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Outpatient thyroid surgery in a Toronto community hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126144
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Dec;40(6):458-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Michael Sklar
Mohamed J Ali
Philip Solomon
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Saskatoon, SK.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Dec;40(6):458-61
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Forecasting
Hospitals, Community - trends
Humans
Ontario
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Thyroid Diseases - surgery
Thyroidectomy - trends
Abstract
Thyroid surgery has been traditionally viewed as a procedure necessitating hospitalization of patients. There is a small but growing body of literature demonstrating the safety and efficacy of outpatient thyroid surgery.
Based on a review of the literature and a description of the protocol used to identify patients who are candidates for outpatient procedures, complications associated with the management of these patients are discussed.
Teritary referral otolaryngology practice within a community hospital.
The study period included 247 thyroid surgeries, of which 94 were completed on an outpatient basis. No complications were identified in the outpatient group.
Outpatient subtotal thyroidectomy is safe and effective. It has not been shown to increase postoperative complication rates. The practice of outpatient thyroid surgery can be of financial benefit to the Canadian health care system.
PubMed ID
22420432 View in PubMed
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The effects of a regional telepathology project: a study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126150
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Marie-Claude Trudel
Guy Paré
Bernard Têtu
Claude Sicotte
Author Affiliation
HEC Montréal, 3000, Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montréal, Canada, H3T 2A7. marie-claude.trudel@hec.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration - trends
Frozen Sections
Hospital Shared Services - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Medically underserved area
Organizational Case Studies
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Telepathology - organization & administration - trends
Abstract
Telepathology, which is an emerging form of telemedicine in Canada, is defined as the electronic transmission of pathological images, usually derived from microscopes, from one location to another. There are various applications of telepathology, including case referral for an expert opinion, provision of an emergency service in the absence of a resident pathologist, and education. Until now, there has been relatively little use of telepathology for core diagnostic services in the absence of a local pathologist, but this practice is likely to increase in the future. The Laval University Integrated Health Network is in the process of deploying a telepathology system, primarily to provide an intraoperative frozen section service to small hospitals in sparsely populated areas which are experiencing a severe shortage of on-site pathologists. The telepathology project involves 17 hospitals located in five regions of eastern Quebec, Canada. This paper describes the study protocol that will be used to evaluate the benefits associated with the project.
A panel of experts was first assembled by Canada Health Infoway to agree on a set of benefits indicators that could be applied to all telepathology projects across Canada. Using the set of indicators as an input, we have developed a three-step study protocol. First, a survey questionnaire will be distributed to appraise the way pathologists, pathology technologists and surgeons perceive the telepathology system and its impacts. Second, a series of semi-structured interviews will be conducted with project leaders and telepathology users at sites that are representative of all the hospitals in the Laval University Integrated Health Network. The overall aim is to better understand the expected and unexpected effects of telepathology on health care professionals and patients as well as on the regional organization and delivery of care services. Finally, a pre-post design using secondary data is proposed to evaluate a wide array of tangible benefits to the patients, the health care providers, the hospitals, and the region as a whole.
The Laval University Integrated Health Network's telepathology project is expected to yield positive and significant results that are relevant internationally. Our findings will provide valuable information on the nature and extent of benefits associated with telepathology systems intended to provide an intraoperative frozen section service to remote hospitals experiencing a shortage of specialists.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22420301 View in PubMed
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Population-based laboratory assessment of the burden of community-onset bloodstream infection in Victoria, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126171
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2013 Jan;141(1):174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
K B Laupland
P C Kibsey
D B Gregson
J C Galbraith
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2013 Jan;141(1):174-80
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sepsis - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Although community-onset bloodstream infection (BSI) is recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, its epidemiology has not been well defined in non-selected populations. We conducted population-based laboratory surveillance in the Victoria area, Canada during 1998-2005 in order to determine the burden associated with community-onset BSI. A total of 2785 episodes were identified for an overall annual incidence of 101·2/100,000. Males and the very young and the elderly were at highest risk. Overall 1980 (71%) episodes resulted in hospital admission for a median length of stay of 8 days; the total days of acute hospitalization associated with community-onset BSI was 28 442 days or 1034 days/100,000 population per year. The in-hospital case-fatality rate was 13%. Community-onset BSI is associated with a major burden of illness. These data support ongoing and future preventative and research efforts aimed at reducing the major impact of these infections.
PubMed ID
22417845 View in PubMed
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ERCP procedures in a Finnish community hospital: a retrospective analysis of 1207 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126196
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(1):45-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
A. Siiki
A. Tamminen
T. Tomminen
P. Kuusanmäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Kanta-Häme Central Hospital, Hämeenlinna, Finland. antti.siiki@uta.fi
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(1):45-50
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde - adverse effects - mortality - standards
Cholangitis - epidemiology
Cholestasis - therapy
Finland
Gallstones - therapy
Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Sphincterotomy, Endoscopic
Abstract
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a procedure with a risk of serious and life-threatening complications. The most common complications are pancreatitis, haemorrhage, perforation and cholangitis. The aim of this study was to determine indications, success rates and complications in a low-volume ERCP unit in Kanta-Häme Central Hospital (KHCH).
Data on 1207 consecutive ERCPs performed in KHCH between 2002 and 2009 was collected retrospectively from patient histories. Complications were classified according to need for intervention and length of hospitalisation.
Cannulation of the desired duct was successful in 89.2% of 825 ERCPs with no earlier sphincterotomy. Complete stone removal was achieved in 91.3% of procedures. Standard biliary sphincterotomy was performed in 73.8% and precut sphincterotomy in 12.0 % of cases. Cholangitis developed in 2.1%, bleeding in 1.9%, pancreatitis in 1.9%, perforation in 1.0% and cardio-pulmonary or miscellaneous complications in 4.2% of cases. The majority of complications could be managed conservatively. In procedures with no earlier sphincterotomy ERCP-related 30-day mortality was 0.2% (n=2) and overall 30-day mortality was 3.3% (n=27).
ERCP indications and success rates, as well as morbidity and mortality were comparable to those re-ported earlier. Although the success rate of cannulation and thereby ERCP procedures seem to be somewhat lower than in tertiary referral centres, ERCP procedures can be safely performed in a low-volume ERCP unit by concentrating procedures on a few experienced endoscopists. The success rates may be further improved with the latest cannulation techniques, used selectively in the last years of the study period.
PubMed ID
22414468 View in PubMed
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Weight management experiences of overweight and obese Canadian adults: findings from a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126204
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Mar;32(2):63-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
S F Kirk
R. Tytus
R T Tsuyuki
A M Sharma
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Sara.Kirk@dal.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Mar;32(2):63-9
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Communication
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - therapy
Overweight - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Self Report
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
We know little about how the 2006 Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management and prevention of obesity relate to Canadians' weight management experiences or whether these experiences reflect the recommendations in the Guidelines.
We used data from a general population omnibus survey to understand these two issues, particularly in relation to chronic disease. The survey included 23 questions related to weight management practices as well as those related to demographic characteristics.
Of 2004 respondents, 33% were classified as overweight and 20% as obese. In the 12 months before the survey, 48% of overweight and obese respondents reported asking their physician about weight loss, while 30% reported that their physician advised them to lose weight without them specifically asking. With regard to the recommendations within the Guidelines, 14% of overweight and 18% of obese respondents reported having their waist circumference measured, 82% of overweight and 87% of obese respondents reported having their blood pressure measured, and 36% of overweight and 50% of obese respondents reported having a test for diabetes.
These findings have implications for chronic disease identification and management.
PubMed ID
22414302 View in PubMed
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The Boost study: design of a school- and community-based randomised trial to promote fruit and vegetable consumption among teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126212
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:191
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Rikke Krølner
Thea Suldrup Jørgensen
Anne Kristine Aarestrup
Anne Hjøllund Christiansen
Anne Maj Christensen
Pernille Due
Author Affiliation
Centre for Intervention Research in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, University of Southern Denmark, National Institute of Public Health, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K, Denmark. rkr@niph.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:191
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Community Networks
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Denmark
Food Habits
Fruit - supply & distribution
Health promotion
Humans
Schools
Vegetables - supply & distribution
Abstract
The aim of the Boost study was to produce a persistent increase in fruit and vegetable consumption among 13-year-olds. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a school-and community-based, multi-component intervention guided by theory, evidence, and best practice.
We used the Intervention Mapping protocol to guide the development of the intervention. Programme activities combined environmental and educational strategies and focused on increasing access to fruit and vegetables in three settings: School: Daily provision of free fruit and vegetables; a pleasant eating environment; classroom curricular activities; individually computer tailored messages; one-day-workshop for teachers. Families: school meeting; guided child-parent activities; newsletters. Local community: guided visits in grocery stores and local area as part of classroom curriculum; information sheets to sports-and youth clubs.The Boost study employed a cluster-randomised controlled study design and applied simple two-stage cluster sampling: A random sample of 10 municipalities followed by a random sample of 4 schools within each municipality (N = 40 schools). Schools were randomised into a total of 20 intervention-and 20 control schools. We included all year 7 pupils except those from school classes with special needs. Timeline: Baseline survey: August 2010. Delivery of intervention: September 2010-May 2011. First follow-up survey: May/June 2011. Second follow-up survey: May/June 2012.
Daily mean intake of fruit and vegetables and habitual fruit and vegetable intake measured by validated 24-hour recall-and food frequency questionnaires.
determinants of fruit and vegetable intake, positive side-effects and unintended adverse effects. Implementation was monitored by thorough process evaluation.
The baseline data file included 2,156 adolescents (95%). There was baseline equivalence between intervention-and control groups for sociodemographics, primary outcomes, and availability at home, school and sports-and youth clubs. Significantly larger proportions of pupils in the control group had parents born in Denmark. The study will provide insights into effective strategies to increase fruit and vegetable intake among teenagers. The study will gain knowledge on implementation processes, intervention effects in population subgroups with low intake, and opportunities for including local communities in interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413782 View in PubMed
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Building capacity for interprofessional practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126270
Source
Clin Teach. 2012 Apr;9(2):94-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Christie Newton
Victoria Wood
Louise Nasmith
Author Affiliation
College of Health Disciplines, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Clin Teach. 2012 Apr;9(2):94-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Capacity Building - methods
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Education
Focus Groups
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Evidence indicates that professional development focused on collaborative practice can improve the quality of care and patient outcomes in specific populations. However, current educational knowledge does not include how to teach professionals to provide interprofessional collaborative care.
This paper discusses the design, implementation and evaluation of the Interprofessional Collaborative Learning Series (IP-CLS), which provides clinicians with interprofessional professional development that promotes interprofessional competencies, allowing them to incorporate elements of interprofessional collaboration into practice, and creates leaders for interprofessional collaborative practice. The IP-CLS was piloted at a regional health centre in Ontario. Participants completed an online retrospective before and after self-assessment to determine the extent to which the IP-CLS contributed to changes in participants' behaviours related to interprofessional collaboration. A focus group further explored the extent to which the IP-CLS fostered change.
Online survey results and an analysis of focus group transcripts reveal the strengths of the IP-CLS and the elements that could be improved upon. Findings indicate that the IP-CLS has the potential to build capacity for interprofessional collaboration.
The findings indicate that the IP-CLS has the potential to build capacity for interprofessional collaborative practice, and to help participants incorporate elements of interprofessional collaboration into practice.
PubMed ID
22405362 View in PubMed
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The cost of integrating a physical activity counselor in the primary health care team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126290
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2012 Mar-Apr;25(2):250-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
William E Hogg
Xue Zhao
Douglas Angus
Michelle Fortier
Jianwei Zhong
Tracey O'Sullivan
Ronald J Sigal
Chris Blanchard
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Uiversity of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. whogg@uottawa.ca
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2012 Mar-Apr;25(2):250-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Costs and Cost Analysis
Counseling - economics
Female
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Patient Care Team - economics
Primary Health Care - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
This article assesses direct costs of integrating a physical activity counselor (PAC) into primary health care teams to improve physical activity levels of inactive patients.
A monthly cost analysis was conducted using data from 120 inactive patients, aged 18 to 69 years, who were recruited from a community-based family medicine practice. Relevant cost items for the intensive counseling group included (1) office expenses; (2) equipment purchases; (3) operating costs; (4) costs of training the PAC; and (5) labor costs. Physical and human capital were amortized over a 5-year horizon at a discount rate of 5%.
Integrating a PAC into the primary health care team incurred an estimated one-time cost of CA$91.43 per participant per month. Results were very sensitive to the number of patients counseled.
The costs associated with the intervention are lower than many other intervention studies attempting to improve population physical activity levels. Demonstrating this competitive cost base should encourage additional research to assess the effectiveness of integrating a PAC into primary health care teams to promote active living among patients who do not meet recommended physical activity levels.
PubMed ID
22403209 View in PubMed
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Difficulties encountered in collaborative care: logistics trumps desire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126291
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2012 Mar-Apr;25(2):168-76
Publication Type
Article
Author
Frances Legault
Jennie Humbert
Stephanie Amos
William Hogg
Natalie Ward
Simone Dahrouge
Laura Ziebell
Author Affiliation
Ontario Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner Program, University of Ottawa, Ottawa ON, Canada. flegault@uottawa.ca
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2012 Mar-Apr;25(2):168-76
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease - therapy
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse practitioners
Ontario
Organization and Administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists
Physician's Role
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This study examines the development of collaborative relationships between family physicians (FPs) and Anticipatory And Preventative Team Care (APTCare) team members providing care to medically complex patients who have been identified as at-risk for negative health outcomes.
We undertook a qualitative study of a primary health care intervention in a family practice. Interviews were held with FPs and ATPCare intervention nurse practitioners (NPs) and pharmacists. Focus groups were conducted and a survey was administered to participating FPs, NPs, and pharmacists. NPs and pharmacists maintained a log recording their tasks and moments of collaboration.
Scheduling demands rendered face-to-face collaboration difficult, leaving the team to rely on technological tools to keep in touch. Limited space meant the APTCare team had to work out of a downstairs office, limiting informal interactions with the practitioners on the main level.
We demonstrate that the difficulties inherent in collaborative care are independent of the patient population being cared for. Regardless of the patient population and sector of health care, developing collaborative relationships and learning to work collaboratively is difficult and takes time. What many of these teams need is ongoing support and education about how to make these collaborative care practices work.
PubMed ID
22403197 View in PubMed
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Personalized medicine: challenge and promise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126293
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S12-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Judith Salmon Kaur
Daniel G Petereit
Author Affiliation
Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Kaur.judith@mayo.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S12-7
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Individualized Medicine - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The new health care buzz words include "personalized or individualized medicine." Populations such as American Indians and Alaska Natives potentially have much to gain from this new science to overcome the known health disparities in these populations. This will require participation and acceptance of diverse populations. This article reviews the promise and challenges of individualizing cancer care using principles of community-based participatory research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22403001 View in PubMed
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10340 records – page 1 of 1034.