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The 15-Minute Family Interview as a learning strategy for senior undergraduate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117158
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lorraine Holtslander
Jessica Solar
Nicole R Smith
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. lorraine.holtslander@usask.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Family Nursing - education - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Nursing
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Nursing care of families continues to be a challenge within complex and demanding health-care systems. Educational strategies to bridge the theory-practice gap, connecting classroom learning with clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing education, enable students to develop the skills required to form meaningful partnerships with families. This article describes how undergraduate nursing students complete a 15-Minute Family Interview in a clinical practice setting, and document the interview process in a reflective major paper. Students integrate research and theory and identify ways to improve the care of families in the clinical setting while building communication skills and confidence in interacting with families in everyday practice. The implementation of the assignment and the evaluation of the process, including quotes from 10 student papers and 2 clinical faculty members, are discussed. Implications for education and ongoing research are offered.
PubMed ID
23329627 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of an emotional and behavioural screening tool for children in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in urban NSW.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140192
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Anna Williamson
Sally Redman
Mark Dadds
John Daniels
Catherine D'Este
Beverley Raphael
Sandra Eades
Tracey Skinner
Author Affiliation
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. anna.williamson@saxinstitute.org.au
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child Welfare
Community Health Services
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental health
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and face validity of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHOs) located in the greater Sydney region.
A qualitative study was conducted in three ACCHOs located within the greater Sydney region in 2008-2009. A semi-structured approach was used in focus groups and small group interviews (n = 47) to elicit participants' views on the appropriateness of the SDQ and any additional issues of importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health.
The SDQ was found to cover many important aspects of Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health, however, the wording of some questions was considered ambiguous and some critical issues are not explored. The peer relationships subscale did not appear to fit well with Aboriginal concepts of the relative importance of different interpersonal relationships.
Overall the SDQ was acceptable in ACCHOs in Sydney; however, changes to the wording of some questions and the response scale may be indicated to improve cultural appropriateness and clarity. A further set of issues which are not covered by any commonly used screening tools but are of critical importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health should also be considered by clinicians.
PubMed ID
20932203 View in PubMed
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Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257231
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Townsend
Susan M Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada. atownsen@exchange.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Biomedical research
British Columbia
Communication
Comprehension
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Therapeutic Misconception
Abstract
Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies.
This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7.
A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment.
Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or treatment. Those with low health status may be more vulnerable to potential coercion, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach to obtaining consent. Our findings also indicate the need for boundary work in order to better differentiate treatment and research. It is important however to acknowledge a categorical ambiguity; it is not always the case that people are misinformed about the possible benefits of research procedures (i.e., therapeutic misconception); our participants were aware that the primary purpose of research is to gain new knowledge yet they also identified a range of actual health benefits arising from their participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24119203 View in PubMed
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Active sick leave for patients with back pain: all the players onside, but still no action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191123
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Mar 15;27(6):654-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2002
Author
Inger B Scheel
Kåre Birger Hagen
Andrew D Oxman
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. inger.scheel@folkehelsa.no
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Mar 15;27(6):654-9
Date
Mar-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - rehabilitation
National Health Programs - utilization
Norway - epidemiology
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
Semistructured interviews, group discussions, and a mailed survey.
To identify barriers to the use of active sick leave (ASL) and to design an intervention to improve the use of ASL by patients with low back pain.
ASL was introduced in Norway in 1993 to encourage people on sick leave to return to modified work. With ASL the National Insurance Administration (NIA) pays 100% of wages, thereby allowing the employer to engage a substitute worker at no extra cost, in addition to the worker on ASL. Arranging ASL requires cooperation between the general practitioner (GP), employer, local NIA staff, and the patient, which may explain why ASL was used in less than 1% of the eligible sick leave cases in 1995, despite strong support from all players.
The authors conducted five in-depth interviews at a workplace where ASL was successfully implemented. Questionnaires were sent to 89 GPs, 102 workplace representatives, and 22 local NIA officers in three counties. Five patients with back pain who had used ASL were interviewed in a focus group, and 10 patients with back pain who had not used ASL were interviewed using a structured guide. Five workplaces participated in a dialogue conference. Data collection and analysis were iterative, and new data were constantly compared with the previously analyzed materials.
About 80% of the GPs, employers, and NIA officers believed ASL is effective in reducing long-term sick leave. Among the barriers identified were lack of information, lack of time, and work flow barriers such as poor communication and coordination of activities between the players required to carry out ASL. Two strategies were designed to improve the workflow between them. A passive implementation strategy was designed to require a minimum amount of economic and administrative support. It included targeted information, clinical guidelines for low back pain, a reminder to GPs in the sick leave form, and a standardized agreement. A proactive strategy included the same four elements plus a kick-off continuing education seminar for GPs and a trained resource person to facilitate the use of ASL.
Having all the players onside may be essential, but it is not sufficient to bring about action in workplace strategies for patients with low back pain. If early return to modified work is effective, implementing it may require interventions targeted at identified barriers.
PubMed ID
11884914 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of a two-year oral health intervention programme in two Swedish secondary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113112
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
E. Hedman
P. Gabre
D. Birkhed
M. Lepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentisty, Public Dental Health, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Communication
Dental Hygienists
Dental Prophylaxis
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Focus Groups
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oral Health
Patient Participation
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Professional-Patient Relations
School Dentistry
Self Concept
Sweden
Time Factors
Trust
Abstract
To describe adolescents' experiences of participating in a school-based oral health intervention programme for 2 years containing education about oral health and fluoride varnish treatment at the school clinic.
Sixteen adolescents aged 13-16 were interviewed in three focus group sessions. A phenomenographic approach was used for analysis.
The results are presented as three themes and seven descriptive categories. The three themes were 'Seeing the dental hygienist', 'Treatments at the dental hygiene clinic' and 'Education about oral health in class'. The results demonstrate satisfaction with the intervention, such as accessibility, time gain and expanding knowledge. On the other hand, feelings of vulnerability in the treatment sessions were expressed. The fluoride varnish treatment was given both positive and negative reviews. The contact between the participants and the dental hygienist was important, and the opportunity to ask questions about oral health issues was emphasized.
Both positive and negative experiences of the programme were found. Adolescence is a transitional period of life, and for this reason, it is important to create a good working alliance between students and the dental hygienist in future school-based oral health interventions.
PubMed ID
23763634 View in PubMed
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Advance directives: the views of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221256
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Apr 15;148(8):1331-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1993
Author
M. Kelner
I L Bourgeault
P C Hébert
E V Dunn
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Science, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Apr 15;148(8):1331-8
Date
Apr-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advance Directives - statistics & numerical data
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Medicine
Family Practice
Female
Geriatrics
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Intensive Care
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medical Oncology
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined the views and experiences of 20 physicians and 20 nurses at a major Canadian teaching hospital regarding the use of advance directives in clinical care.
The participants were purposively drawn from four clinical specialties: family and community medicine, oncology, intensive care and geriatrics. Detailed interviews were conducted in person. Content analysis was used to code the data, which were further analysed with both quantitative and qualitative techniques.
Thirty-nine of the 40 participants favoured the use of advance directives in clinical care; physicians had somewhat less positive attitudes than nurses toward such directives. Advance directives were thought by participants to be helpful in resolving disagreements between patients and their families about treatment options; in making patients more comfortable, both physically and psychologically, during the process of dying; and in opening up communication and trust among patients, their families and health care professionals. Concerns about the use of advance directives focused on the lack of clarity in some patients' instructions, the absence of legal status for directives, the possible interference with a practitioner's clinical judgement, the adequacy and appropriateness of patients' information about their circumstances, and the type of intervention (passive or active) requested by patients.
New regulations and legislation are making the use of advance directives more widespread. Health care professionals should participate in the development and implementation of these directives. Continuing professional education is essential in this regard.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8462055 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the network form of organization of traumatic brain injury service delivery systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131085
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(12):1188-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marie-Eve Lamontagne
Bonnie R Swaine
André Lavoie
Emmanuelle Careau
Author Affiliation
École de réadaptation, Université de Montréal, Canada.
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(12):1188-97
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
Abstract
Networks are an increasingly popular way to deal with the lack of integration of traumatic brain injury (TBI) care. Knowledge of the stakes of the network form of organization is critical in deciding whether or not to implement a TBI network to improve the continuity of TBI care.
To report the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of a TBI network and to consider these elements in a discussion about whether networks are a suitable solution to fragmented TBI care.
In-depth interviews with 12 representatives of network organization members. Interviews were qualitatively analyzed using the EGIPSS model of performance.
The majority of elements reported were related to the network's adaptation to its environment and more precisely to its capacity to acquire resources. The issue of value maintenance also received considerable attention from participants.
The network form of organization seems particularly sensitive to environmental issues, such as resource acquisition and legitimacy. The authors suggest that the network form of organization is a suitable way to increase the continuity of TBI care if the following criteria are met: (1) expectations toward network effectiveness to increase continuity of care are moderate and realistic; (2) sufficient resources are devoted to the design, implementation, and maintenance of the network; (3) a network's existence and actions are deemed legitimate by community and organization member partners; and (4) there is a good collaborative climate between the organizations.
PubMed ID
21939374 View in PubMed
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An intercultural nursing perspective on autonomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181656
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2004 Jan;11(1):28-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Ingrid Hanssen
Author Affiliation
Lovisenberg Deaconal University College, Lovisenberggt. 15 B, 0456 Oslo, Norway. Ingrid.Hanssen@ldh.no
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2004 Jan;11(1):28-41
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Disclosure - ethics
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Care - ethics - organization & administration
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
This article is based on an empirical study regarding ethical challenges in intercultural nursing. The focus is on autonomy and disclosure. Autonomy is a human capacity that has become an important ethical principle in nursing. Although the relationship between autonomy and patients' possibly harmful choices is discussed, the focus is on 'forced' autonomy. Nurses seem to equate respect with autonomy; it seems to be hard to cope with the fact that there are patients who voluntarily undergo treatment but who actively participate neither in the treatment offered nor in making choices regarding that treatment. Nurses' demand for patients to be autonomous may in some cases jeopardize the respect, integrity and human worth that the ethical principle of autonomy is meant to ensure. Even though respect for a person's autonomy is also respect for the person, one's respect for the person in question should not depend on his or her capacity or aptitude to act autonomously. Is autonomy necessarily a universal ethical principle? This article negates this question and, through the issues of culture, individualism versus collectivism, first- and second-order autonomy, communication and the use of family interpreters, and respect, an attempt is made to explain why.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Ethics. 2004 Sep;11(5):515-615362360
PubMed ID
14763648 View in PubMed
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An intersectoral network for chronic disease prevention: the case of the Alberta healthy living network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148163
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2009;29(4):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
R. Geneau
B. Legowski
S. Stachenko
Author Affiliation
World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Chronic Non-Communicable Disease Policy, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. robert_geneau@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2009;29(4):153-61
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Health Priorities
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interinstitutional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Organizational Case Studies
Preventive Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Chronic Diseases (CDs) are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. CD experts have long promoted the use of integrated and intersectoral approaches to strengthen CD prevention efforts. This qualitative case study examined the perceived benefits and challenges associated with implementing an intersectoral network dedicated to CD prevention. Through interviewing key members of the Alberta Healthy Living Network (AHLN, or the Network), two overarching themes emerged from the data. The first relates to contrasting views on the role of the AHLN in relation to its actions and outcomes, especially concerning policy advocacy. The second focuses on the benefits and contributions of the AHLN and the challenge of demonstrating non-quantifiable outcomes. While the respondents agreed that the AHLN has contributed to intersectoral work in CD prevention in Alberta and to collaboration among Network members, several did not view this achievement as an end in itself and appealed to the Network to engage more in change-oriented activities. Managing contrasting expectations has had a significant impact on the functioning of the Network.
PubMed ID
19804679 View in PubMed
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Anishinabe youth perceptions about community health: toward environmental repossession.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263059
Source
Health Place. 2014 Mar;26:127-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Katie Big-Canoe
Chantelle A M Richmond
Source
Health Place. 2014 Mar;26:127-35
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Networks
Environmental health
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
This community-based research applied environmental dispossession as a theoretical framework for understanding Anishinabe youth perceptions about health, social relationships and contemporary Anishinabe way of life in Northern Ontario, Canada. Qualitative interviews with 19 youth reveal considerable worry about their community's health. Youth perceive changes in the Anishinabe way of life, including decreased access to their traditional lands, to be central to poor health at the community level. Youth emphasized the importance of social relationships for fostering healthy behaviours and developing community wide initiatives that will provide opportunities for reconnecting to land, and for learning and practicing Indigenous Knowledge. This study builds on the growing body of decolonizing research with Indigenous communities, and it concludes by offering the concept of environmental repossession as a way forward for studies on the Indigenous environment-health interface.
PubMed ID
24440804 View in PubMed
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356 records – page 1 of 36.