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25 records – page 1 of 3.

Challenges for health promotion in the 1990s: social inequities, empowerment, negative consequences, and the common good.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217986
Source
Am J Health Promot. 1994 Jul-Aug;8(6):403-13
Publication Type
Article

Citizen perspectives on the future of healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123542
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):40-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lynn M Nagle
Barbara M Pitts
Author Affiliation
Healthcare Advisory, Consulting and Deals, Pricewaterhouse-Coopers LLP, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):40-5
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Community Health Services - trends
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Humans
Ontario
Public Opinion
Abstract
The Citizen's Reference Panel was created to engage the people of Ontario in a dialogue about the directions for the future sustainability of healthcare. The primary concerns raised during the course of the panellists' deliberations included the need to (1) create a much closer integration of the health system's many providers and institutions, (2) accelerate the deployment of e-health solutions across the health system and (3) continue to focus on improving access to care, especially primary care and expanded community care services to reduce the pressure on institutional care.
PubMed ID
22688204 View in PubMed
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Community empowerment: the need for political analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231166
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Mar-Apr;80(2):87-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Labonté
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Mar-Apr;80(2):87-91
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - trends
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Self Care
Social Control, Formal
PubMed ID
2720545 View in PubMed
Less detail

The concept of equity in health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212480
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Mar;24(1):2-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
A. Krasnik
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Mar;24(1):2-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - trends
Denmark
Forecasting
Health Care Rationing - trends
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Health services research - trends
Humans
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Abstract
A population approach and the general right to health and medical care have been important issues in the development of health policy over many centuries. However, equity is still a crucial issue in the planning and evaluation of health care. Many definitions and criteria related to equity have been formulated on the basis of conflicting theories and models. Three dimensions of fair and just resource allocation are essential when needs-based models are used: equity in access, utilization, and quality of care relative to needs. Health services research should concentrate on such outcome measures regarding equity and the effect of organizational and processual characteristics of health care systems. Prominent examples of such research efforts are presented, but, unfortunately, there are few reliable and systematic data from this kind of study. Health care researchers have a special responsibility towards the population at large to undertake qualified research on equity and to communicate the results to the general public.
PubMed ID
8740870 View in PubMed
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Continuity and utilization of health and community care in elderly patients with heart failure before and after hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299628
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 08 13; 18(1):177
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-13-2018
Author
Emma Säfström
Tiny Jaarsma
Anna Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Sörmland County Council, Nyköping Hospital, Nyköping, Sweden. emma.safstrom@liu.se.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 08 13; 18(1):177
Date
08-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Health Services - trends
Continuity of Patient Care - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - trends
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - therapy
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Discharge - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The period after hospitalization due to deteriorated heart failure (HF) is characterized as a time of high generalized risk. The transition from hospital to home is often problematic due to insufficient coordination of care, leading to a fragmentation of care rather than a seamless continuum of care. The aim was to describe health and community care utilization prior to and 30 days after hospitalization, and the continuity of care in patients hospitalized due to de novo or deteriorated HF from the patients' perspective and from a medical chart review.
This was a cross-sectional study with consecutive inclusion of patients hospitalized at a county hospital in Sweden due to deteriorated HF during 2014. Data were collected by structured telephone interviews and medical chart review and analyzed with the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and Chi square. A P value of 0.05 was considered significant.
A total of 121 patients were included in the study, mean age 82.5 (±6.8) and 49% were women. Half of the patients had not visited any health care facility during the month prior to the index hospital admission, and 79% of the patients visited the emergency room (ER) without a referral. Among these elderly patients, a total of 40% received assistance at home prior to hospitalization and 52% after discharge. A total of 86% received written discharge information, one third felt insecure after hospitalization and lacked knowledge of which health care provider to consult with and contact in the event of deterioration or complications. Health care utilization increased significantly after hospitalization.
Most patients had not visited any health care facility within 30 days before hospitalization. Health care utilization increased significantly after hospitalization. Flaws in the continuity of care were found; even though most patients received written information at discharge, one third of the patients lacked knowledge about which health care provider to contact in the event of deterioration and felt insecure at home after discharge.
PubMed ID
30103688 View in PubMed
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Developing healthy communities. A five year project report from The Community Health Development Centre. Presented at The International Healthy Cities Conference. September 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232216
Source
Can J Public Health. 1988 Nov-Dec;79(6):416-9
Publication Type
Article

Donwood looks at lifestyle alternatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243228
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1982 May;59(5):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1982

The environment of medicine in the 21st century: implications for preventive and community approaches.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235433
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Mar 15;136(6):571-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1987
Author
F. White
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Mar 15;136(6):571-5
Date
Mar-15-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - trends
Delivery of Health Care
Forecasting
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Physician's Role
Preventive Medicine - trends
Primary Prevention - trends
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1980 Nov-Dec;71(6):371-807225978
Cites: Dimens Health Serv. 1984 May;61(5):21-36734975
Cites: Dimens Health Serv. 1986 Sep;63(6):17-203758521
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1985 Mar;14(1):9-213988446
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1985 Jan-Feb;76(1):8-123978532
PubMed ID
3815226 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.