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108 records – page 1 of 11.

Advanced community nursing practice: Athabasca University meets the challenge of primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210439
Source
AARN News Lett. 1996 Dec;52(11):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
B A Getzlaf
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nursing and Health Studies, Athabasca University, Alberta.
Source
AARN News Lett. 1996 Dec;52(11):12
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community Health Nursing - education
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Humans
Nurse Practitioners - education
Primary Health Care
PubMed ID
9025340 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyzing the state of community health nursing: advancing from deficit to strengths-based practice using appreciative inquiry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159544
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Candace Lind
Dawn Smith
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4. cylind@ucalgary.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education - methods - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
School Health Services - organization & administration
Social Justice
Abstract
In this article we critically analyze the disconnect between much of the contemporary discourse and practice in Canadian community health nursing (CHN) that has contributed to the slow progress of strengths-based, health-promoting nursing practice. Appreciative inquiry philosophy and methods are introduced as a bridge to traverse this disciplinary gap. Two exemplars show how appreciative, strengths-based CHN research and action can move policies and programs toward more socially just practices congruent with CHN values. Exciting potential for nursing knowledge may arise from incorporating more strengths-based approaches into practice, education, policy, and research.
PubMed ID
20531267 View in PubMed
Less detail

An interdisciplinary rural health course: opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188132
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Frances E Racher
Author Affiliation
School of Health Studies, Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. racher@brandonu.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - education
Counseling - education
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Professional, Retraining - organization & administration
Humans
Manitoba
Needs Assessment
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Rural Health
Social Work - education
Abstract
What is the potential of courses designed for nursing students to meet the learning priorities of other disciplines? Who could benefit? Nursing students at Brandon University interested in the 'community as client' concept requested a course that focused on the health of rural residents and the communities in which they live. Questions about (1) measuring the health of rural populations; (2) comparing health status, health resources and health care utilization of rural and urban populations; and (3) determining the health of rural communities emerged. As a result the course, 'Health of Rural Populations and Communities', was created. The Director of the Rural Development Institute examined the syllabus for the new course and asked that Rural Development students be allowed to enroll. This paper focuses on the challenges and opportunities for nursing education to address learning needs of other disciplines by sharing health and nursing knowledge. In doing so the learning of nursing students is also advanced. The development and delivery of a rural health course is used as a case study to illustrate the potential of this approach for nursing and interdisciplinary education.
PubMed ID
12383738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Building community health nursing in the People's Republic of China: a partnership between schools of nursing in Ottawa, Canada, and Tianjin, China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202181
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
N. Edwards
H. Bunn
W C Mei
Z D Hui
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. nedwards@zeus.med.uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Apr;16(2):140-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
International Educational Exchange
Job Description
Ontario
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Urban health
Abstract
Community health nursing in China is an emerging specialty. A multi-component collaborative endeavor between the Schools of Nursing of Tianjin Medical University, China, and the University of Ottawa, Canada is described. This project, funded by the Canadian International Development Agency, commenced in 1989. It has laid the groundwork for an expanded role for community health nurses in Tianjin, a municipality of 11 million people located in Northeast China. The historical context for the evolution of community health nursing in China and the emergence of community health nursing as a priority area within the project are described. Major project activities are highlighted, illustrating several underlying principles for strengthening the educational preparation of baccalaureate nurses who can apply community health skills. These include creating a critical mass of faculty who can teach community health nursing, modelling classroom and clinical teaching of community health nursing, bridging the gap between nursing in the community and nursing, in the hospital, and developing a prototype for baccalaureate community health nursing experience. Lessons learned from this initiative are summarized.
PubMed ID
10319665 View in PubMed
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Capturing a vision for nursing: undergraduate nursing students in alternative clinical settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171927
Source
Nurse Educ. 2005 Nov-Dec;30(6):263-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheryl Reimer Kirkham
Catherine Hoe Harwood
Lynn Van Hofwegen
Author Affiliation
Nursing Department, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC. Sheryl.Kirkham@twu.ca
Source
Nurse Educ. 2005 Nov-Dec;30(6):263-70
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Health Nursing - education
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Humans
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
An urgent need to secure additional community health placements provided initial motivation to use alternate clinical settings. Subsequent student requests for placement in these settings, rather than the traditional community settings, drew attention to the sites' unique and far-reaching benefits. Presenting the findings of a qualitative study, the authors discuss the perspectives of students, instructors, and RNs regarding their experiences in these alternative clinical settings and provide recommendations for the use of alternative settings in nursing education.
PubMed ID
16292150 View in PubMed
Less detail

The challenge of providing student support at a distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217565
Source
Concern. 1994 Aug;23(4):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 May;34(3):346-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
B. Ellefsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing Science, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. bodil.ellefsen@sykepleievit.uio.no
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 May;34(3):346-55
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Job Description
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Organizational Innovation
Patient Participation
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Scotland
Workload
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation is to describe Scottish health visitors (HVs) experience of changes in their work and compare these with their Norwegian counterparts.
The renewed emphasis on community health care, health promotion and illness prevention is a strong reason to focus on health visiting work. Knowledge about changes in practice are of special interest for nursing science as such knowledge could contribute to the development and advancement of the health visiting service.
The study used a comparative descriptive design. The data are based upon in-depth interviews with nine HVs from Scotland and 12 HVs from Norway.
The results showed similarities as well as differences. HVs in Scotland and Norway experienced changes in work load with decreases in some areas and increases in others, changes in work practice, approaches and techniques with more emphasis on clients' empowerment, and also fewer management positions held by nurses. The differences mainly related to the ways that the health visiting service had specialized and expanded. The aim of Scottish health visiting from 'cradle to grave' service was not adopted by the Norwegian HVs to the same extent. Scottish HVs specialized individually in some areas and used each other's competence to a much greater degree than the Norwegian HVs.
It appeared that the Scottish HVs had found a path where health visiting work aimed at illness prevention and health promotion for everyone was on the way to becoming a comprehensive service and a stronger and more integrated part of the health visiting service. This is a pathway that Norwegian HVs still have to pursue. The qualitative approach and the slightly different samples limited the possibility for generalizations. Further research should address the question of changes and patterns in health visiting work, of how the development came about, and what are the bases for the differences in specialization and expansion of the service. Secondly it should be asked to what degree the development influences the quality of health visiting and consequences for clients, community and health visiting service.
PubMed ID
11328440 View in PubMed
Less detail

The changing environment of community health practice and education: perceptions of staff nurses, administrators, and educators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206053
Source
J Nurs Educ. 1998 Mar;37(3):109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
K I Chalmers
I J Bramadat
M A Andrusyszyn
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Educ. 1998 Mar;37(3):109-17
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education - trends
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - trends
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Nurse Administrators
Questionnaires
Abstract
Historically, baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada have prepared graduates to practice in the community. Two recent trends-the move to prepare all registered nurses in degree programs and the changing climate in which community nursing is practiced-made it timely to explore the educational preparation required for community health practice. This article reports on one part of the study, i.e., on findings that explicate the nature of community health nursing practice in a western Canadian province, as it has changed during the past decade, as it is currently practiced, and as it is expected to develop in the future. What, in other words, is the nature of the community practice for which nursing students should be prepared? An action research design guided the study. Participants were recruited from all major urban, rural, and northern settings in which baccalaureate nurses practice throughout the province. The perspective of relevant people was considered important, i.e., nurses practicing in the community, administrators, and educators of future community nurses. One hundred eighteen (118) participants were interviewed in 27 focus groups. Data were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for content. Among the themes identified were those that captured changes community health nurses experienced in their nursing practice. Nurses also described how they thought practice would evolve in the years to come. These themes are discussed within a primary health care framework in which nurses can be expected to play a more active role in shaping community health nursing practice.
PubMed ID
9535226 View in PubMed
Less detail

108 records – page 1 of 11.