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The effect of training in communication skills on medical doctors' and nurses' self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78567
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Jun;66(3):270-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Ammentorp Jette
Sabroe Svend
Kofoed Poul-Erik
Mainz Jan
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. ammentorp@tdcadsl.dk
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Jun;66(3):270-7
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Communication
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Pediatric Nursing - education
Pediatrics - education
Professional-Patient Relations
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of communication skills training on doctors' and nurses' self-efficacy, to explore how training courses influence the initial experience of self-efficacy and to identify determinants of health professionals' self-efficacy. METHODS: The study was conducted as a randomized trial. Clinicians in the intervention group received a 5 day communication course and the control group received no intervention. The impact of the intervention was evaluated by means of questionnaires measuring the effect of communication courses on changes in doctors' and nurses' self-efficacy. RESULTS: Clinicians who participated in the communication course improved their self-efficacy for specific communication tasks with up to 37%. The improvements remained constant for the following 6 months. The training course did not influence the initial experience of self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: Communication skills training can improve clinicians' evaluation of his or her ability to perform a specific communication task - measured as self-efficacy. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Communication courses can be used to improve doctors' and nurses' ability to perform some of the essential communicative demands they are facing in daily praxis.
PubMed ID
17337337 View in PubMed
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Natural history and etiology of liver disease in patients with previous community-acquired acute non-A, non-B hepatitis. A follow-up study of 178 Danish patients consecutively enrolled in The Copenhagen Hepatitis Acuta Programme in the period 1969-1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10563
Source
J Hepatol. 1999 Nov;31(5):800-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
K. Grønbaek
H B Krarup
H. Møller
K. Krogsgaard
M. Franzmann
J. Sonne
H. Ring-Larsen
O. Dietrichson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark. karin.gr@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Hepatol. 1999 Nov;31(5):800-7
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Cause of Death
Community-Acquired Infections - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepacivirus - isolation & purification
Hepatitis C - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
RNA, Viral - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Consecutive patients originally diagnosed with acute non-A, non-B hepatitis were followed up to assess the long-term morbidity and mortality and to re-evaluate the etiology in surviving patients. METHODS: Follow-up was performed in 178 patients with acute non-A, non-B hepatitis enrolled in the Copenhagen Hepatitis Acuta Programme in the period 1969-1987. Mortality and morbidity were assessed using: i) death certificates and ii) diagnoses at discharge following all somatic admissions. All patients who were alive were offered a re-examination encompassing clinical, biochemical and virological evaluation. RESULTS: After a median of 23 years, 71 (40%) had died and seven (4%) were untraceable. Overall mortality and mortality due to cirrhosis and accidents, mainly intoxication with drugs, were significantly higher compared to those of an age- and sex-matched Danish population. Chronic hepatitis had been diagnosed in 19 (11%) and cirrhosis in 16 (9%). Of 100 patients who were alive, 57 accepted a re-examination. Anti-HCV was detected in 24 (42%) and 19 (33%) were HCV-RNA positive. Of the viremic patients, 11 (58%) had elevated P-ALT, but only three (16%) had already been diagnosed with HCV infection. A history of intravenous drug use was tantamount to anti-HCV positivity. CONCLUSIONS: Danish patients with community-acquired acute non-A, non-B hepatitis had an increased mortality due to liver cirrhosis during the first years after the acute infection. Alcohol was the etiological agent in several cases, but HCV infection may also have been present. However, the long-term HCV-related morbidity and mortality were low.
PubMed ID
10580576 View in PubMed
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