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1023 records – page 1 of 103.

[2 health visitors' experience with pregnancy visits: pregnancy visits are a good start for cooperation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66135
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1977 Feb 9;77(6):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-1977
Author
J. Nielsen
H. Kohler
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1977 Feb 9;77(6):12-4
Date
Feb-9-1977
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Denmark
Female
Health education
Humans
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
PubMed ID
584538 View in PubMed
Less detail

[8 share the nurse administrator's job in Trelleborg. Interview by Kaj Nyman].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221866
Source
Vardfacket. 1993 Jan 14;17(1):14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-1993
Author
C. Persson
M. Wirne
Source
Vardfacket. 1993 Jan 14;17(1):14
Date
Jan-14-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Nurse Administrators
Sweden
PubMed ID
8122429 View in PubMed
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[12 years of cross-professional team work in childbirth in Herlev]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65229
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Jan 17;90(3):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-1990

[24-hour care--tempting with local wages].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219884
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 Nov 3;93(44):22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-1993
Author
A M Bohsen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 Nov 3;93(44):22
Date
Nov-3-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - economics - manpower
Denmark
Humans
Rural Population
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
PubMed ID
8042152 View in PubMed
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[A blow in the face. Interview by Mette Fjordbo.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73399
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 Jan 20;93(3):4-6, 23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993

[Accreditation visit. An enriching experience].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235217
Source
Nurs Que. 1987 May-Jun;7(3):59
Publication Type
Article

Accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of leg ulcers reduce prevalence, care time and costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81702
Source
J Wound Care. 2006 Jun;15(6):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Oien R F
Ragnarson Tennvall G.
Author Affiliation
Blekinge Wound Healing Centre, Lyckeby, Sweden. rut.oien@ltblekinge.se
Source
J Wound Care. 2006 Jun;15(6):259-62
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bandages
Community Health Nursing - economics - education
Cost Control
Cost of Illness
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Humans
Leg Ulcer - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - nursing
Male
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Staff - economics - education - psychology
Population Surveillance
Practice Guidelines
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Skin Care - economics - nursing
Sweden - epidemiology
Time and Motion Studies
Workload - economics
Wound Healing
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This long-term follow-up recorded the prevalence, aetiology and treatment of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers, and an estimated nurses' time spent providing care, for the years 1994-2005. METHOD: A questionnaire was sent to all district and community nurses in the county of Blekinge, Sweden, during one week in 1994, 1998, 2004 and 2005. Calculating the costs of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcer care was not a primary aim, but the reduction in prevalence and time spent on wound management suggested it was important to illustrate the economic consequences of these changes over time. RESULTS: Estimated prevalence of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers reduced from 0.22% in 1994 to 0.15% in 2005. Treatment time decreased from 1.7 hours per patient per week in 1994 to 1.3 hours in 2005. Annual costs of leg and foot ulcer care reduced by SEK 6.96 million in the study area from 1994 to 2005. CONCLUSION: Improved wound management was demonstrated; leg and foot ulcer prevalence and treatment time were reduced. The results could be attributed to an increased interest in leg and foot ulcer care among staff, which was maintained by repeated questionnaires, continuous education, establishment of a wound healing centre in primary care and wound management recommendations from a multidisciplinary group. The improved ulcer care reduced considerably the annual costs of wound management in the area.
PubMed ID
16802562 View in PubMed
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ACTION: application and extension of the GENESIS community analysis model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211809
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
C K Russell
D M Gregory
D. Wotton
E. Mordoch
M M Counts
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Tennessee, Memphis 38163, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing
Cultural Diversity
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Models, Nursing
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
United States
Urban health
Abstract
GENESIS (General Ethnographic and Nursing Evaluation Studies In the State) is a tested and proven community analysis strategy that integrates ethnographic and epidemiologic data to arrive at a comprehensive, holistic description of the health of a community and its residents. Communities analyzed in most project GENESIS studies have been rural or semirural. ACTION (Assessing Communities Together in the Identification Of Needs) is an extension of the GENESIS community analysis model that was developed to meet the unique needs of community-level research and analysis in an urban, multicultural setting. Significant differences in the context in which the ACTION projects took place necessitated extensions in specific components of the GENESIS model. Application of the GENESIS model by the ACTION team is described. Based on the experiences with ACTION, recommendations are offered for future urban, multicultural community analysis projects.
PubMed ID
8677234 View in PubMed
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1023 records – page 1 of 103.