Strategies for improving the efficiency of mental health services to patients with V code conditions need to be developed.
PubMed ID
8890688 View in PubMed
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[Clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of a contingent of patients from the geriatric psychiatry clinic of a territorial polyclinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237631
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1986;86(9):1352-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
S I Gavrilova
N M Mikhailova
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1986;86(9):1352-7
Date
1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Moscow
Sex Factors
Abstract
The authors have studied the syndromal, nosological, sex and age characteristics of the patients registered at the gerontopsychiatric room of a general somatic district polyclinic as compared with the same parameters in mental outpatients of late age. It has been demonstrated that a new organizational form of specialized help (gerontopsychiatric consultations at the primary level of health care) makes it possible to ascertain mental disturbances of a borderline nature in old people and to expand the provision of therapeutic and rehabilitative measures to people not registered at outpatient psychiatric institutions.
PubMed ID
3776419 View in PubMed
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Community-based facilities may be replacing hospitals for the treatment of alcoholism: the evidence from Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217051
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1994 Nov;20(4):529-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
M. Adrian
A C Ogborne
J G Rankin
B S Ferguson
P. Jull
Author Affiliation
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1994 Nov;20(4):529-45
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Cause of Death
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - utilization
Survival Rate
Abstract
We examined hospital utilization and use of community facilities for the treatment of alcohol problems in Ontario using Statistics Canada, Hospital Medical Records Institute records, and other administrative records. Between 1974 and 1986 there was a large drop in utilization of hospital services for treatment of alcohol problems. Rates of alcohol inpatient cases in general hospitals dropped by 47% and in mental hospitals by 33%. At the same time, there was an increase in overall availability of hospital beds and bed-days of care for all medical conditions, and no change in the total number of hospital discharges (1.3 million) and occupancy rates (80-85%). Also at the same time, the number of community-based programs for the treatment of alcohol problems increased, as did the number of persons or cases treated by them. This was associated with a drop of inpatient cases treated for alcohol problems in 38 out of 48 counties in Ontario (P
PubMed ID
7832184 View in PubMed
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Community mental health and ethnic minority populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6216
Source
Community Ment Health J. 1990 Jun;26(3):277-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
F K Cheung
L R Snowden
Author Affiliation
Minority Research Resources Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Berkeley, CA.
Source
Community Ment Health J. 1990 Jun;26(3):277-91
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Culture
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
National trends in minority utilization of mental health services are reviewed, and recommendations are made for needed research. In relation to their representation in the population, blacks use services more than expected, and Asian American/Pacific Islanders use services less; Hispanics and Native American/Alaska Islander use varies according to type of service. Hospitalization accounts for part of the increase in minority utilization; this trend is problematic. Disruptions in service continue to plaque minority clients, possibly stemming from inadequacies in the organization and financing of care, and from cultural incongruity. Much more must be learned about these problems in utilization, as well as about other key issues.
PubMed ID
2354624 View in PubMed
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Community mental health services' clients with child welfare status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218058
Source
Psychol Rep. 1994 Jun;74(3 Pt 1):960-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
A H Thompson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Psychol Rep. 1994 Jun;74(3 Pt 1):960-2
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Abstract
An examination of two samples of children seen one year apart at a community mental health service indicated that a significant proportion had also been involved with the child welfare system (44% of the 119-member older sample and 32% of the 160 individuals from the current sample). A reanalysis of the latter sample one year later showed that the caseload overlap had increased to 39%.
PubMed ID
8058886 View in PubMed
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Community placement of long-stay psychiatric patients in northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72223
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2000 Mar;51(3):383-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S. Räsänen
H. Hakko
A. Herva
M. Isohanni
P. Nieminen
J. Moring
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland. sjrarane@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2000 Mar;51(3):383-5
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Rapid deinstitutionalization occurred in Finland in the 1990s, a decade later than in many other Western countries. A four-year follow-up study in northern Finland examined community placements of 253 long-stay psychiatric inpatients after deinstitutionalization in 1992 and at follow-up at the end of 1995. About 70 percent of the patients were discharged. Only 15 percent were able to live outside the hospital without continuous support. No patient was homeless at follow-up. Being unmarried, living in the city of Oulu, and having greater severity of illness were associated with hospitalization at follow-up. The results showed that long-stay patients are dependent on considerable support. Alternative residential facilities have made deinstitutionalization possible.
PubMed ID
10686249 View in PubMed
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Community psychiatric services for the elderly: the Sunnybrook experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235580
Source
Can Ment Health. 1987 Mar;35(1):2-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1987
Author
M F Wargon
K I Shulman
Source
Can Ment Health. 1987 Mar;35(1):2-6
Date
Mar-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Data Collection
Hospitals
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Ontario
Patient care team
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
This paper describes the first three years of a community outreach service for psychogeriatric assessment and treatment, provided by a multidisciplinary team in an urban area. As one component of a comprehensive geriatric psychiatry service within a general hospital, this program provides a long-term link between patient, family, community agencies and hospital. The paper describes the functioning of the team, including its relationships with other hospital and community services. An overview is given of patient characteristics, referral sources, services provided, and outcomes at discharge from the program. Educational opportunities for students and staff in various health professions and settings are discussed.
PubMed ID
10281599 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community resources for psychiatric and psychosocial problems. Family physicians' referral patterns in urban Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214666
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Aug;41:1325-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
M A Craven
C J Allen
N. Kates
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Aug;41:1325-35
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Practice - education - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Resources - utilization
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
To document the number and pattern of psychiatric and psychosocial referrals to community resources by family physicians (FPs) and to determine whether referral practices correlate with physician variables.
Cross-sectional survey of referrals by FPs to 34 key psychiatric and psychosocial community resources identified by a panel of FPs, psychiatric social workers, psychiatric nurses, public health nurses, and the local community information service.
Regional municipality of 434,000 persons in Ontario.
Twenty-seven of 34 (79%) community agencies identified 261 FPs who made 4487 referrals to participating agencies (range 0 to 65, median 15, mean 17.19 +/- 13.42).
Number of referrals to all agencies; variables, such as physician sex, school of graduation, year of graduation, and certificate status in the College of Family Physicians of Canada, related to referral patterns.
Referrals to outpatient psychiatric clinics, support services, and general counseling services accounted for 96% of all referrals. Physicians' average annual referral profile was as follows: 8.6 patients to a support service, 6.3 to an outpatient psychiatric service, 1.6 to a counseling service, and 0.46 to a substance abuse service. Referral profiles of individual physicians varied greatly. Female FPs made fewer referrals than male FPs to support services, but both made similar numbers of referrals to psychiatric, counseling, and substance abuse services. The more recent the year of graduation, the greater the number of referrals to psychiatric (r = 0.158, P = 0.0107) and counseling services (r = 0.137, P = 0.0272) and the higher the fraction of referrals to psychiatric services (r = 0.286, P = 0.0001).
Family physicians in Hamilton-Wentworth made few referrals to psychiatric and psychosocial services. Only physician sex and year of graduation correlated significantly with numbers of referrals made. Recent graduates of both sexes made significantly more referrals to psychiatric clinics and counseling services than their older colleagues.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7580381 View in PubMed
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A comparison of health service use in two jurisdictions with and without compulsory community treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172842
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1357-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Stephen Kisely
Mark Smith
Neil J Preston
Jianguo Xiao
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University and Health Outcomes Unit, Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Canada.
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Sep;35(9):1357-67
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Female
Health Policy
Hospitals, Psychiatric - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Western Australia
Abstract
This study examines whether community treatment orders (CTOs) reduce psychiatric admission rates or bed-days for patients from Western Australia compared to control patients from a jurisdiction without this legislation (Nova Scotia).
A population-based record linkage analysis of an inception cohort using a two-stage design of matching and multivariate analyses to control for sociodemographics, clinical features and psychiatric history. All discharges from in-patient psychiatric services in Western Australia and Nova Scotia were included covering a population of 2.6 million people. Patients on CTOs in the first year of implementation in Western Australia were compared with controls from Nova Scotia matched on date of discharge from in-patient care, demographics, diagnosis and past in-patient psychiatric history. We analysed time to admission using Cox regression analyses and number of bed-days using logistic regression.
We matched 196 CTO cases with an equal number of controls. On survival analyses, CTO cases had a significantly greater readmission rate. Co-morbid personality disorder and previous psychiatric history were also associated with readmission. However, on logistic regression, patients on CTOs spent less time in hospital in the following year, with reduced in-patient stays of over 100 days.
Although compulsory community treatment does not reduce hospital admission rates, increased surveillance of patients on CTOs may lead to earlier intervention such as admission, so reducing length of hospital stay. However, we do not know if it is the intensity of treatment, or its compulsory nature, that effects outcome.
PubMed ID
16168158 View in PubMed
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108 records – page 1 of 11.