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49 records – page 1 of 5.

[Accreditation visit. An enriching experience].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235217
Source
Nurs Que. 1987 May-Jun;7(3):59
Publication Type
Article

Adapting national and international leg ulcer practice guidelines for local use: the Ontario Leg Ulcer Community Care Protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173361
Source
Adv Skin Wound Care. 2005 Jul-Aug;18(6):307-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ian D Graham
Margaret B Harrison
Karen Lorimer
Tadeusz Piercianowski
Elaine Friedberg
Maureen Buchanan
Connie Harris
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, and Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Adv Skin Wound Care. 2005 Jul-Aug;18(6):307-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
International Cooperation
Leg Ulcer - diagnosis - therapy
National Health Programs - standards
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Because of growing resources devoted to individuals requiring community care for leg ulcers, the authority responsible for home care in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, established and evaluated a demonstration leg ulcer service. In an effort to provide current and evidence-based care, existing leg ulcer clinical practice guidelines were identified and appraised for quality and suitability to the new service.
The Practice Guideline Evaluation and Adaptation Cycle guided development of a local protocol for leg ulcer care, which included: (1) systematically searching for practice guidelines, (2) appraising the quality of identified guidelines using a validated guideline appraisal instrument, (3) conducting a content analysis of guideline recommendations, (4) selecting recommendations to include in the local protocol, and (5) obtaining practitioner and external expert feedback on the proposed protocol. Updating the protocol followed a similar process.
Of 19 identified leg ulcer practice guidelines, 14 were not evaluated because they did not meet the criteria (ie, treatment-focused guidelines, written in English and developed after 1998). Of the 5 remaining guidelines, 3 were fairly well developed and made similar recommendations. The level of evidence supporting specific recommendations ranged from randomized clinical trial evidence to expert opinion. By comparing the methodologic quality and content of the guidelines, the Task Force reached consensus regarding recommendations appropriate for local application. Two additional guidelines were subsequently identified and incorporated into the local protocol during a scheduled update.
Local adaptation of international and national guidelines is feasible following facilitation of the Practice Guidelines Evaluation and Adaptation Cycle.
PubMed ID
16096396 View in PubMed
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An approach to the development of practice guidelines for community health interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217816
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S8-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
T W Gyorkos
T N Tannenbaum
M. Abrahamowicz
A D Oxman
E A Scott
M E Millson
I. Rasooly
J W Frank
P D Riben
R G Mathias
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S8-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - standards
Data Collection - methods
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Research Design - standards
Abstract
The Community Health Practice Guidelines (CHPG) project was initiated to develop a systematic approach to the critical evaluation of evidence on the effectiveness and efficiency of community health interventions and to the formulation of evidence-based practice recommendations. Three community health interventions--immunization delivery methods, partner notification for sexually transmitted diseases and the combination of restaurant inspection and education of food handlers--were used as prototypes to develop a standardized approach. The CHPG process consists of three components: a review of scientific evidence, a practice survey and formulation of practice guidelines. Imperatives for further development of the CHPG and define research priorities process include creating a coalition of public health organizations to sponsor the process and refining the consensus process so that the practice guidelines accurately reflect both the scientific basis of public health practice and the values of those affected.
PubMed ID
7987764 View in PubMed
Less detail

An investigation into the quality of service provided by telephone hotlines for family planning services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243204
Source
Can J Public Health. 1982 May-Jun;73(3):194-9
Publication Type
Article

An obstetric and gynecologic clerkship's influence on a medical community. The Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho Anchorage obstetric and gynecologic clerkship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4545
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Jun;176(6):1363-5; discussion 1366-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
H B Hanson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington Medical School, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Jun;176(6):1363-5; discussion 1366-7
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Clerkship
Communication
Community Health Services - standards
Consultants
Education, Medical - standards
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Idaho
Montana
Obstetrics - education
Perception
Pregnancy
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - standards
Washington
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Our purpose was to explore the influences of an obstetric and gynecologic medical student clerkship on a remote medical community. Return of physicians to Alaska and faculty perceptions of their experience were central foci. STUDY DESIGN: Data were obtained on former clerks to determine choice of specialty and location of practice. Data regarding all physicians new to Alaska was correlated with the University of Washington Medical School graduate data. Additionally, a questionnaire with a Likert-type scale evaluated the 10 clinical faculty members participating in the clerkship. RESULTS: Between 1978 and 1991 we trained 266 clerks. A total of 77 of 374 (21%) new physicians in Alaska (1978 to 1991) were graduates of the University of Washington; 26 of those 77 (34%) were our former Anchorage obstetrics and gynecology clerks. The clinical faculty reported both positive and negative effects of their participation in the clerkship. CONCLUSION: The desired benefit, the return of new physicians to Alaska, seemed supported. Questionnaire results hinted at additional benefits for the supervising faculty physicians in this isolated community. The formal affiliation effected by the clerkship seemed to have a positive impact on patient care, communication, consultation, and shared action among the participating physicians.
PubMed ID
9215198 View in PubMed
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Boundaries of the "healthcare workplace" must be expanded.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163765
Source
Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:104-7; discussion 109-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Thomas F Ward
Source
Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:104-7; discussion 109-19
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - standards
Health Personnel
Health Policy - trends
Health promotion
Home Care Services - standards
Humans
Occupational Health
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Policy
Quality of Health Care
Workplace - classification - standards
Abstract
There is merit in considering the lead papers within a context of the current social and political landscape, the status of our healthcare system and the role of public policy to drive change. In doing so, it becomes clear that the notion of workplace must extend beyond what has been traditionally confined to physician offices and healthcare facilities, and the traditional workforces within. Until the concept of health workforce include patients, unpaid care providers and new healthcare roles, and the concept of workplace includes communities and homes, we miss the identification of problems and the possible solutions to them.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:26-3417478997
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:6-2517478996
PubMed ID
17479010 View in PubMed
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[Call for increased effort. Increased expectation pressure]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36096
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Oct 5;81(16):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-1993

[Care of the aged--medically accountable nurses should clean up in community care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206113
Source
Vardfacket. 1998 Jan 12;22(1):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1998

[Community and institutional help: a spectrum for new parents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227149
Source
Nurs Que. 1991 Jan-Feb;11(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article

Developing competency-assessment tools to measure the family physician's ability to respond to the needs of the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192952
Source
Acad Med. 2001 Oct;76(10 Suppl):S80-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
I F Oandasan
N. Byrne
D. Davis
M S Shafir
R. Malik
I. Waters
B. Stubbs
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University Health Network, TOronto Western Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Acad Med. 2001 Oct;76(10 Suppl):S80-3
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Community Health Services - standards
Family Practice - standards
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
PubMed ID
11597881 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.