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424 records – page 1 of 43.

[2d Report from Sandnes: psychiatric home nursing a gain for primary health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246570
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Dec 5;66(19):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-1979
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Dec 5;66(19):12-5
Date
Dec-5-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services
Home Care Services
Humans
Norway
Primary Health Care
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
260372 View in PubMed
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[25th anniversary of the RSMH (National Association for Social and Mental Health): campaign organization has been growing in the living rooms].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223085
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Sep 15;16(15):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1992
Author
C. Roxström
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Sep 15;16(15):12
Date
Sep-15-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Sweden
PubMed ID
1299097 View in PubMed
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[Activities as a psychiatric district nurse: findings support belief in the value of psychiatric district nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247588
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Jan 10;79(2):4-7, 23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1979
Author
B. Jensen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Jan 10;79(2):4-7, 23
Date
Jan-10-1979
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Community Mental Health Services
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Humans
Patient care team
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
253473 View in PubMed
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[Activities of the municipal and county psychiatric wards. A statistical survey]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74832
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1967 Oct 26;129(43):1437-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-1967

The addition of social support to a community-based large-group behavioral smoking cessation intervention: improved cessation rates and gender differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188900
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Jul-Aug;27(4):547-59
Publication Type
Article
Author
Linda E Carlson
Eileen Goodey
Marlene Hahn Bennett
Paul Taenzer
Jan Koopmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. lindacar@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Jul-Aug;27(4):547-59
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior Therapy
Canada
Community Mental Health Services
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine the effects on cessation rates of adding a partner support group component to a large-group community-based behavioral smoking cessation program.
During the past eight smoking cessation programs at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, separate support group sessions were offered for support persons of prospective quitters. Six hundred smokers brought 156 support people with them to the groups. Cessation rates were calculated at 3, 6, and 12 months postquit.
Those smokers who had support people attending at least one of the support group sessions had higher cessation rates at 3, 6, and 12 months (56%, 46%, and 43%) compared to those without a support person in attendance (36%, 35%, 32%). This effect was especially strong for men, with 3-, 6-, and 12-month cessation rates for those with support of 58%, 54%, and 56%, compared to 52%, 41%, and 36% in the women with support. For men without a support person, the rates were 34%, 35%, and 33%, compared to 38%, 35%, and 31% in women without support. This indicates that although support was initially effective for women, it had no effect on sustained abstinence.
The addition of a support person group to a large-group behavioral smoking cessation program was effective in improving 3-month cessation rates in both men and women, but over 1-year of follow-up support was only associated with greater sustained abstinence in men.
PubMed ID
12188591 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with anorexia nervosa: multiple perspectives of discharge readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173064
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri L Turrell
Ron Davis
Heather Graham
Iris Weiss
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sturrell@nygh.on.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Aftercare
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
Little is known about the conditions that must be in place to help adolescent patients and their families gain the confidence needed to continue recovery at home, following the adolescents' hospitalization for anorexia nervosa.
Beliefs about discharge readiness were obtained through an open-ended questionnaire following the patients' first weekend pass home from an in-patient unit. The perceptions of patients, parents, and registered nurses were obtained using parallel versions of a questionnaire.
An examination of the responses revealed four themes; medical stability, education, psychological changes, and community resource planning, that were common to all respondents, as well as themes specific to adolescents and to nurses.
The findings suggest that each group of respondents has unique discharge readiness needs and that registered nurses have an important role to play in helping patients and families make the transition home as successful as possible. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.
PubMed ID
16137269 View in PubMed
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[A halfway house: its structure, function and results obtained in the course of the last two years].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111482
Source
Laval Med. 1967 Jan;38(1):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1967
Author
L. Crégheur
P E Phoenix
Source
Laval Med. 1967 Jan;38(1):63-6
Date
Jan-1967
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Mental Health Services
Halfway Houses
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
5628187 View in PubMed
Less detail

424 records – page 1 of 43.