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[1,4 billions crowns to 1 881 projects renew rehabilitation and habilitation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202185
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1823
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-1999
Author
G. Wallgrund
G. Grimby
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1823
Date
Apr-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - economics - trends
Humans
Rehabilitation - economics - methods - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
10319646 View in PubMed
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[Can the costs of future needs of health and social services for the elderly be calculated?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192915
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Sep 19;98(38):4042-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-2001
Author
A. Wimo
L. Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, enheten för allmänmedicin, Umeå universitet. anders.wimo@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Sep 19;98(38):4042-8
Date
Sep-19-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Health Services - economics - trends
Cost of Illness
Costs and Cost Analysis
Dementia - economics - nursing
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Nursing - economics - trends
Geriatric Psychiatry - economics - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics - trends
Health Services for the Aged - economics - trends
Home Care Services - economics - trends
Home Nursing - economics - trends
Humans
Social Work - economics - trends
Sweden
Abstract
As a consequence of the increasing number of elderly people, the proportion of people of working age (20-65) vs. the oldest-old (80+) will decrease considerably. Today, the total annual cost for the care of the elderly (health care and social services) in Sweden is about SEK 110 billion (about 6% of the GNP). The costs of health care are better correlated with the number of remaining years of life than with number of years from birth. The cost of health care during the last year in life is higher for the oldest-old than for the young-old. Informal care of demented persons is about 4-5 times more extensive than formal care. There is a strong correlation between GNP per citizen and resources spent on health care.
PubMed ID
11602962 View in PubMed
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The impact of policy changes on the health of recent immigrants and refugees in the inner city. A qualitative study of service providers' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190523
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):118-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leah S Steele
Louise Lemieux-Charles
Jocalyn P Clark
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Inner City Health Research Unit, Department of Family and Community Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. leah.steele@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):118-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - economics - trends
Delivery of Health Care - economics - trends
Emigration and Immigration
Health Policy - economics - trends
Health status
Hospitals, Public - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Prescription Fees - trends
Refugees
Urban Health Services - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Abstract
Dramatic changes to health and social policy have taken place in Ontario over the last five years with few attempts to measure their impact on health outcomes. This study explored service providers' opinions about the impact of four major policy changes on the health of recent immigrant and refugee communities in Toronto's inner city.
Semi-structured key informant interviews.
Reductions in funding for welfare, hospitals and community agencies were seen to have had major effects on the health of newcomers. Emergent themes included erosion of the social determinants of health, reduced access to health care, increased need for advocacy, deterioration in mental health, and an increase in wife abuse.
Several areas were identified where policy changes were perceived to have had a negative impact on the health of recent immigrants and refugees. This study provides insights for policy-makers, inner-city planners and researchers conducting population-based studies of immigrant health.
PubMed ID
11963515 View in PubMed
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