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The Circles of Care evaluation: doing participatory evaluation with American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178726
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):139-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
James Allen
Pamela B Deters
Author Affiliation
Tri Ethnic Center for Prevention Research, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):139-54
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Cultural Characteristics
Delivery of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Health Planning Support
Health Services Research - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, South American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Terminology as Topic
United States
Abstract
Little information exists regarding mental health and special needs related to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI-AN) families. In this paper we emphasize the use of oral tradition during the Circles of Care initiative, which was essential in understanding cultural history and historical trauma of AI-ANs while giving a greater understanding of an AI-AN-based definition of severe emotional disturbance (SED). The success of these methods serves as a template for improving systems of care and may be useful in evaluation among a wide range of ethnic communities.
PubMed ID
15322981 View in PubMed
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Community-based health care for indigenous women in Mexico: a qualitative evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105411
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2014;13(1):2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Blanca Pelcastre-Villafuerte
Myriam Ruiz
Sergio Meneses
Claudia Amaya
Margarita Márquez
Arianna Taboada
Katherine Careaga
Author Affiliation
Regional Center for Public Health Research, National Institute of Public Health, 19 Poniente Esquina 4ª Norte s/n, Colonia Centro, Tapachula, Chiapas C,P, 30700, Mexico. sergio.meneses@insp.mx.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2014;13(1):2
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Domestic Violence - prevention & control
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Mexico - ethnology
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Population Groups
Qualitative Research
Reproductive Health Services - organization & administration
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Indigenous women in Mexico represent a vulnerable population in which three kinds of discrimination converge (ethnicity, gender and class), having direct repercussions on health status. The discrimination and inequity in health care settings brought this population to the fore as a priority group for institutional action. The objective of this study was to evaluate the processes and performance of the "Casa de la Mujer Indígena", a community based project for culturally and linguistically appropriate service delivery for indigenous women. The evaluation summarizes perspectives from diverse stakeholders involved in the implementation of the model, including users, local authorities, and institutional representatives.
The study covered five Casas implementation sites located in four Mexican states. A qualitative process evaluation focused on systematically analyzing the Casas project processes and performance was conducted using archival information and semi-structured interviews. Sixty-two interviews were conducted, and grounded theory approach was applied for data analysis.
Few similarities were observed between the proposed model of service delivery and its implementation in diverse locations, signaling discordant operating processes. Evidence gathered from Casas personnel highlighted their ability to detect obstetric emergencies and domestic violence cases, as well as contribute to the empowerment of women in the indigenous communities served by the project. These themes directly translated to increases in the reporting of abuse and referrals for obstetric emergencies.
The model's cultural and linguistic competency, and contributions to increased referrals for obstetric emergencies and abuse are notable successes. The flexibility and community-based nature of the model has allowed it to be adapted to the particularities of diverse indigenous contexts. Local, culturally appropriate implementation has been facilitated by the fact that the Casas have been implemented with local leadership and local women have taken ownership. Users express overall satisfaction with service delivery, while providing constructive feedback for the improvement of existing Casas, as well as more cost-effective implementation of the model in new sites. Integration of user's input obtained from this process evaluation into future planning will undoubtedly increase buy-in. The Casas model is pertinent and viable to other contexts where indigenous women experience disparities in care.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2019-2816782493
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 1990 Jul-Aug;32(4):419-292263982
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 1990 Nov-Dec;32(6):673-842089644
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jul 2-8;366(9479):10-315993213
Cites: Cien Saude Colet. 2012 Mar;17(3):731-922450415
PubMed ID
24393517 View in PubMed
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Community capacity to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence: a survey of Ontario's HIV/AIDS sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134123
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michael G Wilson
Sean B Rourke
John N Lavis
Jean Bacon
Robb Travers
Author Affiliation
Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:54
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Data Collection
Evidence-Based Medicine - organization & administration - standards
HIV Infections - therapy
Humans
Ontario
Abstract
Community-based organizations (CBOs) are important stakeholders in health systems and are increasingly called upon to use research evidence to inform their advocacy, program planning, and service delivery. To better support CBOs to find and use research evidence, we sought to assess the capacity of CBOs in the HIV/AIDS sector to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence in their work.
We invited executive directors of HIV/AIDS CBOs in Ontario, Canada (n = 51) to complete the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's "Is Research Working for You?" survey.
Based on responses from 25 organizations that collectively provide services to approximately 32,000 clients per year with 290 full-time equivalent staff, we found organizational capacity to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence to be low. CBO strengths include supporting a culture that rewards flexibility and quality improvement, exchanging information within their organization, and ensuring that their decision-making processes have a place for research. However, CBO Executive Directors indicated that they lacked the skills, time, resources, incentives, and links with experts to acquire research, assess its quality and reliability, and summarize it in a user-friendly way.
Given the limited capacity to find and use research evidence, we recommend a capacity-building strategy for HIV/AIDS CBOs that focuses on providing the tools, resources, and skills needed to more consistently acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence. Such a strategy may be appropriate in other sectors and jurisdictions as well given that CBO Executive Directors in the HIV/AIDS sector in Ontario report low capacity despite being in the enviable position of having stable government infrastructure in place to support them, benefiting from long-standing investment in capacity building, and being part of an active provincial network. CBOs in other sectors and jurisdictions that have fewer supports may have comparable or lower capacity. Future research should examine a larger sample of CBO Executive Directors from a range of sectors and jurisdictions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21619682 View in PubMed
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The development of community health indicators: a district-wide approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135547
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2011 Mar;31(2):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
M W Russell
L A Campbell
S. Kisely
D. Persaud
Author Affiliation
Community Health, Capital Health, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Mary.russell@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2011 Mar;31(2):65-70
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Cooperative Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Priorities
Humans
Nova Scotia
Preventive Health Services - methods - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Abstract
In response to high rates of chronic disease, the Capital District Health Authority in Nova Scotia recognized a need to move from a focus on acute care in decision making to one that also values a population health approach guided by community health indicators.
Stakeholders were surveyed on the choice, knowledge and utility of selected indicators.
Respondents reported high scores for changes in their knowledge and attitude regarding community health indicators, and identified priority indicators for action.Decision makers' use of community health indicators was increased by stakeholder involvement, supporting evidence in plain language, and wide dissemination.
PubMed ID
21466756 View in PubMed
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Development of strategies for evaluating a community intervention programme for cancer prevention through dietary change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25749
Source
Community Med. 1988 Nov;10(4):289-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988

Elderly patients' participation in emergency medical services when offered an alternative care pathway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115984
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013;8:20014
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Veronica Vicente
Maaret Castren
Fredrik Sjöstrand
Birgitta Wireklint Sundström
Author Affiliation
Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013;8:20014
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Choice Behavior
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration - standards
Female
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
As organizational changes in the healthcare system are in progress, to enhance care quality and reduce costs, it is important to investigate how these changes affect elderly patients' experiences and their rights to participate in the choice of healthcare. The aim of this study is to describe elderly patients' lived experience of participating in the choice of healthcare when being offered an alternative care pathway by the emergency medical services, when the individual patient's medical needs made this choice possible. This study was carried out from the perspective of caring science, and a phenomenological approach was applied, where data were analysed for meaning. Data consist of 11 semi-structured interviews with elderly patients who chose a healthcare pathway to a community-based hospital when they were offered an alternative level of healthcare. The findings show that the essence of the phenomenon is described as "There was a ray of hope about a caring encounter and about being treated like a unique human being". Five meaningful constituents emerged in the descriptions: endurable waiting, speedy transference, a concerned encounter, trust in competence, and a choice based on memories of suffering from care. The conclusion is that patient participation in the choice of a healthcare alternative instead of the emergency department is an opportunity of avoiding suffering from care and being objectified.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23445898 View in PubMed
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Evaluating the Fabreville Heart Health Program in Laval, Canada: a dialogue between two paradigms, positivism and constructivism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185380
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Jun;18(2):127-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Minh Nguyet Nguyen
Joanne Otis
Author Affiliation
Public Health Department of Laval, Quebec, Canada. nguyet_nguyen@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Jun;18(2):127-34
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Consumer Participation
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Care Coalitions
Health Education - organization & administration - standards
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Primary prevention - methods
Program Evaluation - methods
Quebec
Abstract
As part of the Canadian Federal-Provincial Initiative in Heart Health, the goal of the Fabreville Heart Health Program was to sensitize a district of Laval, Quebec's second most populous city, to heart-healthy behaviours. The program was planned and implemented by a committee composed of Fabreville community leaders and professionals from the Public Health Department. Between 1992 and 1994, intervention objectives were defined by the department in terms of changing individual behaviours associated with cardiovascular risk factors, namely diet, sedentariness and smoking, as well as adapting physical and social environments to facilitate these changes. However, from 1994 to its conclusion in 1997, the program was re-oriented to engage the population in mobilizing their own community and taking charge of interventions themselves. Actions then became dependent on the interests and motivation of Fabreville residents to transform their lifestyles and aspects of their physical environment. The initial evaluation process, based on the positivist paradigm, was designed to measure changes in individual behaviours and certain physical environments, such as an increase in designated non-smoking areas. However, following the re-orientation towards community mobilization, it was decided that evaluation should go beyond the professional production of data to include a process of the collective construction of knowledge. Evaluation methodology then became based on the constructivist paradigm. Yet field constraints such as lack of community involvement in both leadership and process evaluation, and the need to ensure evaluation standards and fulfil sponsor obligations, compelled the Public Health Department to return to using a certain number of positivist methods. The ensuing inter-paradigm dialogue helped broaden the scope of evaluation and contributed to gaining a more in-depth understanding of the processes and outcomes of community mobilization.
PubMed ID
12746384 View in PubMed
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The experience of clients and informal caregivers with community health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202024
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1998;11(4):33-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
G. Greaves
P. Lewis
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1998;11(4):33-9
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Caregivers
Communication
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Disabled Persons
Focus Groups
Frail Elderly
Health Care Reform
Health Services Research
Home Care Services - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Abstract
Persistent changes in long term care policy reform in Ontario prompted one home care program to undertake a multifaceted study to evaluate the effects of those changes. This article describes the qualitative component of the study examining perceptions of clients (persons with disabilities; adults over 80 and under 80 years of age) and of informal caregivers concerning their satisfaction with services and the impact of service delivery on their quality of life. Responses and descriptions of relevant perceptions and experiences varied with category of participant. Study findings revealed that satisfaction with services and concomitant quality of life depended upon the quality of communication with service providers.
PubMed ID
10339204 View in PubMed
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Experiences from an allergy prevention programme in schoolchildren in a Swedish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191698
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Dec;19(4):261-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
A. Hannerz
Author Affiliation
Health Centre of Rosenlund, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Dec;19(4):261-2
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate an allergy prevention programme in a community.
Allergy prevention programme initiated by a special community allergy prevention committee and evaluation of this programme by means of a questionnaire to schoolchildren on repeated occasions during the period 1980 to 1998.
The community of Habo in Sweden with about 9500 inhabitants.
Prevalence of allergy manifestations according to the questionnaire.
In contrast to what is mostly reported, the prevalence of allergic manifestations seemed to decrease in the community of Habo during the observation period.
The results indicate a benefit from an intensified allergy prevention programme on the local level, but additional observations from other communities are needed in order to draw safe conclusions about the effect of allergy prevention programmes.
PubMed ID
11822652 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.