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258 records – page 1 of 26.

[A community short-term crisis unit does not reduce acute admissions to psychiatric wards]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95020
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Oct 8;129(19):1973-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-2009
Author
Bergerud Tone
Møller Paul
Larsen Frode
Veenstra Marijke
Ruud Torleif
Author Affiliation
Allmennpsykiatrisk døgnseksjon, Psykiatrisk Senter Asker, Sykehuset Asker og Baerum, Postboks 83, 1309 Rud, Norway. tone.bergerud@sabhf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Oct 8;129(19):1973-6
Date
Oct-8-2009
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Centers
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Crisis Intervention - organization & administration
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Due to long-term capacity problems in the psychiatric acute ward, we tried to canalise acute admissions due to life crises (and not serious mental disease) to a new short-term in-patient crisis unit. Our hypothesis was that the opening of this unit would lead to fewer admissions to the psychiatric acute ward and that this change would be reflected by an increase of patients with a more severe psychopathology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study had a quasi-experimental design. Two patient groups in a psychiatric acute ward (from separate catchment areas) were compared before (2.1.2003-1.6.2003) and after (2.1.2004-1.6.2004) establishment of a community based short-term inpatient crisis unit in one of the catchment areas. RESULTS: 234 patients were included in the study. Admissions to the psychiatric acute ward did not decline from any of the catchment areas from the first to the second time-period . The second time-period was associated with less psychopathology, but only for men in the area with a crisis unit. The reduction was largest for self-harm and suicidal behaviour (p = 0.02) and depression (p = 0.01). INTERPRETATION: None of our hypotheses were confirmed. Our main conclusion is that patient flow in acute mental health services involves a multitude of complex and unpredictable factors. The services continuously reorganise. Different ways of organising mental health services are rarely studied systematically, and such studies are difficult and resource demanding.
PubMed ID
19823199 View in PubMed
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Addressing the needs of women living with Schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191312
Source
Can Nurse. 2001 Oct;97(9):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001

[A good new future!. Interview by Bjørn Arild Ostby].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228846
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Jun 26;78(11):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-1990

Alaska Youth Initiative: the dream, the reality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35242
Source
J Ment Health Adm. 1995;22(3):293-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B A Minton
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau 99801, USA.
Source
J Ment Health Adm. 1995;22(3):293-300
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Child Guidance Clinics - organization & administration
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice training
Organizational Objectives
Patient Care Planning
Power (Psychology)
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Many states have been interested in revising their systems of care for young people. The Alaska Youth Initiative (AYI) attempted to improve the system of care by providing community-based, individualized services to youths who would otherwise be institutionalized outside the state. Major policy changes included emphasis on local service provision, individualized services, unconditional care, and coordination of services. The AYI's performance on its original goals is mixed. Complications in implementation arose from lack of provider training, conflict over coordination at the state level, and difficulty in individualizing programs. Although significant successes have occurred, administrators could improve the implementation of similar types of programs by making specific plans to address concerns of various stakeholders, providing fiscal incentives for cooperation for state workers, and providing ongoing training in both clinical and administrative areas.
PubMed ID
10144464 View in PubMed
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An agency model for developing and coordinating psychiatric aftercare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245350
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
S J Freeman
L. Fischer
A. Sheldon
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare - organization & administration - standards
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Deinstitutionalization
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Ontario
Patient Advocacy
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
The development of coordinated systems for delivery of aftercare services to psychiatric patients has lagged far behind the theoretical emphasis on community maintenance. From a collaboration of 29 treatment and rehabilitation facilities, an independent agency was established to improve aftercare services in Metropolitan Toronto. Known as Community Resources Consultants, the agency was designed to facilitate and rationalize the use of existing services, to identify gaps in service, to initiate or cooperate in the development of new services, and to involve hospital and community service personnel in raising the level of expertise in the provision of aftercare. Formal and informal assessments indicate that CRC has had a positive effect on the provision of aftercare services and on professionals' level of awareness of aftercare priorities.
PubMed ID
6253385 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the activities of psychoneurological dispensaries rendering the services to patients with borderline conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231721
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1989;89(11):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
G M Rumiantseva
A A Churkin
A M Basov
S F Egorov
A V Grushkov
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1989;89(11):87-92
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Centers - organization & administration
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - rehabilitation - therapy
Moscow
Abstract
As many as 1,851 disease histories of patients belonging to the group of mental disorders of non-psychotic level (code MKB-9 300-317) were analyzed within the framework of the organizational experiment with a purpose of reorganizing the dispensary assistance. The data obtained indicate that the diagnosis and the treatment recommendations are not based enough in all the cases, with social restricting measures dominating over social and protective ones. For such a group of patients, the dispensary follow up is not justified. That is why the available dispensary services require changes in the principles and concrete patterns of their functioning.
PubMed ID
2624058 View in PubMed
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An answer to the problem of district psychiatric care in an urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251746
Source
Can Ment Health. 1975 Dec;23(4):3-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1975

An indigenous community mental health service on the Tohono O'odham (Papago) Indian Reservation: seventeen years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232938
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 1988 Jun;16(3):369-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
M W Kahn
L. Lejero
M. Antone
D. Francisco
J. Manuel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721.
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 1988 Jun;16(3):369-79
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - rehabilitation
Arizona
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - prevention & control
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Health Resources
Humans
Incest
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Substance-Related Disorders - rehabilitation
Suicide - prevention & control
Abstract
The status of a fully indigenous mental health program serviced and controlled by the Tohono O'odham (Papago) Indian tribe is reviewed from the perspective of its 17-year history. The program functions in large measure in a crisis intervention model, with suicidal or acutely disturbed cases being most frequent. However, a whole range of disorders and ages are seen. Traditional Medicine Men and Women are often used as consultants, as are some professionals. In recent years child sex abuse and abuse of drugs among youth are prominent problems. The program experienced problems of obtaining services off reservations for patients in need, and in establishing credibility of the Indian Mental Health workers with the outside service providers.
PubMed ID
3421212 View in PubMed
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An indigenous mental health program in remote Northwestern Ontario: development and training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241662
Source
Can Ment Health. 1983 Sep;31(3):2, 10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983
Author
J. Timpson
Source
Can Ment Health. 1983 Sep;31(3):2, 10
Date
Sep-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Counseling - education
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Hospital Bed Capacity, under 100
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Ontario
Abstract
This paper describes a shift in the focus of mental health services to remote Indian villages in Northwestern Ontario. Traditional indigenous counsellors are assuming control of this service, previously offered by non-Indian outsiders. The resources of the Federal Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital and psychiatrists from the University of Toronto are used in the ongoing training of the counsellors. Challenges encountered by outside non-Indian professionals providing relevant training and consultation to the area's natural helpers are described. This unique program has enjoyed enthusiastic acceptance by local people in helping positions.
PubMed ID
10262663 View in PubMed
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An integrated cooperation model for long-term mentally ill in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7873
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1995 Aug;33(8):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
E. Danielson
Author Affiliation
Ostersund College of Health and Caring Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1995 Aug;33(8):29-35
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care
Home Care Services
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
Nurses' Aides
Patient care team
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Social Work
Sweden
Abstract
1. This article describes a Swedish model of community support for patients with a long-term mental illness. 2. The result confirms that the staff-psychiatric practical nurses and aids are important in the care with support and coping as essential elements. 3. The staff members do require supervision from a nurse with knowledge about society and psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
7473311 View in PubMed
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258 records – page 1 of 26.