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Being useful: achieving indigenous youth involvement in a community-based participatory research project in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124411
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tara Ford
Stacy Rasmus
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Center for Alaska Native Health Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. tjford@alaska.edu
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Community-Based Participatory Research - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Abstract
To report on a participatory research process in southwest Alaska focusing on youth involvement as a means to facilitate health promotion. We propose youth-guided community-based participatory research (CBPR) as way to involve young people in health promotion and prevention strategizing as part of translational science practice at the community-level.
We utilized a CBPR approach that allowed youth to contribute at all stages.
Implementation of the CBPR approach involved the advancement of three key strategies including: (a) the local steering committee made up of youth, tribal leaders, and elders, (b) youth-researcher partnerships, and (c) youth action-groups to translate findings.
The addition of a local youth-action and translation group to the CBPR process in the southwest Alaska site represents an innovative strategy for disseminating findings to youth from a research project that focuses on youth resilience and wellbeing. This strategy drew from two community-based action activities: (a) being useful by helping elders and (b) being proud of our village.
In our study, youth informed the research process at every stage, but most significantly youth guided the translation and application of the research findings at the community level. Findings from the research project were translated by youth into serviceable action in the community where they live. The research created an experience for youth to spend time engaged in activities that, from their perspectives, are important and contribute to their wellbeing and healthy living. Youth-guided CBPR meant involving youth in the process of not only understanding the research process but living through it as well.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22584510 View in PubMed
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The Circles of Care evaluation: doing participatory evaluation with American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178726
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):139-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
James Allen
Pamela B Deters
Author Affiliation
Tri Ethnic Center for Prevention Research, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):139-54
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Community Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Cultural Characteristics
Delivery of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Health Planning Support
Health Services Research - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, South American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Terminology as Topic
United States
Abstract
Little information exists regarding mental health and special needs related to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI-AN) families. In this paper we emphasize the use of oral tradition during the Circles of Care initiative, which was essential in understanding cultural history and historical trauma of AI-ANs while giving a greater understanding of an AI-AN-based definition of severe emotional disturbance (SED). The success of these methods serves as a template for improving systems of care and may be useful in evaluation among a wide range of ethnic communities.
PubMed ID
15322981 View in PubMed
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Disseminating research in rural Yup'ik communities: challenges and ethical considerations in moving from discovery to intervention development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107727
Source
Pages 409-416 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):409-416
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Disseminating research in rural Yup'ik communities: challenges and ethical considerations in moving from discovery to intervention development Inna Rivkin1*, Joseph Trimble2 , Ellen D.S. Lopez1, Samuel Johnson3 , Eliza Orr4 and James Allen4 ยท5 1 Department of
  1 document  
Author
Inna Rivkin
Joseph Trimble
Ellen D S Lopez
Samuel Johnson
Eliza Orr
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Center for Alaska Native Health Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. idrivkin@alaska.edu
Source
Pages 409-416 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):409-416
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alaska
Community-Based Participatory Research - ethics
Culture
Ethics, Research
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Information Dissemination - ethics - methods
Rural Population
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - therapy
Translating
Abstract
The native people of Alaska have experienced historical trauma and rapid changes in culture and lifestyle patterns. As a consequence, these populations shoulder a disproportionately high burden of psychological stress. The Yup'ik Experiences of Stress and Coping project originated from rural Yup'ik communities' concerns about stress and its effects on health. It aimed to understand the stressful experiences that affect Yup'ik communities, to identify coping strategies used to deal with these stressors and to inform culturally responsive interventions.
Here, we examine the process of moving from research (gaining understanding) to disseminating project findings to translation into intervention priorities. We highlight the importance of community participation and discuss challenges encountered, strategies to address these challenges and ethical considerations for responsible intervention research with indigenous communities that reflect their unique historical and current socio-cultural realities.
Community-wide presentations and discussions of research findings on stress and coping were followed by smaller Community Planning Group meetings. During these meetings, community members contextualized project findings and discussed implications for interventions. This process placed priority on community expertise in interpreting findings and translating results and community priorities into grant applications focused on intervention development and evaluation.
Challenges included translation between English and Yup'ik, funding limitations and uncertainties, and the long timelines involved in moving from formative research to intervention in the face of urgent and evolving community needs. The lack of congruence between institutional and community worldviews in the intervention research enterprise highlights the need for "principled cultural sensitivity".
Cultural sensitivity requires sharing results that have practical value, communicating openly, planning for sustainability and incorporating indigenous knowledge and expertise through a community-guided process. Our research findings will inform continued work within our partnership as we co-develop culturally based strategies for multilevel community interventions to address stress.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984272 View in PubMed
Documents
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Feasibility of a community intervention for the prevention of suicide and alcohol abuse with Yup'ik Alaska Native youth: the Elluam Tungiinun and Yupiucimta Asvairtuumallerkaa studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266095
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):153-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Gerald V Mohatt
Carlotta Ching Ting Fok
David Henry
James Allen
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):153-69
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Community-Based Participatory Research
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Inuits - ethnology
Male
Rural Population
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The Elluam Tungiinun and Yupiucimta Asvairtuumallerkaa studies evaluated the feasibility of a community intervention to prevent suicide and alcohol abuse among rural Yup'ik Alaska Native youth in two remote communities. The intervention originated in an Indigenous model of protection, and its development used a community based participatory research process. Feasibility assessment aimed to assess the extent to which (1) the intervention could be implemented in rural Alaska Native communities, and (2) the intervention was capable of producing measurable effects. Scales maximally sensitive to change were derived from earlier measurement work, and the study contrasted implementation process and outcomes across the two communities. In one community, medium dose response effects (d = .30-.50), with dose defined as number of intervention activities attended, were observed in the growth of intermediate protective factors and ultimate variables. In the other community, medium dose effects were observed for one intermediate protective factor variable, and small dose effects were observed in ultimate variables. Differences across communities in resources supporting intervention explain these contrasting outcomes. Results suggest implementation in these rural Alaska settings is feasible when sufficient resources are available to sustain high levels of local commitment. In such cases, measureable effects are sufficient to warrant a prevention trial.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24952248 View in PubMed
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Introduction to ecological description of a community intervention: building prevention through collaborative field based research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266101
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
James Allen
Gerald V Mohatt
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):83-90
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Child
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Humans
Inuits
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Suicide - prevention & control
Abstract
This special issue of the American Journal of Community Psychology is the result of a 18-year partnership with Alaska Native communities using collaborative field based research methods. Its goal is to provide a case study fulfilling the spirit of ecological inquiry, offering a detailed and nuanced description of a community intervention. The articles describe the nature of our work, including some of our successes, as well as challenges, dilemmas, and even disappointments we experienced along the way. Our primary aim was to develop and assess the feasibility of a complex, multi-level intervention to increase protective factors hypothesized to reduce suicide and alcohol abuse among rural Yup'ik Alaska Native youth ages 12-18. The articles that follow include descriptions of the cultural context, relevant literature and project history, our methods of community engagement in measurement development strategies, an empirical test of the prevention model that guided the intervention, the development and implementation of the intervention, a feasibility and impact assessment, and an evaluation of community engagement. A final article summarizes what is generalizable from the work in field based intervention research with rural and culturally distinct populations, and future prospects for decolonizing community intervention research methods. These papers raise important issues, including (1) need for deep, contextual ecological descriptions, (2) reconceptualization of time in the research relationship, (3) distinctions between populations and communities, and (4) the conflict between values of communities and intervention science.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24912872 View in PubMed
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Mapping pathways to services: description of local service systems for American Indian and Alaska Native children by Circles of Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6009
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):65-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
James Allen
Pamela L LeMaster
Pamela B Deters
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Ak 99775-6480, USA. Jim.Allen@uaf.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2004;11(2):65-87
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - ethnology - therapy
Child
Community Health Planning - methods - organization & administration
Community Mental Health Services - methods - organization & administration - standards
Comparative Study
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Health Planning Support
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Needs Assessment
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation - methods
Records - statistics & numerical data
United States - ethnology
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
The process of describing existing services for American Indian and Alaska Native children with serious emotional disturbance by the Circles of Care strategic planning initiative is overviewed. We explain why service system description is important and how it helped define the role of evaluation within the initiative. Primary goals and methodologies of the service system description are described. Key findings, challenges and opportunities presented by the findings, and impact on the planning process are described.
PubMed ID
15322976 View in PubMed
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Multi-Level Cultural Intervention for the Prevention of Suicide and Alcohol Use Risk with Alaska Native Youth: a Nonrandomized Comparison of Treatment Intensity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299951
Source
Prev Sci. 2018 02; 19(2):174-185
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
02-2018
Author
James Allen
Stacy M Rasmus
Carlotta Ching Ting Fok
Billy Charles
David Henry
Author Affiliation
Department of Biobehavioral Health and Population Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus, Duluth, MN, 55812-3301, USA. jallen@umn.edu.
Source
Prev Sci. 2018 02; 19(2):174-185
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alaska Natives - psychology
Child
Community Networks
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Suicide - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Underage Drinking - prevention & control
Abstract
Suicide and alcohol use disorders are primary determinants of health disparity among Alaska Native people in contrast to the US general population. Qungasvik, a Yup'ik word for toolbox, is a strengths-based, multi-level, community/cultural intervention for rural Yup'ik youth ages 12-18. The intervention uses "culture as intervention" to promote reasons for life and sobriety in young people using local expertise, high levels of community direction, and community based staff. The intervention is grounded in local practices and adaptive to local cultural differences distinctive to rural Yup'ik communities. The current study compares the effectiveness of high-intensity intervention in one community (treatment), operationalized as a high number of intervention activities, or modules, implemented and attended by youth, contrasted to a lower intensity intervention in a second community (comparison) that implemented fewer modules. A Yup'ik Indigenous theory of change developed through previous qualitative and quantitative work guides intervention. In the model, direct intervention effects on proximal or intermediate variables constituting protective factors at the individual, family, community, and peer influences levels lead to later change on the ultimate prevention outcome variables of Reasons for Life protective from suicide risk and Reflective Processes about alcohol use consequences protective from alcohol risk. Mixed effects regression models contrasted treatment and comparison arms, and identified significant intervention effects on Reasons for Life (d = 0.27, p 
PubMed ID
28786044 View in PubMed
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Patterns of protective factors in an intervention for the prevention of suicide and alcohol abuse with Yup'ik Alaska Native youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121179
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
David Henry
James Allen
Carlotta Ching Ting Fok
Stacy Rasmus
Bill Charles
Author Affiliation
Institute for Health Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60608, USA. dhenry@uic.edu
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):476-82
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Child
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) with American Indian and Alaska Native communities creates distinct interventions, complicating cross-setting comparisons.
The objective of this study is to develop a method for quantifying intervention exposure in CBPR interventions that differ in their forms across communities, permitting multi-site evaluation.
Attendance data from 195 youth from three Yup'ik communities were coded for the specific protective factor exposure of each youth, based on information from the intervention manual. The coded attendance data were then submitted to latent class analysis to obtain participation patterns.
Five patterns of exposure to protective factors were obtained: Internal, External, Limits, Community/family, and Low Protection. Patterns differed significantly by community and youth age.
Standardizing interventions by the functions an intervention serves (protective factors promoted) instead of their forms or components (specific activities) can assist in refining CBPR interventions and evaluating effects in culturally distinct settings.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22931082 View in PubMed
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People awakening: collaborative research to develop cultural strategies for prevention in community intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266102
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):100-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
James Allen
Gerald V Mohatt
Sarah Beehler
Hillary L Rowe
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):100-11
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research
Culture
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Inuits - ethnology
Protective factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
The consequences of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and suicide create immense health disparities among Alaska Native people. The People Awakening project is a long-term collaboration between Alaska Native (AN) communities and university researchers seeking to foster health equity through development of positive solutions to these disparities. These efforts initiated a research relationship that identified individual, family, and community protective factors from AUD and suicide. AN co-researchers next expressed interest in translating these findings into intervention. This led to development of a strengths-based community intervention that is the focus of the special issue. The intervention builds these protective factors to prevent AUD and suicide risk within AN youth, and their families and communities. This review provides a critical examination of existing literature and a brief history of work leading to the intervention research. These work efforts portray a shared commitment of university researchers and community members to function as co-researchers, and to conduct research in accord with local Yup'ik cultural values. This imperative allowed the team to navigate several tensions we locate in a convergence of historical and contemporary ecological contextual factors inherent in AN tribal communities with countervailing constraints imposed by Western science.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24903819 View in PubMed
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The qasgiq model as an indigenous intervention: Using the cultural logic of contexts to build protective factors for Alaska Native suicide and alcohol misuse prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299090
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Edison Trickett
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Adolescent Development
Alaska Natives - psychology
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Humans
Protective factors
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control
Translating
Abstract
The foundational role culture and Indigenous knowledge (IK) occupy within community intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities is explored. To do this, we define community or complex interventions, then critically examine ways culture is translated into health interventions addressing AIAN disparities in existing programs and research initiatives. We then describe an Indigenous intervention based in the cultural logic of its contexts, as developed by Alaska Native communities. Yup'ik coauthors and knowledge keepers provided their critical and theoretical perspectives and understandings to the overall narrative, constructing from their IK system an argument that culture is prevention.
The intervention, the Qungasvik (phonetic: koo ngaz vik; "tools for life") intervention, is organized and delivered through a Yup'ik Alaska Native process the communities term qasgiq (phonetic: kuz gik; "communal house"). We describe a theory of change framework built around the qasgiq model and explore ways this Indigenous intervention mobilizes aspects of traditional Yup'ik cultural logic to deliver strengths-based interventions for Yup'ik youth. This framework encompasses both an IK theory-driven intervention implementation schema and an IK approach to knowledge production. This intervention and its framework provide a set of recommendations to guide researchers and Indigenous communities who seek to create Indigenously informed and locally sustainable strategies for the promotion of health and well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30714766 View in PubMed
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