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Action research: a hospital responds to domestic violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182841
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(3):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Robin A Mason
Author Affiliation
Violence and Health Research Program, Centre for Research in Women's Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(3):18-22
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Domestic Violence
Female
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Planning Techniques
Women's health
Abstract
Using action-research methods and the principles of community development, a small working group initiated an organization-wide process to sensitize the Sunnybrook and Women's College hospital community to the relationship between violence and women's health. In this article, we explore the process by which the initiative was successfully introduced into the newly merged hospital. We describe critical factors for the initiative's success and offer some suggestions on how to maximize opportunities for organizational change.
PubMed ID
14618828 View in PubMed
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Adding up provincial expenditures on health care for Manitobans: a POPULIS project. Population Health Information System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201448
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M. Shanahan
C. Steinbach
C. Burchill
D. Friesen
C. Black
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW, Australia.
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Health Status Indicators
Home Care Services - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Infant
Information Systems - organization & administration
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - economics
Middle Aged
Mortality
Needs Assessment
Nursing Homes - economics
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Using the POPULIS framework, this project estimated health care expenditures across the entire population of Manitoba for inpatient and outpatient hospital utilization, physician visits, mental health inpatient, and nursing home utilization.
This estimated expenditure information was then used to compare per capita expenditures relative to premature mortality rates across the various areas of Manitoba.
Considerable variation in health care expenditures was found, with those areas having high premature mortality rates also having higher health care expenditures.
PubMed ID
10409018 View in PubMed
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Adolescent health: a rural community's approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174863
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2005 Apr-Jun;5(2):366
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jean N Groft
Brad Hagen
Nancy K Miller
Natalie Cooper
Sharon Brown
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. jngroft.gs@alumni.ucalgary.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2005 Apr-Jun;5(2):366
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Alberta
Body Image
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Exercise
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Questionnaires
Rural health services - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Smoking
Street Drugs
Students - psychology
Abstract
Significant health problems encountered in adulthood often have their roots in health behaviours initiated during adolescence. In order to reverse this trend, school and health personnel, as well as parents and other community members working with high school students, need to be aware of the health-related beliefs and choices that guide the behaviours of teenagers. Although a wide variety of research has been conducted on this topic among urban adolescents, less is known about the health beliefs and behaviors of adolescents residing in rural areas, particularly in Canada. In general, rural Canadians are less healthy than their urban counterparts. Building on the knowledge and understanding of their own community, key stakeholders were invited to engage in the design and implementation of a participatory action research project aimed at understanding and improving the health of rural adolescents.
A group of parents, teachers, students, school administrators and public health nurses engaged in a participatory action research project to better understand determinants of the health of rural adolescents at a high school in Western Canada. Group members developed and administered a health survey to 288 students from a small rural high school, in an effort to identify areas of concern and interest regarding health practices and beliefs of rural adolescents, and to take action on these identified concerns.
Results indicated some interesting but potentially worrying trends in this population. For example, while frequent involvement in a physical activity was noted by 75.9% of participants, close to half of the females (48%) described their body image as 'a little overweight' or 'definitely overweight', and approximately 25.8% of respondents noted that they skipped meals most of the time. Differences between the genders were apparent in several categories. For example, more girls smoked (16.2%) than boys (12.3%), and more males (55.0%) than females (41%) had tried illegal drugs. Participants indicated awareness of other health-compromising behaviours, including unsafe driving habits and high stress levels, and acknowledged several steps they wanted to take to improve their health, as well as the barriers to taking those steps. Students identified improved nutrition, stress reduction, and increased levels of physical activity as particular important health goals. Students also recommended ways in which information and support could be provided within the school environment to enable them to achieve their health-related goals. Several activities developed in collaboration with students have incorporated the recommendations, and have spawned other activities in response to the ongoing identification of new concerns.
The process of including the rural community in the identification of health assets and needs from the perspective of students -- as well as the planning and implementation of appropriate strategies to address those needs -- demonstrates the strengths inherent within a small rural population. Community members' awareness of the need to create a healthy environment for youth is reflected in their willingness to participate in activities leading to improved health. Greater awareness of the health needs of rural adolescents, and of the influence of gender in some aspects of health behaviors, will help researchers to explore ways in which the unique culture of rural communities can be harnessed to help shape health-focused interventions.
PubMed ID
15885025 View in PubMed
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Advancing HIV/AIDS prevention among American Indians through capacity building and the community readiness model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166148
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
Irene S Vernon
Barbara Plested
Author Affiliation
Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity, Colorado State University, Ft Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Financing, Government
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Planning Technical Assistance
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Social Marketing
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although HIV/AIDS prevention has presented challenges over the past 25 years, prevention does work! To be most effective, however, prevention must be specific to the culture and the nature of the community. Building the capacity of a community for prevention efforts is not an easy process. If capacity is to be sustained, it must be practical and utilize the resources that already exist in the community. Attitudes vary across communities; resources vary, political climates are constantly varied and changing. Communities are fluid-always changing, adapting, growing. They are "ready" for different things at different times. Readiness is a key issue! This article presents a model that has experienced a high level of success in building community capacity for effective prevention/intervention for HIV/AIDS and offers case studies for review. The Community Readiness Model provides both quantitative and qualitative information in a user-friendly structure that guides a community through the process of understanding the importance of the measure of readiness. The model identifies readiness- appropriate strategies, provides readiness scores for evaluation, and most important, involves community stakeholders in the process. The article will demonstrate the importance of developing strategies consistent with readiness levels for more cost-effective and successful prevention efforts.
PubMed ID
17159467 View in PubMed
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The Andrew Pattullo lecture. Healthy populations or healthy institutions: the dilemma of health care management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212676
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1995;13(3):453-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Applying TQM to community health improvement: nine works in progress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214945
Source
Qual Lett Healthc Lead. 1995 Jul-Aug;7(6):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Knapp
D. Hotopp
Author Affiliation
Institute for Healthcare Improvement, USA.
Source
Qual Lett Healthc Lead. 1995 Jul-Aug;7(6):23-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Canada
Community Health Planning - organization & administration - standards
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Mentors
Organizational Objectives
Pilot Projects
Total Quality Management - standards
United States
Urban health
Abstract
Traditionally, quality improvement principles have been used in business and healthcare settings. Nine North American cities, however, have demonstrated how these same QI principles can be applied to improving community health. Guided by a conceptual framework based on a three-question model and employing a Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle, the communities were able to develop interventions that are bringing about change in targeted populations, ranging from reducing the number of suspensions from school due to violence among youths to improving post-neonatal mortality rates.
Notes
Erratum In: Qual Lett Healthc Lead 1995 Sep;7(7):15
PubMed ID
10144756 View in PubMed
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Balancing empiricism and local cultural knowledge in the design of prevention research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174453
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii44-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Philip A Fisher
Thomas J Ball
Author Affiliation
Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene, OR 97401-2426, USA. philf@oslc.org
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii44-55
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - organization & administration
Alaska
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Empirical Research
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research - methods
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Inuits - ethnology
Models, organizational
Primary Prevention - methods - organization & administration
Research Design
Abstract
Prevention research aims to address health and social problems via systematic strategies for affecting and documenting change. To produce meaningful and lasting results at the level of the community, prevention research frequently requires investigators to reevaluate the boundaries that have traditionally separated them from the subjects of their investigations. New tools and techniques are required to facilitate collaboration between researchers and communities while maintaining scientific rigor. This article describes the tribal participatory research approach, which was developed to facilitate culturally centered prevention research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. This approach is discussed within the broader context of community-based participatory research, an increasingly prevalent paradigm in the prevention field. Strengths and limitations of the approach used in the study are presented.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15933330 View in PubMed
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Barriers to population-focused health promotion: the experience of public health nurses in the province of Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167054
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2006 Sep;38(3):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Benita Cohen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Helen Glass Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2006 Sep;38(3):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Health Policy
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Leadership
Manitoba
National health programs - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Public Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Environment
Abstract
There is growing evidence that population health is influenced by broad socio-environmental factors that require population-focused health promotion strategies. The author reports on a study of the perspectives of public health nurses (PHNs) on the nature of their health promotion practice in the Canadian province of Manitoba, highlighting their perceptions about barriers to population-focused health promotion. A descriptive, exploratory research design was used to conduct standardized open-ended interviews with 24 PHNs in 3 geographically and demographically diverse health authorities. There were remarkable similarities in PHNs' perceptions about their practice. Three categories of barrier to population-focused health promotion were identified: barriers at the level of individual PHNs; organizational barriers (culture, policies, processes); and extra-organizational barriers at the level of the community or province. The results point to a gap between the theory that population-focused health promotion is at the heart of PHN practice and the experience of PHNs at the 3 sites. A concerted effort to address the barriers is needed so that PHNs in Manitoba can play a leadership role in creating a health-care system that truly invests in population health.
PubMed ID
17037113 View in PubMed
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Can a health unit take action on the determinants of health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172344
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Sep-Oct;96(5):374-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Charles Gardner
Neil Arya
Mary L McAllister
Author Affiliation
Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit, Brockville, ON. charles.gardner@healthunit.org
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Sep-Oct;96(5):374-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Planning Organizations
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Health Administration
Socioeconomic Factors
Sociology, Medical
Abstract
There is growing interest in improving population health by multi-sectorial partnerships that address the determinants of health. The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit worked with some 80 other community agencies to form the Lanark, Leeds and Grenville Health Forum in the spring of 2000. The goals of this Health Forum were to evaluate the determinants of health of the population over a five-year period, identify activities within an overall Health Improvement Plan to address these determinants, pursue ongoing resources for interventions, assess their impact on health, and modify plans and activities accordingly. The Health Forum identified that their region had increased mortality rates from cardiovascular disease and cancers compared with the rest of Ontario. The local district health unit offered three possible determinants to explain this: socio-economic determinants (residents below provincial average for income and education), behavioural determinants (residents had higher rates of smoking, sedentary activity and high fat diets) and lack of access to health care. The Health Forum developed a Health Improvement Plan to work on each of these determinants. Throughout its lifetime, the Health Forum proved to be both active and productive, leading to many cooperative ventures. This paper provides a brief overview of the approach taken with its Health Improvement Plan, as well as the successes and limitations of this approach. The experience of the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark Health Forum offers a practical model for public health units to work with partner agencies to address the determinants of health, as well as some insights into the requirements to sustain such a model.
PubMed ID
16238158 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.