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[Access of French-speaking elderly to nursing homes among minorities, a linguistic challenge for health and greater welfare].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129806
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Eric Forgues
Michel Doucet
Josée Guignard Noël
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. eric.forgues@umoncton.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Date
Dec-2011
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication Barriers
Health Services Accessibility
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Language
Minority Groups
New Brunswick
Nursing Homes
Abstract
Access to long-term nursing homes by French-speaking seniors in minority situations is a very real problem. However, few studies have been conducted on this subject. We wanted to better understand this issue in New Brunswick while taking into account the language aspect. In this article, we will present the problem based on different issues encountered by Francophones in minority situations and by giving an overview of the studies conducted on French-speaking seniors in minority situations. We will then address the issue related to the rights of French-speaking senior to receive services in French in nursing homes by analyzing briefly the province's legal requirements. Furthermore, we will present the regulatory framework of nursing homes in New Brunswick. Finally, we will provide a geographic analysis of existing New Brunswick nursing homes while taking into account the language aspect, the levels of service and the distribution of French-speaking seniors within the territory.
PubMed ID
22067633 View in PubMed
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[Access to health care: perceptions of patients with multiple chronic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167791
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Martin Fortin
Danielle Maltais
Catherine Hudon
Lise Lapointe
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine de Famille, l'Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Date
Nov-2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Chronic Disease
Communication Barriers
Female
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Quebec
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access.
Qualitative study with focus groups.
Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que.
Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions.
For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held.
The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access.
Systematic callbacks, family physicians' personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16926944 View in PubMed
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Access to primary health care among homeless adults in Toronto, Canada: results from the Street Health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131318
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Erika Khandor
Kate Mason
Catharine Chambers
Kate Rossiter
Laura Cowan
Stephen W Hwang
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Communication Barriers
Cost of Illness
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Homeless Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite experiencing a disproportionate burden of acute and chronic health issues, many homeless people face barriers to primary health care. Most studies on health care access among homeless populations have been conducted in the United States, and relatively few are available from countries such as Canada that have a system of universal health insurance. We investigated access to primary health care among a representative sample of homeless adults in Toronto, Canada.
Homeless adults were recruited from shelter and meal programs in downtown Toronto between November 2006 and February 2007. Cross-sectional data were collected on demographic characteristics, health status, health determinants and access to health care. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between having a family doctor as the usual source of health care (an indicator of access to primary care) and health status, proof of health insurance, and substance use after adjustment for demographic characteristics.
Of the 366 participants included in our study, 156 (43%) reported having a family doctor. After adjustment for potential confounders and covariates, we found that the odds of having a family doctor significantly decreased with every additional year spent homeless in the participant's lifetime (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.86-0.97). Having a family doctor was significantly associated with being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered (adjusted OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.04-7.00), having a health card (proof of health insurance coverage in the province of Ontario) (adjusted OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.61-4.89) and having a chronic medical condition (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.03-3.53).
Less than half of the homeless people in Toronto who participated in our study reported having a family doctor. Not having a family doctor was associated with key indicators of health care access and health status, including increasing duration of homelessness, lack of proof of health insurance coverage and having a chronic medical condition. Increased efforts are needed to address the barriers to appropriate health care and good health that persist in this population despite the provision of health insurance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21915240 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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Achieving high acceptability of HIV testing in a population-based survey among immigrants in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265149
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Paula J Tiittala
Pia S Kivelä
Matti A Ristola
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Päivikki M S Koponen
Mulki Mölsä
Jukka Ollgren
Kirsi Liitsola
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):393-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
HIV Infections - diagnosis
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing among migrants in Finland and the factors contributing to non-acceptance.
The Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study 'Maamu' was the first national population-based Health Interview and Examination Survey (HIS/HES) among migrants in Finland. A total of 386 Kurdish, Russian and Somali immigrants in Helsinki participated in the study.
Despite the participants' different sociodemographic backgrounds, a high rate of test acceptability (92%, 95% CI 90-95) was achieved. HIV test acceptance was associated with pretest counselling, ability to understand spoken Finnish or Swedish and employment status. No participants tested positive for HIV.
The results imply that a universal HIV testing strategy is well accepted in a low-HIV prevalence immigrant population and can be included in a general health examination in immigrant population-based surveys.
PubMed ID
25788469 View in PubMed
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[A comment concerning the proposal for a competence-center for better hearing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189527
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 May 30;99(22):2556-7; author reply 2557
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-2002

323 records – page 1 of 33.