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Access to and continuity of primary medical care of different providers as perceived by the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164689
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Pirjo Halonen
Arto Vehviläinen
Jorma Takala
Esko Kumpusalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Unit of Family Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pekka.mantyselka@uku.fi
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study people's views on the accessibility and continuity of primary medical care provided by different providers: a public primary healthcare centre (PPHC), occupational healthcare (OHC), and a private practice (PP).
A nationwide population-based questionnaire study.
Finland.
A total of 6437 (from a sample of 10,000) Finns aged 15-74 years.
Period of time (in days) to get an appointment with any physician was assessed via a single structured question. Accessibility and continuity were evaluated with a five-category Likert scale. Values 4-5 were regarded as good.
Altogether 72% had found that they could obtain an appointment with a physician within three days, while 6% had to wait more than two weeks. Older subjects and subjects with chronic diseases perceived waiting times as longer more often than younger subjects and those without chronic diseases. The proportion of subjects who perceived access to care to be good was 35% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 78% in a PP. The proportion of subjects who were able to get successive appointments with the same doctor was 45% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 81% in a PP. A personal doctor system was related to good continuity and access in a PPHC.
Access to and continuity of care in Finland are suboptimal for people suffering from chronic diseases. The core features of good primary healthcare are still not available within the medical care provided by public health centres.
Notes
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Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2002 Jun;52(479):459-6212051209
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2002 Oct;37(5):1403-1712479503
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):140-416923622
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Dec;10(4):290-41480869
Cites: J Fam Pract. 2004 Dec;53(12):974-8015581440
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jan 17;174(2):177-8316415462
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Mar;24(1):1-216464807
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;1(3):149-5515043376
PubMed ID
17354156 View in PubMed
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Access to colposcopy services for high-risk Canadian women: can we do better?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177878
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):346-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gina S Ogilvie
Elizabeth A Shaw
Sandra P Lusk
Joyce Zazulak
Janusz A Kaczorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. gina.ogilvie@bccdc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):346-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Colposcopy - utilization
Community health centers - standards
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite overall decreasing mortality from cervical cancer, selected groups of Canadian women continue to have suboptimal access to diagnostic and treatment interventions for cervical cancer. In this paper, we present an evaluation of a colposcopy program developed to improve attendance for colposcopy in a lower socio-economic and immigrant population.
All women attending the North Hamilton Community Health Centre (CHC) who required colposcopic assessment and were referred to a newly developed colposcopy program based at the CHC were evaluated. Attendance rates for consultation, follow up and treatment in women referred for colposcopy were compared retrospectively for the CHC-based colposcopy program and concurrently with the regional colposcopy clinic (RCC).
Women referred to the CHC colposcopy program had a significant reduction in their no-show rate after the introduction of the locally based colposcopy program (17.2% vs. 1.3%, p
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):325-815490919
PubMed ID
15490923 View in PubMed
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Access to primary health care for immigrants: results of a patient survey conducted in 137 primary care practices in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117685
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:128
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Elizabeth Muggah
Simone Dahrouge
William Hogg
Author Affiliation
CT Lamont Primary Health Care Research Centre, Élisabeth Bruyère Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada. emuggah@bruyere.org
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:128
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Capitation Fee - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Community Health Centers - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Fee-for-Service Plans - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Primary Health Care - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Questionnaires
Self Report
Abstract
Immigrants make up one fifth of the Canadian population and this number continues to grow. Adequate access to primary health care is important for this population but it is not clear if this is being achieved. This study explored patient reported access to primary health care of a population of immigrants in Ontario, Canada who were users of the primary care system and compared this with Canadian-born individuals; and by model of primary care practice.
This study uses data from the Comparison of Models of Primary Care Study (COMP-PC), a mixed-methods, practice-based, cross-sectional study that collected information from patients and providers in 137 primary care practices across Ontario, Canada in 2005-2006. The practices were randomly sampled to ensure an equal number of practices in each of the four dominant primary care models at that time: Fee-For-Service, Community Health Centres, and the two main capitation models (Health Service Organization and Family Health Networks). Adult patients of participating practices were identified when they presented for an appointment and completed a survey in the waiting room. Three measures of access were used, all derived from the patient survey: First Contact Access, First Contact Utilization (both based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool) and number of self-reported visits to the practice in the past year.
Of the 5,269 patients who reported country of birth 1,099 (20.8%) were born outside of Canada. In adjusted analysis, recent immigrants (arrival in Canada within the past five years) and immigrants in Canada for more than 20 years were less likely to report good health compared to Canadian-born (Odds ratio 0.58, 95% CI 0.36,0.92 and 0.81, 95% CI 0.67,0.99). Overall, immigrants reported equal access to primary care services compared with Canadian-born. Within immigrant groups recently arrived immigrants had similar access scores to Canadian-born but reported 5.3 more primary care visits after adjusting for health status. Looking across models, recent immigrants in Fee-For-Service practices reported poorer access and fewer primary care visits compared to Canadian-born.
Overall, immigrants who were users of the primary care system reported a similar level of access as Canadian-born individuals. While recent immigrants are in poorer health compared with Canadian-born they report adequate access to primary care. The differences in access for recently arrived immigrants, across primary care models suggests that organizational features of primary care may lead to inequity in access.
Notes
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2002 Jun;37(3):529-5012132594
Cites: J Immigr Health. 2004 Jan;6(1):15-2714762321
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95(3):I9-1315191126
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95(3):I30-415191130
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Oct;59(8):1613-2715279920
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Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2005 Apr;10(2):77-8315831190
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2005 Aug;40(4):1234-4616033502
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:15617147819
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:4117349059
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2007;8:6418047642
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Mar;54(3):335-6, 338-918337519
Cites: Ethn Health. 2008 Apr;13(2):129-4718425711
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Nov-Dec;99(6):505-1019149396
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2009 Apr;21(2):103-1119286829
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 May 26;180(11):E72-8119468106
Cites: Ethn Health. 2009 Jun;14(3):315-3619263262
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 2009;39(3):545-6519771955
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2010 Dec;45(6 Pt 1):1693-71920819107
Cites: Health Soc Care Community. 2011 Jan;19(1):70-921054621
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Sep 6;183(12):E952-820584934
PubMed ID
23272805 View in PubMed
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[Activities of a consultation and diagnostic polyclinic for AIDS and AIDS-related infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103740
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1990;(6):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A G Rakhmanova
V K Prigozhina
A Iu Kolmakov
Iu K Chernyshev
S A Gordeev
V A Smirnov
G A Makarenko
V D Chuprina
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1990;(6):45-9
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Complex - diagnosis
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis
Community Health Centers - organization & administration
Humans
Referral and Consultation
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
The analysis of curative and diagnostic work of AIDS counselling and diagnostic units (CDU) showed that during a year and a half 15,000 people had been screened, 27 of these were identified as persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 4 persons identified at other places, were registered for followup. It was found that 51.3 percent of people were screened anonymously, reason for screening being epidemiological indications--history of blood transfusions, homosexual contacts, irregular sexual intercourse. The rest did not observe anonymity, 10.7 percent of these persons were screened by clinical indications. The in-depth clinical screening of patients who sought care in CDU, patients infected with HIV and persons who had contacts with them, required the consultative services of different specialists--dermatovenerologists, gynaecologists, sexologists, stomatologists and some others. It determined the necessity of establishing an outpatient department of "AIDS and AIDS-indicatory infections" which represented a new organizational form of AIDS service.
PubMed ID
2145635 View in PubMed
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[Activities of an antituberculosis dispensary and medical sanitary unit with regard to the detection of patients with chronic nonspecific lung diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239651
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1985;(1):17-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985

[Activities of a public health physician of the sanitary epidemiological station at the present-day stage].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226464
Source
Gig Sanit. 1991 May;(5):72-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991

[Acute otitis media is not treated according to recommendations. Survey of treatment patterns in emergency centers and community health centers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30054
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 7;101(41):3142-3, 3146
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-7-2004
Author
Anna Lundborg Ander
Robert Eggertsen
Author Affiliation
Lindome vårdcentral.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 7;101(41):3142-3, 3146
Date
Oct-7-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Community Health Centers
Comparative Study
Emergency medical services
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Penicillin V - administration & dosage
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines
Prescriptions, Drug
Sweden
Abstract
Usual recommended treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) is antibiotics or expectancy. Different parts of Europe have varying therapy with Holland as an example of more restrictive use of antibiotics. The purpose with this study was to see differences in treatment length, choice of antibiotics, and differences in handling on daytime and emergency hours. 432 case records of children, aged up to ten years were retrospectively investigated. The result shows that antibiotics were prescribed to all except five patients. First choice of antibiotic (70 per cent) was penicillin V that also was more used at emergency hours than daytime at the health centre. Treatment time varied from five to ten days in contrast to national recommendations of five-day therapy. Registrars preferred five-day therapy and specialists seven days. We conclude that penicillin V is first choice of treatment in AOM, that treatment time varies from five to ten days without any underlying reasons and that expectancy was used only in very few cases.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Nov 18;101(47):3824, 382715609540
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 28;101(44):3461; author reply 346115560664
PubMed ID
15517708 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy of health care services for young immigrant families].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212002
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 May-Jun;87(3):152-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Gravel
G. Legault
Author Affiliation
Direction de la Santé Publique, Régie régionale Montréal-Centre, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 May-Jun;87(3):152-7
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Community Health Centers
Emigration and Immigration
Family - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
This article relates the results of descriptive exploratory research conducted through interviews with 297 young immigrant families and 40 health and social workers on the primary health problems encountered by the families and on how they resolved these problems. Families and workers rank problems in different orders of priority. While families give priority to the health problems of their children, workers give priority to the problems encountered by the mothers, and in particular, mental health problems. Families and workers alike express a desire for help from the health and social service system for these problems. For families, this help would come from family doctors and nurses. These health providers are subsequently consulted; when they are not, language is determined to be the main obstacle to accessibility. Difficulties related to cultural compatibility of services are seen as more numerous by workers than by families.
PubMed ID
8771914 View in PubMed
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[Admission of alcoholics to a medical center]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74467
Source
Lakartidningen. 1979 Nov 7;76(45):4000-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-1979

Adoption of the chronic care model to improve HIV care: in a marginalized, largely aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113082
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jun;59(6):650-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
David Tu
Patricia Belda
Doreen Littlejohn
Jeanette Somlak Pedersen
Juan Valle-Rivera
Mark Tyndall
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Native Health Society, 449 Hastings St E, Vancouver, BC V6A 1P5, Canada. davidtu9@gmail.com
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jun;59(6):650-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers
Female
HIV Seropositivity - ethnology - therapy
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medication Adherence - ethnology
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - prevention & control
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Marginalization
Syphilis - diagnosis
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis
Urban Health Services
Viral Load
Abstract
To measure the effectiveness of implementing the chronic care model (CCM) in improving HIV clinical outcomes.
Multisite, prospective, interventional cohort study.
Two urban community health centres in Vancouver and Prince George, BC.
Two hundred sixty-nine HIV-positive patients (18 years of age or older) who received primary care at either of the study sites.
Systematic implementation of the CCM during an 18-month period.
Documented pneumococcal vaccination, documented syphilis screening, documented tuberculosis screening, antiretroviral treatment (ART) status, ART status with undetectable viral load, CD4 cell count of less than 200 cells/mL, and CD4 cell count of less than 200 cells/mL while not taking ART compared during a 36-month period.
Overall, 35% of participants were women and 59% were aboriginal persons. The mean age was 45 years and most participants had a history of injection drug use that was the presumed route of HIV transmission. During the study follow-up period, 39 people died, and 11 transferred to alternate care providers. Compared with their baseline clinical status, study participants showed statistically significant (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23766052 View in PubMed
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435 records – page 1 of 44.